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News Release Archive

September 6, 2004 - 7:00pm

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City, Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 14 and 15. Specific times for discussion of most items are unknown. The docket is available on the Web at www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html

1. Academic program review/student outcomes assessment

Contact:

Aaron Podolefsky, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, (319) 273-2517

2. Master's of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Development

UNI plans to offer a Master's of Philanthropy and Nonprofit Development, if approved by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. It will be a multi-disciplinary program offered through the UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, via the Iowa Communications Network. According to James Bodensteiner, dean of Continuing Education and Special Programs, philanthropy is a rapidly growing career area, but those interested in the field have limited choices for graduate education. Bodensteiner expects the majority of the students in the program to be working adults. He said the program will not require extra staff.

Contact:

Christopher Edginton, director, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services,

(319) 273-2840

3. Annual report on faculty resignations

UNI is proud of its ability to attract and retain quality faculty. We are at our goal of having 75 percent tenured and tenure-track faculty in the classroom. With only 10 faculty resignations during 2003-04 -- the lowest number in a decade -- it appears our efforts to retain faculty have been effective.

Contact:

Aaron Podolefsky, provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, (319) 273-2517

4. Annual report on phased and early retirement

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

5. Annual Regents merit system report

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

6. Annual salary report

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

7. Annual report on fringe benefits

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

8. Revised state-funded five-year capital plan

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

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Contact:

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728

September 2, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A director/designer presentation for 'Ubu Roi' the upcoming Theatre UNI production, will take place at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 8 in the Bertha Martin Theatre on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

The presentation will allow director Scott Nice, UNI assistant professor of theatre, and his production designers to share their vision and interpretation of the spoof on Shakespeare's 'Macbeth,' which will have a circus theme fit for the whole family. The Theatre UNI production will run Oct. 7-10 and 13-17.

The presentation is free and open to the public. For more information contact Jascenna Haislet-Carlson at (319) 273-6387.

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August 31, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A conference to provide information on new degree programs, called professional science master's (PSM) degrees, which are intended to prepare students for careers in industry, will take place Friday, Sept. 10, at the University of Northern Iowa.

The day-long Conference on Professional Science Master's Programs in Industrial Mathematics and Applied Physics will begin at 8:45 a.m., in Central Ballroom C of UNI's Maucker Union. Its purposes are to explain the benefits of the PSM degree to representatives of Cedar Valley businesses and industries and to obtain input from them on what skills graduates need to succeed in industry.

'This new degree is tailored to preparing students for a wider variety of career options than provided by current graduate programs in math and science,' said Jerry Ridenhour, head of the UNI Department of Mathematics. 'The focus is on Iowa business, and the industrial mathematics program will be designed to prepare students to work in the manufacturing sector.'

The two-year interdisciplinary degree will require coursework in the subject area (math or physics) and in business as well as some form of experiential learning, according to Cliff Chancey, head of the UNI Department of Physics. 'This will give students experience in dealing with real problems,' he said.

Highlights of the conference will include presentations by Les Sims of the Council of Graduate Schools on PSM programs, Robert Hogg of the University of Iowa on industrial mathematics, and Chris Sorenson of Kansas State University on nanotechnology. The conference also will feature concurrent sessions on industrial mathematics and applied physics, and a panel discussion.

Registration for the conference, which includes lunch, dinner and parking, is free of charge, but participants must register before Sept. 6 for free parking. To register, contact Nan Sash at 273-7650 (nan.sash@uni.edu).



Last winter, the Departments of Mathematics and Physics were each awarded $5,000 by the Sloan Foundation and the Council of Graduate Schools to explore the feasibility of offering a PSM degree in industrial mathematics and applied physics, respectively. The conference is funded by the grants.

Throughout the spring and summer, Ridenhour and Chancey have surveyed and visited state and regional businesses about their needs for science master's-level employees and have worked with those employers to design an appropriate education package. If they decide to pursue the PSM, the departments can apply for implementation grants from the Sloan Foundation and the Council of Graduate Schools.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– The University of Northern Iowa's annual volunteer fair, will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 8, in the Old Central Ballroom in Maucker Union.

