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UNI Calendar of Events

College of Humanities, Arts, and Sciences

Earth and Environmental Sciences Seminar

"How the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Went from Being a Tidal Wave to a Tsunami: Implications for Science Literacy" by Scott Clark, geology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Clark will discuss how preliminary reports of the 2004 tsunami referred to it as a tidal wave, but within four days, 80% of news reports used the word "tsunami." Since that time, more than 97% of news stories have avoided the term "tidal wave" when describing subsequent events. Clark will explore the reasons that led the media to move away from the use of the term tidal wave and will comment on the potential implications of these findings for communication efforts on other earth science topics such as climate change.

Screening of 'The Good Lie'

"The Good Lie" (2014) tells the story of four of the 20,000 “Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan” who walked thousands of miles to find refuge from the Second Sudanese Civil War and who eventually resettled in the United Staes.

This film screening has been organized by UNI RISE (Refugee Support and Empowerment) and the UNI Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education. The event is free and open to the public.

"Dr. Seuss Wants You" and "Facing Prejudice"

The seventh annual collaboration begtween the UNI Center for Holocaust and Genocide Educaiton and the Grout Museum District is bringing two exhibits to the Grout Museum of History and Science. "Dr. Seuss Wants You," highlighting the political cartoons of Dr. Seuss that warned Americans of the growing threat of Nazi Germany, and "Facing Prejudice," which encourages viewers to examine, in a constructive, non-threatening way, the complexities of prejudice and stereotypes that reside in all of us.

Joseph Scapellato fiction reading

Joseph Scapellato will give a public reading from his book of short stories "Big Lonesome." Reinventing a great American tradition through an absurdist, discerning eye, Scapellato uses these stories to conjure worlds, themes and characters who are at once unquestionably familiar and undeniably strange. "Big Lonesome" navigates through the American West—from the Old West to the modern-day West to the Midwest, from cowboys to mythical creatures to everything in between—exploring place, myth, masculinity and what it means to be whole or to be broken.

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