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Shomeya: A cheat sheet for hook_entity_api()

Posted on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 by drupalroot

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The worst time to read software documentation is when you're trying to fix something that is broken and you have no idea why. I'd say it's like shopping when you're hungry, but it's actually the opposite. When stuff breaks for no apparent reason and you're on edge it's easy to notice every little issue with the docs, and you instantly form a very strong opinion on documentation.

The good news is that as a Drupal developer, you have tons of awesome documentation just a click away on api.drupal.org or drupal.org/documentation/develop and contributed module documentation is better than ever. Even though almost everything you could ever want to know about Drupal internals is available on api.drupal.org (even the source code!) sometimes you need to combine that with contributed docs, or dig in a little deeper.

Form API #states

Posted on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 by drupalroot

Drupal's Form API helps developers build complex, extendable user input forms with minimal code. One of its most powerful features, though, isn't very well known: the #states system. Form API #states allow us to create form elements that change state (show, hide, enable, disable, etc.) depending on certain conditions—for example, disabling one field based on the contents of another. For most common Form UI tasks, the #states system eliminates the need to write custom JavaScript. It eliminates inconsistencies by translating simple form element properties into standardized JavaScript code.

Lullabot: Form API #states

Posted on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 by drupalroot

Drupal's Form API helps developers build complex, extendable user input forms with minimal code. One of its most powerful features, though, isn't very well known: the #states system. Form API #states allow us to create form elements that change state (show, hide, enable, disable, etc.) depending on certain conditions—for example, disabling one field based on the contents of another. For most common Form UI tasks, the #states system eliminates the need to write custom JavaScript. It eliminates inconsistencies by translating simple form element properties into standardized JavaScript code.

Drupal Watchdog: Make Mine a Modal

Posted on Thursday, March 26th, 2015 by drupalroot
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Image Dialogs and Modals are an important UX pattern and can be used effectively both to provide information and to handle user interaction.

A key use for Dialogs and Modals in Drupal is to present a new user interaction without losing the original context. For example, when editing Views settings the modal allows the user to be presented with a new interface without navigating away from their original location.

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