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UNI Calendar of Events

Exhibits, Films and Lectures Calendar

Tuesday, October 21, 2014 - 8:00 pm

Eric Cline is the author of this year's common read, "Ready Player One," which is associated with the Reaching for Higher Ground theme for the academic year, Social Media. A book signing follows the keynote. Event is free and open to all UNI students, faculty, staff and the general public.

Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Charles Ogletree, the Harvard Law School Jesse Climenko Professor of Law and founding and executive director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, will speak on the subject of access to modern technology. Ogletree received the first Rosa Parks Civil Rights Award, given by the City of Boston; and Morehouse College's Gandhi, King, Ikeda Community Builders Prize. Ogletree earned BA and  MA degrees in political science from Stanford University, where he was Phi Beta Kappa. He also holds a JD from Harvard Law School where he served as Special Projects Editor of the Harvard Civil Rights - Civil Liberties Law Review. His visit is part of the Center for Multicultural Education's Annual Lecture Series, and doubles as a speaker for the Reaching for Higher Ground project. The theme of that project for the 2014-2015 academic year is "Media and Social Media." 

Thursday, October 23, 2014 - 9:00 pm

View the night sky at the McCollum Science Hall Observatory. Meet by the polar bear near room 137 before the start of the show (late arrivals will not be able to attend).

Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Steve Heilmann, research associate in the College of Biological Sciences at the University of Minnesota, will present "Hydrothermal Carbonization - An Industrial Process?"

Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 7:00 pm

Sean Thomas Dougherty is the author or editor of 13 books across genres including All I Ask for Is Longing: Poems 1994-2014, Scything Grace and Sasha Sings the Laundry on the Line. Open mic sign up is at 7 p.m. Share your best five minutes of original poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction. The featured author takes the stage at 8 p.m.

Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 9:00 pm

View the night sky at the McCollum Science Hall Observatory. Meet by the polar bear near room 137 before the start of the show (late arrivals will not be able to attend).

Monday, November 3, 2014 - 12:20 pm

Danielle McGeough, assistant professor of communication studies, will present "Pots and Purity: Performing the Domestic Goddess in the 19th Century." Faculty, staff, students and the public are welcome.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014 - 3:30 pm

Bridgette Bates will read from her poetry collection What Is Not Missing Is Light, which takes the reader inside a museum to view fragments of statues that have become emblematic of historical and cultural decay and perseverance. 

Bridgette Bates’ poems have appeared in the Boston Review, Fence, jubilat, VERSE and elsewhere. A recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship and a “Discovery” Prize, she is a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Originally from Nashville, she lives in Los Angeles where she is the writer-in-residence at the Library Foundation of Los Angeles and a frequent features contributor to the Kirkus Reviews. Bates’ debut collection, What Is Not Missing Is Light, winner of Rescue Press’ Black Box Poetry Prize, will be released this November.

Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Chemistry and biochemistry Students Jon Heinzman, Katie Fay and Angela Weepie will present posters from their 2014 Summer Undergraduate Research.

Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 7:00 pm

Damien Pfister, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and author of Networked Media, Networked Rhetorics: Attention and Deliberation in the Early Blogosphere, will present a lecture on Google Glass. Google Glass is an augmented reality technology that allows wearers to seamlessly access internetworked media through displays built into the lenses. This kind of "wearable computer," like activity trackers, miniature cameras and smart wristwatches, is on the cusp of ubiquity in intensively networked societies. However, public discussion about the cultural implications of these new technologies is lagging behind their development and diffusion. In the context of Glass, Pfister will pursue one of the most substantive critiques of communication in a networked society: that digital media technologies enable citizens to customize their environments, thus creating "echo chambers" or "filter bubbles" that may curtail the very possibilities for social justice.

Monday, November 10, 2014 - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

The Reaching for Higher Ground Film & Discussion Series explores topics related to the 2014-15 RHG theme Media and Social Media: A Networked Society.