The event, offering students service opportunities within the Cedar Valley, is hosted by Volunteer UNI of UNI's Advising and Career Services. More than 70 non-profit organizations are expected to attend the fair, which typically draws more than 500 students, according to Jinger Bremer, a graduate student from Battle Creek, and Volunteer UNI program coordinator.

Non-profit organizations will provide a wide range of volunteer opportunities for students and student organizations. For a complete listing of organizations at the fair, visit www.uni.edu/careercenter or contact Libby Vanderwall, events coordinator, UNI Advising and Career Services, at (319) 273-6857.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– 'Ending Exclusion: How Women's Workplace Activism Built the Women's Movement and Changed the Country,' will be the topic of the 31st Annual Carl L. Becker Memorial Lecture in History at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 8, in Seerley Hall, Room 115, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Nancy Maclean, associate professor of history and African-American studies at Northwestern University, will deliver the lecture. Maclean received her B.A and M.A. degrees in history from Brown University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She has been teaching at Northwestern University since 1989.

Maclean's lecture is based on her forthcoming book Freedom is Not Enough: How the Fight Over Jobs and Justice Changed America, which will be published in 2005. She has had articles published in The Nation, Feminist Studies, The Journal of American History, The Journal of Women's History, Gender and History, and Labor History. Maclean has also received several awards for her research.

The memorial history lecture is given in honor of the late Carl L. Becker, a native of Reinbeck, and a distinguished scholar and teacher who became on of America's most respected historians. He is most commonly known for warning people not to become slaves to weapons of mechanical power in fear they may, in the end, destroy themselves.

The Becker Memorial Lecture marks the first in the 2004-2005 History Lecture Series, sponsored by the UNI Department of History, UNI History Club and Phi Alpha Theta history honorary organization. The Becker Lecture is supported by the Donald and Alleen Howard Endowment Fund, in the UNI Foundation.

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August 24, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– The University of Northern Iowa Wellness and Recreational Services Department announced Allison Hansen of Yarmouth and Ericka Sproul of Missouri Valley employees of the month for April 2004.

Hansen, a senior leisure services major, is a learn-to-swim instructor, and was cited for her superior customer service skills and ability to get small children to exceed their level of skill.

Sproul, a senior elementary education major, is a student aquatic supervisor, lifeguard, learn-to-swim instructor and learn to swim administrative assistant. She was cited for outstanding help in administering the learn-to-swim program.

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August 23, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa was recently awarded a $49,792 planning grant by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to explore the feasibility of establishing a Midwestern Undergraduate Research Center. Two UNI chemistry professors, John Bumpus and Duane Bartak, along with Bryan Larson of Des Moines University, are heading the initiative.

The program is the latest of several NSF initiatives to improve undergraduate research at primarily undergraduate institutions, according to Bumpus. Twenty planning grants were awarded nationwide. Following the planning grant, Bumpus said, UNI will apply for a full grant of $2.7 million from NSF.

The center would consist mainly of chemistry departments and a few biology departments at 15 primarily undergraduate institutions, a research institution (University of Minnesota chemistry department), a graduate research university of the health sciences (Des Moines University), two international participants, an industrial participant and the Iowa Academy of Science. UNI's Upward Bound program and its McNair Scholars program would also be involved. UNI is the lead institution.

'NSF's overall goal for the program,' said Bumpus, 'is to expand the reach of undergraduate research to include first- and second-year students and to enhance the research capacity, infrastructure and culture of participating institutions.' If a full grant proposal is funded, three regional undergraduate research centers will be established to support research collaborations at participating colleges and universities.

'By taking advantage of resources available at participating institutions, faculty members will have access to instrumentation, expertise and support for collaborative opportunities that may not be available at their own institutions,' Bartak said.

