Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education

May 15, 2011 (Volume 1, Issue 6)

University of Northern Iowa

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 Volume 1  •  Issue 6  •  May 15, 2011
 

 

 ANNOUNCEMENTS


Exhibit

Now through June 4
Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum (Grout Museum District)
Waterloo
To commemorate the 65th anniversary of the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal, the Grout Museum District and the CHGE are sponsoring an exhibit, "Pursuing Justice: Nuremberg's Legacy." The exhibit was created by the Florida Holocaust Museum. Related events, including a presentation by Gregory S. Gordon, an expert in international humanitarian law and justice, and a film series on the Nuremberg Trials have been organized.

Film Screening
Thursday, June 2, 7 p.m.
Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum (Grout Museum District)
Waterloo
In conjunction with the exhibit, "Pursuing Justice: Nuremberg's Legacy" (see announcement above), the film "Nuremberg" will be shown. "Nuremberg" is a 2000 Canadian/United States television docudrama starring Alec Baldwin as Justice Robert H. Jackson. The film has been praised by several critics for its attention to historical accuracy. Brian Cox won an Emmy for his portrayal of Hermann Goering. This event is free and open to the public.  

Teaching About the Holocaust and the Iowa Core Curriculum
Wednesday, June 15, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Innovative Teaching and Technology Center, UNI
Workshop funded and led by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum for Iowa teachers of social studies.  

 INFORMATION FOR EDUCATORS


Using readers' and experts' suggestions, The Jewish Daily Forward has created The Thinking Person's Guide to the Holocaust. The list includes paintings, novels, memoirs, films, poems and graphic works, as well as historical studies. Thus, according to Dan Freidman, the list reflects the view that "Reading literature without knowing history is impossible. One cannot appreciate the literature of the Holocaust without a grounding in its history. But conversely, one cannot understand the Holocaust without the insight of witnesses and great artistic or literary figures."

Holocaust education state profile: Kansas

Like many states, Kansas has no legislation on the teaching of the Holocaust. However, since 1999 the Holocaust has been listed in benchmarks and indicators for Kansas Curricular Standards for History and Government; Economics and Geography in Grades 7-12. In the most recent (2004) version of these standards, Benchmark 2—"The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments and turning points in the era of the Great Depression through World War II in United States history (1930-1945)"—for High School includes, as a Knowledge indicator, "American reaction to atrocities of Holocaust and unwillingness to accept Jewish refugees." Benchmark 3—"The student uses a working knowledge and understanding of individuals, groups, ideas, developments and turning points of the Era of World War (1914-1945)"--includes, as an Application indicator, "[the ability to analyze] the causes and immediate consequences of WWII (e.g., German, Italian and Japanese aggression; failure of the League of Nations; appeasement; development of American, British-Soviet alliance; Holocaust; Nanjing; introduction of nuclear weapons; war crime trials)." For more information, go to the Kansas State Department of Education website and search under the topic "History/Government/Social Studies."   

 NEWS DIGEST


Moshe Landau Dies at 99; Oversaw Eichmann Trial
Moshe Landau, the presiding judge in the war-crimes trial of Adolf Eichmann, died at his home in Jerusalem on Sunday, the eve of Israel's Holocaust Remembrance Day. He was 99. A refugee from Nazi Germany, Justice Landau was the head of a three-judge panel overseeing the Eichmann trial, which ran from April through August 1961. The panel also included Benjamin Halevy and Yitzhak Raveh. Read more...

50 Years After Trial, Eichmann Secrets Live On
Germany is famous for confronting its Nazi past. But confronting the years after the war is another matter. The latest proof comes as the country's foreign intelligence agency, the BND, refuses to declassify several thousand secret files detailing what Adolf Eichmann, the high-ranking Nazi who helped orchestrate the Holocaust, was doing between 1945 and his capture by Mossad agents in Buenos Aires in 1960. Read more...

Demjanjuk Convicted for Role in Nazi Death Camp
In what may be one of the last major Nazi war crimes trials, a German court sentenced John Demjanjuk, a former autoworker in Ohio, to five years in prison after he was found guilty of taking part in the murder of 28,000 people while working as a guard at the Sobibor concentration camp in Nazi-occupied Poland in 1943. Read more...

