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UNI Calendar of Events

Communication Studies

"Love is a Verb" Film Screening and Producer Talk

"Love is a Verb," the award-winning 2014 film by Terry Spencer Hesser and narrated by Ashley Judd, will be screened. 

The film examines peacebuilding in a world of conflict, and the social movement of Sufi inspired Sunni Muslims that began in Turkey in the 1960s and now reaches across the globe. The group is called Hizmet, the Turkish word for service, or The Gulen Movement after its inspiration, leader and teacher Fethullah Gulen, a man that Time Magazine named as one of the most influential leaders in the world in 2013.

The screening and talk is sponsored by the Niagara Foundation and the Turkish Student Association of UNI.

Q&A with Sean Lewis

Sean Christopher Lewis is the artistic director of Working Group Theatre and  winner of the 2013 Rick Graf Award from the Human Rights Commission. His previous monologues and plays have won the Kennedy Center’s Rosa Parks Award, the National New Play Network Smith Prize, the NEA Voices in Community Award, the Barrymore Award, the Central Ohio Critic Circle Award and more. His plays have been performed at major theaters, colleges, prisons, detention centers and living rooms in the United States, Canada, East Africa and Europe.

He can be heard as a contributor to NPR’S “This American Life,” and his work has appeared in the New York Times, Huffington Post and numerous literary journals.

Sean Lewis will perform "Dogs of Rwanda" in the Interpreters Theatre March 26 and 27.

Film Screening: "Ricki's Promise"

The film "Ricki's Promise," is the story of an 18-year-old Asian woman, born in China but raised in the U.S., who embarks upon an emotional journey as she navigates the conflicting worlds of two cultures. A documentary written, directed and produced by Changfu Chang, the film follows the journey of Ricki's return to China to live with her long-lost birth parents during a summer vacation. Discussion with the director follows the screening. 

Chang is a professor in the Department of Communication and Theatre at Millersville University of Pennsylvania. Chang’s research interests focus on communication, culture and technology, and their relationship to modernity and globalization. He is an awarding-winning documentary filmmaker, especially on the topic of international adoption.

According to a statistical report by the Bureau of Consular Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, since 1999 families in the United States have adopted 249,694 international children, 2,893 of whom are living in Iowa. Among those children, about 28.7% were adopted from China, 18.5% from Russia, 11.9% from Guatemala, 7.8% from South Korea, 5.6% from Ethiopia, 3.9% from Ukraine, 2.1% from India, more than 5.5% from other Asian countries and the rest from other locations.

The event is sponsored by the Reaching for Higher Ground series; the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President; the Center for Multicultural Education; the Diversity Council; the Departments of Communication Studies and Social Work; the College of Humanities, Arts and Sciences; the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences; and the Dean of Students.

Funny...As a Crutch?

Laughter is often a nervous reaction to subjects our society finds taboo. We laugh at inappropriate times, make self-deprecating jokes about our human frailties and hide behind our laughter. Through the performance of poetry, personal narrative and drama (and relying on a bit of humor), "Funny.....as a Crutch?" challenges audiences to rethink the role humor plays in revealing (or masking) our attitudes toward our own mental and physical (dis)abilities.

Funny...As a Crutch?

Laughter is often a nervous reaction to subjects our society finds taboo. We laugh at inappropriate times, make self-deprecating jokes about our human frailties and hide behind our laughter. Through the performance of poetry, personal narrative and drama (and relying on a bit of humor), "Funny.....as a Crutch?" challenges audiences to rethink the role humor plays in revealing (or masking) our attitudes toward our own mental and physical (dis)abilities.

Funny...As a Crutch?

Laughter is often a nervous reaction to subjects our society finds taboo. We laugh at inappropriate times, make self-deprecating jokes about our human frailties and hide behind our laughter. Through the performance of poetry, personal narrative and drama (and relying on a bit of humor), "Funny.....as a Crutch?" challenges audiences to rethink the role humor plays in revealing (or masking) our attitudes toward our own mental and physical (dis)abilities.

Dogs of Rwanda

In 1994, David found himself in Uganda as a church missionary. When he followed the girl of his dreams into the woods to help a Rwandan child, he entered a world from which he will never fully be able to escape. Twenty years after surviving the genocide, a note from the Rwandan boy he once tried to save arrived, "You didn't tell them everything," it said. A dinner party story for all ages. 

Dogs of Rwanda

In 1994, David found himself in Uganda as a church missionary. When he followed the girl of his dreams into the woods to help a Rwandan child, he entered a world from which he will never fully be able to escape. Twenty years after surviving the genocide, a note from the Rwandan boy he once tried to save arrived, "You didn't tell them everything," it said. A dinner party story for all ages. 

The Soul Food Museum

This interactive performance brings to light the magic, politics, and ritual of an African-American Sunday dinner. A challenge to mass-mediated stereotypes of the Black family and Black life, "The Soul Food Museum" invites us to laugh, eat and share. Learned in his childhood, graduate student DeRod Taylor prepares for us his own Sunday Dinner as we navigate Black life and the power of family.

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