In late July a workshop was held at UNI for representatives of participating institutions to discuss the next steps. Pilot research projects involving undergraduates that demonstrate the usefulness of the regional center concept are being conducted by Bumpus in collaboration with Cindi Boyd of Hawkeye Community College (on bioinformatics) and Roy Ventullo of Wartburg College (on water bioremediation).

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa incoming freshman Caroline Bowman of Waterloo was selected as a National Association for the Self-Employed (NASE) scholarship recipient.

Bowman, a 2004 graduate of Waterloo West High School, was one of 20 students out of 320 applicants selected for the 2004 scholarship. She will receive a $4,000 scholarship for the 2004 ï¾– 2005 academic year.

Caroline's father, Frank Bowman of Impact Creative Group, is a member of NASE, that awards scholarships to members' children each year and has awarded over $ 1 million to students, since 1989.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– UNI Incoming freshman Dominique Covey of Dubuque has received a partial tuition Teacher Education Scholarship of $1,792. Covey, a 2004 graduate of Hempstead High School, is an elementary education and teaching major. She is the daughter of Brian and Michelle Covey.

Iowa high school graduates, entering the UNI College of Education, who received an ACT score of 26 or above, were eligible for the award.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The National Council for Geographic Education recently awarded Kay E. Weller, associate professor of geography at the UNI, its annual 'Distinguished Teaching Achievement (DTA) Award' for 2004.

The award was given to six university/college professors from the United States and Canada, who were selected by a panel of judges. The DTA award recognizes outstanding contributions to geographic education. Don Peterson, adjunct professor in UNI's department of geography, submitted her nomination.

Weller, also coordinator of the Geographic Alliance of Iowa (GAI), received the award for her innovative teaching methods, which include arranging interviews with professionals and students, developing classroom magazines and leading local and regional field trips. Weller took students to Waterloo and Chicago last year to compare and contrast the African-American communities within them using the OSAE method -- reading the landscape through Observation, Speculation, Analysis and Evaluation.

As coordinator of the GAI, Weller holds professional development workshops for Iowa teachers that have taken them throughout Iowa, Minnesota and Kansas, as well as Nigeria and India.

NCGE President Gwenda H. Rice, of Western Oregon University, will present Weller with a plaque at an awards banquet during the NCGE annual meeting, to be held Oct. 20-23, in Kansas City, Mo. Weller also received free registration for the conference and a one year membership in the NCGE.

NCGE was chartered in 1915 to promote geographic education at all levels of instruction. It has 3,200 members worldwide.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Northern Iowa Children's Choir (NICC) is hosting auditions, by appointment, for the 2004 - 2005 school year.

NICC is a vocal performing ensemble for students in grades three through seven. The members rehearse from 6 to 7:30 p.m., every Tuesday, at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. The choir also provides a learning experience for UNI music education students to rehearse a children's choir, enhance conducting skills, deliver or articulate instructions and announcements, and organize a performing ensemble.

The choir performs two concerts per year, as well as other arranged performances throughout Eastern Iowa. Last year, the choir performed with the Waterloo/Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra at the annual holiday pops concert and also at the Iowa Choral Director's Festival. The choir is self-supporting, operating on $50 tuition collected from each student.

Auditions can be arranged before Sept. 12, through Michelle Swanson at (319) 273-2600 or michelle.swanson@uni.edu.

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August 22, 2004 - 7:00pm

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Monday, Aug. 23

Fall semester begins.

3:15 p.m., President Koob will address the annual fall faculty meeting, Strayer Wood Theatre.

Contact: Dan Power, (319) 273-2987.

5 p.m., Welcome-back cookout, Center for Multicultural Education. Contact: Mike Bobeldyk, program coordinator, Maucker Union, (319) 273-5888.

Tuesday, Aug. 24

9 p.m., 'Hammered,' an original play about binge-drinking on college campuses; told from a student perspective. Contact: Mike Bobeldyk, (319) 273-5888.

