down arrowMenu

UNI Calendar of Events

Center for Multicultural Education

Guest Lecturer: Pawan Dhingra

Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority population in the country. They provide a wonderful lens to the experiences of immigrants and minorities in the United States both historically and today. In "Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives," co-written with Robyn Magalit Rodriguez, Dhingra critically examines social hierarchies (of race, gender, and sexuality), work, education, family, culture, identity, media, pan-ethnicity, social movements and politics. Dhingra is a professor of sociology and american studies and Chair of the Department of Sociology at Tufts University.

Guest Lecturer: Pawan Dhingra

Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority population in the country. They provide a wonderful lens to the experiences of immigrants and minorities in the United States both historically and today. In "Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives," co-written with Robyn Magalit Rodriguez, Dhingra critically examines social hierarchies (of race, gender, and sexuality), work, education, family, culture, identity, media, pan-ethnicity, social movements and politics. Dhingra is a professor of sociology and american studies and Chair of the Department of Sociology at Tufts University.

CME Book Club

"Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives" by Pawan Dhingra and Robyn Magalit Rodriguez

Asian Americans are the fastest-growing racial group in the United States. They now outnumber Latinos among the newly arrived immigrants. In Asian America, Pawan Dhingra and Robyn Rodriguez synthesize a prodigious amount of research and analysis, providing a wide-ranging overview of key issues and debates surrounding Asian Americans.

CME Book Club

"Somebody's Children: The Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption" by Laura Briggs   

"Somebody’s Children" examines the growth of transracial and transnational adoption in the United states since 1945 and challenges dominant understanding of these practices. Briggs suggests that the popular narrative of abandoned or orphaned children being rescued by predominantly white, middle–class Americans is problematic, representing a cultural fantasy rather than reality. 

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Center for Multicultural Education
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
28