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UNI Calendar of Events

Executive Vice President and Provost

Graduate College Brown Bag Lecture: "Invention through Form and Function Analogy: Strategies for Generating Creative Ideas"

Audrey Rule, professor, Department of Curriculum & Instruction, will present "Invention through Form and Function Analogy: Strategies for Generating Creative Ideas."

State and national economies depend upon innovations and inventions. Many inventors draw ideas from nature, connecting natural forms (colors, shapes, configurations, textures) to their functions. A brief overview of Rule’s book "Invention through Form and Function Analogy" (with explanation of how to obtain a free copy) will be followed by participants using card sets to generate new ideas for improving simple product. Bring your lunch; cookies will be provided.

Cedar Valley 1 Million Cups Kick Off

Join us for our official Cedar Valley 1 Million Cups kick off event. This event is free and open to the public.

1 Million Cups (1MC) is a simple way to engage entrepreneurs in communities around the world. Each week, the 1MC program offers two local entrepreneurs an opportunity to present their startups to a diverse audience of mentors, advisors and entrepreneurs. Presenters prepare a six-minute educational presentation and engage in 20 minutes of feedback and questioning after the presentation. Entrepreneurs gain insight into possible ways they can improve their businesses, gather realtime feedback, connect with a community that truly cares about their progress and walk away feeling like they have advanced their business. The audience also learns a great deal from the presentations. Whether this is through passively listening or deeply engaging with the entrepreneurs, there is much to learn every week from these dynamic and diverse communities.

There will also be a soft launch the mornings of Nov. 5 and Nov. 12 at 9 a.m. 

Working with Small Group Dynamics in the Classroom

Alison Bianchi, University of Iowa, will discuss working with small group dynamics in the classroom. Herresearch focuses on how social inequalities at the societal level, especially those general axes of inequality including race, class and gender, create structural inequalities at the small group level. Knowing how these processes can emerge how do we form small groups of students so that all can freely participate, be included and learn? How might we even begin the conversation with students about such sensitive topics? Bianchi will present snippets of her theory-driven research, as well as practical interventions that ameliorate structural inequalities, based on the research. Her approach: well-intentioned intervention strategies often fail to break the structures of group-level inequality. Interventions based on supported theory really work! Let’s explore your options, so that youare empowered to combat the deleterious effects of cultural belief systems that advantage some and disadvantage others. Register for this event by clicking the “Register Now” button on the CETL website or by visiting unicetl.eventbrite.com. 

Internationalizing UNI's Curriculum: A Faculty Panel

Peter Berendzen, biology; Tammy Gregersen, languages and literatures; Konrad Sadkowski, history; and Chris Schrage, marketing, will discuss how they understand the idea of “internationalizing the curriculum,” why they think it’s important and what kinds of initiatives might further enhance our students’ preparation for careers where global knowledge and intercultural skills are expected. We live in an increasingly diverse world and with UNI growing its international student population, all of our students benefit from a curriculum that helps them successfully interact with many different cultures and people. Co-sponsored by the International Students and Scholars Office. Registration not required. 

Inquiry-Based Learning: Principles and Practice

Inquiry-based learning (IBL) is a set of course design principles that focuses engaging students in sense-making activities. There is typically very little lecture, and instead students are given a carefully constructed sequence of tasks to complete which require them to figure things out and make arguments in the same way that experienced professionals do. Recent large scale studies of IBL mathematics courses have shown that IBL teaching has a positive effect; the ideas are general enough that they can be applied to most disciplines. In this short workshop, we will discuss why one should consider IBL teaching, and begin figuring out some ways to use the ideas in our own classrooms. We can also discuss some of the potential challenges for instructors and students. Facilitated by TJ Hitchman, math department. Register for this event by clicking the “Register Now” button on the CETL website or visiting unicetl.eventbrite.com.

Re-Visiting the Classics on Diversity and Inclusion: Session Three

In "Toward a New Sociology of Masculinity," Tim Carrigan, Bob Connell and John Lee explore the history of ideas of masculinity, both in the context of feminism, and in the history and culture of gender and gender roles before the advent of feminism. This article is an excellent presentation of sociological approaches to the field of men’s studies. One of the authors, R.W. Connell, has become the leading figure internationally in masculinity studies. The article is available on the CETL website by clicking the calendar event for this session. Facilitator: Harry Brod (CSBS)

The CAT Classroom: Why YOU Might Want to Use this Room

The Collaborative, Active learning, Transformational (CAT) Classroom in Bartlett Hall is a classroom that takes face-to-face teaching with technology to a new level. With four round tables that seat six students each, a Smart Board, networked laptops and a dedicated wall-mounted monitor for each table and an instructor's station at the center of the room, the CAT Classroom allows faculty to engage students in using technology for learning during class. Session facilitators will demonstrate assignments that they’ve developed for use in the room and discuss the benefits and challenges of using the CAT classroom. Facilitated by Kim Baker, sociology, anthropology and criminology; Martie Reineke, philosophy and world religions; and Marybeth Stalp, sociology, anthropology and criminology. Registration not required.

 

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