Thursday, Aug. 26

3:30 to 5 p.m., Strayer-Wood Theatre open house. Contact: Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, director of marketing for Strayer-Wood Theatre, (319) 273-6387.

Friday, Aug. 27

5 to 8 p.m., Minority Graduate Student Association reception at the Center for Multicultural Education. Contact: Guy Sims, associate director of Maucker Union, (319) 273-2683.

Saturday, Aug. 28

10 a.m., Welcome Weekend service project at the Northeast Iowa Food Bank. Contact: Mike Bobeldyk, program coordinator, Maucker Union, (319) 273-5888.

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August 19, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- For the eighth consecutive year, the University of Northern Iowa is ranked second in the 'Midwestern Universities -- Master's' category for public universities, according to 'U.S. News & World Report's' 2005 'America's Best Colleges' guidebook.

The magazine's ranking criteria include peer assessment, academic reputation, retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, graduation-rate performance, and alumni giving rate.

UNI also ranked 17th on a combined list of public and private Midwest regional universities -- up from 18th last year.

Truman State University in Missouri was ranked first among public institutions in the 'Midwest Universities -- Master's' category, also for the eighth consecutive year.

Earlier this year, the Education Trust named UNI first among peer institutions nationally for overall high performance in graduation rates, and 'Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine' has ranked UNI among the nation's 'Top 100 Values in Public Colleges.'

'While we don't live for rankings, it's great to see our faculty and staff recognized nationally for the quality and value they provide our students,' said Robert Koob, UNI president.

'America's Best Colleges' Guidebook http://tinyurl.com/1fsc

'Midwestern Universities -- Master's' category http://tinyurl.com/6n7pr

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– At its annual awards banquet, held earlier this year, the UNI chapter of Phi Delta Kappa Educational Fraternity presented several scholarships and honored one of its members.

Jodi Thompson, a UNI entering freshman from Gladbrook, and Jennifer Butler, a Waverly-Shellrock High School graduate, planning to attend Drake University, both received the $250 Phi Delta Kappa Prospective Educator Award.

UNI junior social science education major Erin Nennig, from Independence, received the $700 Wayne P. Truesdell/Phi Delta Kappa Education Scholarship. Shamani Shikwambi, a UNI educational leadership graduate student from Namibia, received the $500 Gordon R. Rhum UNI Phi Delta Kappa Graduate Education Scholarship.

William Waack, emeritus director of teacher education at UNI, received the organization's Kappan of the Year Award.

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August 16, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Day-to-day management of the University of Northern Iowa's new centralized student services center (SSC) on the upper level of Gilchrist Hall will be one of the responsibilities for Jon Buse in his new role as assistant dean of students/director of new student programs.

Buse, who joined the UNI staff as an admissions counselor in 1992, had most recently served as assistant director of admissions for orientation and campus visits. The move brings him into the Office of the Vice President for Educational and Student Services.

According to Renee Romano, UNI vice president for educational and student services, the move increases the possibilities for expanding the orientation program to incorporate students' first-year experiences, helping students make a smooth transition between recruitment, admission and enrollment.

Buse organized the SSC team in Gilchrist. The SSC, which began operations Monday, Aug. 16, offers centralized services in financial aid, billing, student accounts, advising and career services, registration and academic records.

Buse holds bachelor's and master's degrees from UNI, the latter in student affairs.

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August 15, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Environmental Protection Agency: Small Business Regulations,' will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC).

The workshop will be presented from 4 to 6 p.m., on Monday, Aug. 30, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo. The instructors will be Chris Horan, program manager; and Jeff Beneke, waste reduction specialist, both at UNI's Iowa Waste Reduction Center (IWRC).

Small business owners and environmental professionals will obtain a general background of the environmental regulations that may apply to their operations. The workshop is offered in cooperation with the Small Business Compliance Alliance and the IWRC.

The cost is $25 per person. The registration deadline is Aug. 27. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.uni.edu/rbc/new/calendar/html.