This evening Joystick Warriors: Video Games, Violence & the Culture of Militarism will be screened and serve as the basis for personal reflection and dialogue. 

“For years, there's been widespread speculation about the relationship between violent video games and violence in the real world. Joystick Warriors provides the clearest account yet of the latest research on this issue. Drawing on the insights of media scholars, military analysts, combat veterans, and gamers themselves, the film trains its sights on the wildly popular genre of first-person shooter games, exploring how the immersive experience they offer links up with the larger stories we tell ourselves as a culture about violence, militarism, guns, and manhood. Along the way, it examines the game industry's longstanding working relationship with the U.S. military and the American gun industry, and offers a riveting examination of the games themselves -- showing how they work to sanitize, glamorize, and normalize violence while cultivating dangerously regressive attitudes and ideas about masculinity and militarism.”

The RHG Film & Discussion Series is co-sponsored by the UNI Center for Multicultural Education and UNI Rod Library.  All series events are free and open to the public.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 7:00 pm

Joshua Waddle, John Deere Museum, will present "Public History Meets Corporate Culture:  Telling the John Deere Waterloo Works Story." The event is free and open to the public.

Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Jack Vaughey, materials scientist at Argonne National Lab, will present "Materials Chemists Role in Support of Renewable Energy."

Tuesday, November 18, 2014 - 7:00 pm

Dr. Thomas King is an author who often writes and also advocates for First Nation causes. His book, The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account, is an unconventional assessment of Indian-White relations in North America. This book is featured in our book club this year. King is also Professor Emeritus from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. He earned his bachelor and masters degrees from Chico State University and earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Utah.  

 

Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Randall Goldsmith, chemistry professor at the University of Wisconsin, will present "Adventures in Single Molecule Spectroscopy:  Catalysts, Proteins and Photonics!"

Thursday, November 20, 2014 - 7:00 pm

Grant Tracey is the author of several collections of fiction including Lovers & Strangers and Playing Mac: A Novella in Two Acts. A longtime fiction editor of the North American Review, Tracey has also written and directed the play According to Chelsea. Open mic signup is at 7p.m. Share your best five minutes of original poetry, fiction or creative nonfiction. The featured author takes the stage at 8 p.m.

Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 4:00 pm

Chemistry and biochemistry students Kylene Carlson, Robin Livermore and Allison Wold will present posters from their 2014 Summer Undergraduate Research.

Monday, January 26, 2015 - 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

The Reaching for Higher Ground Film & Discussion Series explores topics related to the 2014-15 RHG theme Media and Social Media: A Networked Society.  

This evening Rise of the Drones will be screened and serve as the basis for personal reflection and dialogue:  “Drones. These unmanned flying robots–some as large as jumbo jets, others as small as birds–do things straight out of science fiction. Much of what it takes to get these robotic airplanes to fly, sense, and kill has remained secret. But now, with rare access to drone engineers and those who fly them for the U.S. military, NOVA reveals the amazing technologies that make drones so powerful as we see how a remotely-piloted drone strike looks and feels from inside the command center. From cameras that can capture every detail of an entire city at a glance to swarming robots that can make decisions on their own to giant air frames that can stay aloft for days on end, drones are changing our relationship to war, surveillance, and each other. And it's just the beginning.’”

The RHG Film & Discussion Series is co-sponsored by the UNI Center for Multicultural Education and UNI Rod Library.  All series events are free and open to the public.



Tuesday, January 27, 2015 - 7:00 pm

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad is the director of the Schomburg Center for Research on Black Culture of the New York Public Library. His book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, discusses the emergence of the deeply embedded notions of black people as a dangerous race of criminals in contrast to working-class whites and European immigrants. Muhammad will also be speaking at 3:30 p.m. at an informal book discussion prior to his keynote address.   

Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 7:00 pm

Michael Childers, UNI Department of History, will present "Rich Man's Games, Poor Man's Taxes:  Growth and Colorado's Rejection of the 1976 Winter Olympic Games."  The event is free and open to the public.

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