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Monday, April 20, 2015 - 11:00 am to 12:00 pm

The geography department and Arctic lab will host a group of scientists from two leading research institutions in Siberia (Russia): the Sochava Institute of Geography and Baikal Institute of Nature Manegement. The presenters (Istomina, Batotsyrenov and Kuklina) will discuss their research in the areas of watershed management, environmental protection and sustainable tourism development initiatives in the Lake Baikal basin. Lake Baikal is the world's deepest lake and is the largest (by volume) freshwater lake in the world, containing roughly 20% of the world's unfrozen surface fresh water. 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

The Reaching for Higher Ground Film & Discussion Series explores topics related to the 2014-15 RHG theme Media and Social Media: A Networked Society. 

This evening Panopticon: The Documentary about your Privacy will be screened and serve as the basis for personal reflection and dialogue: “As technology advances our privacy is disappearing. This documentary, Panopticon, explores just how much our personal lives are being affected by the usage of invasive technology to monitor us.  The film was made in Holland and uses local examples such as their train system. The Rotterdam tram, face recognition cameras scan passengers before they can board. The purpose is to identify “unwanted” passengers but most people boarding the trolleys are completely unaware of that this invasive system not only exists but can even record your conversations.  Other Dutch examples include: highways lined with cameras as part of the Automatic Number Plate Recognition. Then there’s Deep Packet Inspection that analyzes electronic traffic, and keeps tabs of your Internet activity.“

The RHG Film & Discussion Series is co-sponsored by the UNI Center for Multicultural Education and UNI Rod Library.  All series events are free and open to the public.

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 7:00 pm

Holocaust survivor and artist Miriam Brysk will share her story in a presentation, "Survival in the Russian Partisans of the Lipiczany Forest."  

Brysk, born in Warsaw, survived the LIda ghetto and and the Partisans of Belorussia. She came to America in 1947 at age 12, with no previous schooling and unable to speak English. Her two dreams in life were to become a scientist and an artist. She obtained her Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from Columbia University and went on to become a scientist and medical school professor at the University of Texas. Since her retirement and return to Ann Arbor, she has become a digital artist and writer depicting the plight of the Jews during the Holocaust. She has created three major art exhibits: “In a Confined Silence”, “Children of the Holocaust”, and “Scroll of Remembrance” and has had nearly 35 solo exhibits. Some of her work is part of the permanent collection of Yad Vashem.

She has published two books: Amidst the Shadows of Trees: A Holocaust Child’s Survival in the Partisans, an autobiography; and The Stones Weep: Teaching the Holocaust through a Survivor’s Art, an art book with lesson plans by co-author Margaret Lincoln. She is completing her third book, Reflections on the Holocaust. Brysk will be introduced by Holocaust educator Margaret Lincoln, co-author of The Stones Weep

Brysk's latest exhibit, "Scroll of Remembrance," along with selected other works of hers, will be on display at the Grout Museum of History & Science in Waterloo at the time of her visit.

Her presentation is free and open to the public. The presentation will be followed by a book signing and reception.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 - 7:00 pm

This film explores the burgeoning green future made possible through clean technology. VPRO Backlight travels the world in search of this new future.

Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 4:00 pm

The Instrumental Analysis Class of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry will hold their 2nd Annual Poster Session "Instrumentation in Extreme Environments. Refreshments will be served.

Thursday, April 23, 2015 - 9:00 pm to 10:00 pm

View the night sky through the computer controlled telescope at the Earth and Environmental Science Observatory. This event is free and open to the public. Meet before 9 p.m. to get to the observatory (near the polar bear). No late admissions will be allowed; no food or drink and no cellphones or other electronic devices can be used during the observatory visit.

Monday, April 27, 2015 - 6:30 pm

As part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Women's and Gender Studies and Wellness and Recreation Services will host a screening and discussion of "The Mask You Live In." This documentary, from the makers of "Miss Representation," follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity. These gender stereotypes interconnect with race, class and circumstance, creating a maze of identity issues boys and young men must navigate to become “real” men. "The Mask You Live In" ultimately illustrates how we, as a society, can raise a healthier generation of boys and young men.


Following the 90-minute film, Mark Rowe-Barth, Alan Heisterkamp and Michael Fleming will lead a discussion.

This event is free and open to the public. Please note this film contains content that may not be suitable to children under 16.

Monday, April 27, 2015 - 7:00 pm to Saturday, May 9, 2015 - 5:00 pm

Opening Reception: April 27 at 7 p.m. The following students are pursuing Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in their respective emphasis areas and are exhibiting new artwork to fulfill graduation requirements: Ashlie Coady and Sarah Etringer (printmaking), Estephania González (performance art), and Kelsey Sorensen (ceramics).

Monday, April 27, 2015 - 7:00 pm to Saturday, May 9, 2015 - 5:00 pm

Artists' depiction of animals document and interrogate human-animal relationships to reflect historical, political, ethical, and epistemological dimensions of what it means to be human and animal. Co-curated by Dr. Elizabeth Sutton and gallery director Darrell Taylor. Located in Gallery A.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 12:00 pm

Russell Guay, Department of Management, will present “To Whom Does Transformational Leadership Matter More?  An Examination of Neurotic and Introverted Followers and Their Organizational Citizenship.” Bring your lunch; cookies will be provided.

In a sample of 215 leaders and 1,284 followers, the positive relationship between transformational leadership and organizational citizenship behavior was stronger for those who are introverted or neurotic than those who are extraverted or emotionally stable. Therefore, transformational leaders can guide these employees to perform more OCB despite their tendencies to worry, lack confidence, and be shy and withdrawn. 

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 3:15 pm

Xavi Escandell, associate professor of sociology, will present "Gender Gaps in Educational Outcomes Among Children of New Migrants: The Role of Social Integration from a Comparative Perspective."

Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm

"The Hunting Ground" is a documentary that exposes the fight for justice against sexual assault on college campuses through the eyes of the victim. The film premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and since then has been screened on multiple college campuses across the United States. The film sparks discussion around issues of sexual assault and the role of the university in investigating and aiding the victims of rape. The film was subsequently picked up by CNN, who will feature the film in an upcoming special. 

Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 7:00 pm

The UNI College of Education will sponser a lecture featuring Jonathan Kozol, a known author on the experiences of children living in impoverished communities. He will share strategies for what we can do in classrooms and beyond to support the nation's poorest children. This event is in conjunction with the Education Summit being held May 1, 2015. 

Thursday, April 30, 2015 - 9:00 pm to 10:00 pm

View the night sky through the computer controlled telescope at the Earth and Environmental Science Observatory. This event is free and open to the public. Meet before 9 p.m. to get to the observatory (near the polar bear). No late admissions will be allowed; no food or drink and no cellphones or other electronic devices can be used during the observatory visit. This is the last show of the semester.

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