Lawmakers Introduce Holocaust Education Funding Bill
Lawmakers in both houses of the U.S. Congress introduced a bill that would budget $10 million for Holocaust education over five years. Read more...

Looted Nazi Art Records Go Online
Records about stolen artworks taken during World War II are to be placed on an international database so items can be traced. It is hoped publishing the documents online will help families and historians find missing items seized by the Nazis. The National Archives and the Commission for Looted Art have signed an agreement to provide the documents. The files, dated between 1939 and 1961, feature inventories and images of art. The records also include details about efforts to identify and recover the articles during and after World War II. Read more...

U.S. Department of State Displays Artwork by David Feinberg
Life Is Struggle, made through University of Minnesota professor David Feinberg's Voice to Vision collaborative studio project involving Holocaust and genocide survivors, has been chosen for display by the U.S. Department of State's ART in Embassies Program. It will be displayed at the U.S. Embassy in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, Spring 2011-Fall 2013. Read the full press release and the Artist's Statement.

Hannah Rosenthal: Six Worrisome Trends in Global Anti-Semitism
President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have given me the great honor of being the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. They have a strong commitment to fighting anti-Semitism and all forms of hatred. I have been on the job almost a year and a half and have witnessed six significant trends in the increases of anti-Semitism around the world. Read more...  

Libyan Leaders to Face Arrest Warrants for Alleged War Crimes
The chief prosecutor for the International Criminal Court said in a report that there are "reasonable grounds to believe that crimes against humanity have been committed and continue being committed in Libya." The report identified the alleged commission of rape by Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's government, as well as the deportation or forcible transfer of citizens during the civil war that continues to rage in that country. It also noted war crimes, including intentionally directing attacks against civilians not participating in the fighting. Read more...

How Many Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) Are There in Darfur?
The simple answer to the question "how many internally displaced persons are there in Darfur?" is easy: we don't know, and we don't know the margin of error for various figures that have been published by the UN in the past.Read more...

South Sudan Faces Tough Self-Inflicted Challenges Months to Independence 
Despite a successful self-determination vote that led to the creation of Africa's newest state, pent-up grievances and emerging political disputes pose transitional challenges that could derail independence celebrations.Read more...

A Test for Universal Jurisdiction: War Crimes in Africa on Trial in Germany
The trial of two Rwandan rebel leaders accused of ordering war crimes in eastern Congo opened in Stuttgart on Wednesday. Human rights activists are watching the proceedings closely. They are seen as a vital test of the principal of universal jurisdiction, which allow war criminals to be tried anywhere in the world. Read more...

In Kansas Courtroom, Echoes of Rwanda Genocide
The faces in the jury box are a cross-section of southern Kansas. The jurors have been asked to decide whether a former teacher and mill owner born in Burundi, incited local Hutu farmers in Rwanda to turn on their Tutsi neighbors in the turbulent days of April 1994. Mr. Kobagaya, who is 84, is not being charged with genocide but with lying to immigration officials about his involvement to obtain American citizenship in 2006. Read more...

JTA's New Digital News Archive Marks Historic First
Known today as the massacre at Babi Yar, the killing near Kiev of tens of thousands of Jews by German troops at the end of September 1941 is remembered today as one of the most grisly chapters of the Holocaust in Ukraine. In the weeks after the slaughter, however, the world did not know. Historians believe it was a Nov. 16, 1941, dispatch from JTA - published without a byline and with the dateline "Somewhere in Europe" - that broke the news to the West and English-speaking readers. That first report of the massacre at Babi Yar is one of more than 250,000 JTA articles from 1923 to the present that are now available online as part of JTA's new digital news archive. Read more...

Bosnia and Herzegovina Facing Worst Crisis in Years, Security Council Hears
Bosnia and Herzegovina is facing its worst crisis since fighting stopped in 1995, with no prospect of a new state government being formed, a stalled economy and a direct threat from Republika Srpska to the country's very existence, the Security Council heard on May 9. Valentin Inzko, the High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, said that Republika Srpska—one of two semi-autonomous entities that comprise the country—has taken "concrete actions which represent the most serious violation of the Dayton Paris Peace Agreement" since the pact was signed at the end of 1995.Read more...
 

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Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education
University of Northern Iowa
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