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August 12, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– UNI's annual Welcome Week will kick off with 'Panther Fan Fest,' a meet-and-greet event with UNI coaches, athletes and free food, Friday Aug. 20 in the new southwest UNI-Dome parking lot.

'Voices for Change,' a program designed to create a safe place to talk about violence on campus, will take place Saturday, Aug. 21. 'Voices for Change' is a thought-provoking program required for all new students, according to Mike Bobeldyk, program coordinator at UNI's Maucker Union. It will be presented by the SAVE (Students Against a Violent Environment) Forum Actors, a campus-wide interactive performance group dedicated to violence prevention at UNI. The hour-long sessions begin at 10 a.m. and 1, 3 and 5 p.m., in the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center (GBPAC).

Also, Saturday, Aug. 21, the Union Plaza will be the site for a 'BBQ Blast,' with free hotdogs, chips and pop from 4 to 7 p.m. Hypnotist Jim Wand will perform at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center (GBPAC) Great Hall at 8 and 10 p.m.

UNI President Robert Koob will preside Sunday, Aug. 22, at a 4 p.m. Convocation, also in the GBPAC's Great Hall, welcoming new students to the 2004-2005 academic year. At 5 p.m., the Panther Bash will offer free food, prizes and music by the Johnny Holm Band on the lawn across from the GBPAC. A welcome reception for new and returning international students, with a traditional country roll call, will take place in the Great Hall, beginning at 7:30 p.m.

Weekday activities include:

Monday, Aug. 23 -- Welcome Back Cookout Under the Tent, 5-6:30 p.m., Center for

Multicultural Education South Lawn.

Tuesday, Aug. 24 ï¾– Hammered, an original play addressing the issue of binge drinking on college campuses from a student perspective, Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom C, at 9 p.m.

Thursday, Aug. 26 ï¾– An intramural-league softball managers meeting will take place in the Schindler Education Center, room 247, at 4 p.m.

B.A.S.I.C. (Brothers and Sisters in Christ) will meet in the Lang Hall Auditorium at 8 p.m.

A 'drive-in movie,' featuring 'Mean Girls,' is scheduled for 9 p.m. in the Quads Courtyard. Free snacks and refreshments will be provided. Rain location is Maucker Union.

Friday, Aug. 27 ï¾– All-Night Bowling from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., at Maple Lanes (University Ave.). All you-can-eat pizza, karaoke and bowling, cost $8.

A 'Welcome Weekend Service Project' to benefit the Cedar Valley Food Bank, is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 28. Students can sign-up at activities throughout the week, or at the Student Involvement and Activities Center, located in the upper level of Maucker Union. Student volunteers for the Welcome Weekend Service Project will receive a free t-shirt and lunch. Transportation will be provided. For more information, call (319) 273-2683.

Sponsors for the week's events include the UNI Women's Studies Program, Maucker Union, Student Life Team, UNI Convocation Committee, UNI Alumni Association, International Student Services, Center for Multicultural Education, Student Activities, Quad Residence System and B.A.S.I.C. (Brothers and Sisters in Christ).

UNI classes begin at 8 a.m. Monday, Aug. 23.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Gallery of Art will present an exhibit, 'The Insomniac's Mansion: Picture-Stories and Drawings by Ben Katchor,' from Monday, Aug. 23 through Friday, Sept. 17. The gallery doors will open at 9 a.m. The artist will discuss his work in a lecture, 'Readings from the Beauty Supply District' on Tuesday, Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. in the Kamerick Art Building Art Auditorium. An artist's reception will follow.

Ben Katchor, a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius' award winner, is a cartoonist and author of The Jew of New York and Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories. Katchor's Julius Knipl comic strips are regularly featured in the New Yorker, Metropolis Magazine, San Francisco Weekly, and Washington D.C. City Paper. From 1995 to 1996, Katchor was a semi-regular featured speaker on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition Saturday with Scott Simon. The Carbon Copy Building, a comic book opera with works and sets by Katchor, won an Obie Award in 1999. Katchor is working on a new music-theatre project in New York.

This exhibition is an expansion of a series of presentations that began with Convention and Invention: An Exhibition of Publication Design and a mini-exhibition of comic books titled An Acid Bath for the Curious Mind, both of which were curated by Phil Fass, UNI professor of art.

The exhibition, lecture and reception are sponsored in part by the Iowa Arts Council, the Martha Ellen Tye Visiting Artist/Scholar Series, and the Florence Hartwig Endowment.

All events at the UNI Gallery of Art are free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Mon. through Thurs.; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fri.; and noon to 5 p.m., Sat. and Sun. The gallery is located at the northeast corner of Hudson Road and West 27th Street, on the main floor of the Kamerick Art Building. For more information, call (319) 273-3095 or visit http://www.uni.edu/artdept/gallery/

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August 9, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Beginning this month, the University of Northern Iowa will send letters to qualified Iowa high school seniors, inviting them to enroll in the university's Honors Program for fall 2005. Qualified students are those admitted to UNI with an ACT composite of 27 or better, and ranking in the top 10 percent of their high school class.

Honors students will be enrolled until the program reaches capacity. According to Jessica Moon, director of the program, the program gives outstanding students the chance to grow in an environment tailored for academic standouts.

'The Honors Program, which began in 2001, is a way for motivated and interested students to have challenging classroom experiences, social connections with fellow students, and close ties with faculty. The program encourages intellectual curiosity and individual initiative,' said Moon.

The program also will award 50 scholarships to incoming students. Twenty students will receive the Presidential Scholarship worth $28,000 over four years ($7,000 per year). Thirty students will be awarded Provost Scholarships worth $8,000 over four years ($2,000 per year). Application criteria include an ACT composite of 29 or better, and top 10 percent rank (or one of the top five students in a class of 50 or fewer). Applicants should have strong academic credentials, and personal involvement in leadership and service activities. Applicants must submit UNI's Online Common Scholarship Application and an essay. The deadline to apply is Dec. 15.

For more information, contact Moon, (319) 273-3175, or visit www.uni.edu/honors/.

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August 8, 2004 - 7:00pm

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The Iowa Waste Reduction Center at UNI will demonstrate special painting equipment and techniques at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 10, at Camp Dodge. At the demonstration, Camp Dodge painters will paint tactical vehicles in preparation for deployment. The demonstration was previously scheduled for 10 a.m.

The IWRC has developed a program whose primary purpose is to identify the concerns of the military refinishing industry and practice strategies and techniques that will enable them to use less material and improve finish quality. It also is designed to reduce costs and lessen environmental impact. Rick Klein, senior research technician for the IWRC, said the coating is a critical factor for servicemen's safety. 'Properly applied coatings may not only provide camouflage, but also signal reduction from infrared detection.'

August 4, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa offers the expertise of its faculty and staff to Iowa's communities. The UNI Speakers Bureau offers more than 175 presentations. Topics include professional development, family, breast cancer, business communication, cross cultural studies, hazardous waste management, public speaking, creativity, and much more.

Businesses and community organizations interested in scheduling a speaker can contact the Office Of University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728 or visit www.uni.edu/pubrel/speakers.

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August 3, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will host an exhibit, focusing on rural education, during the state fair in Des Moines, Thursday, Aug. 12 through Sunday, Aug. 22. Titled 'Excellence in Education,' the exhibit will be in the Varied Industries Building.

Featured will be a 1920s-style one-room school, including teacher's desk, student desks, period stove, bell, books, slates, lunch pails and other memorabilia. For the exhibit, the university staff located and interviewed Iowa educators from each decade since 1920. The written profiles are on display within the exhibit.

Staff from the UNI Museums will be dressed in period costume Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 18 and 19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free panther paw tattoos will be available each day of the exhibit.

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August 2, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– Purple and Gold Community Life Scholarships have been awarded to 14 transfer students who will begin their studies this fall at the University of Northern Iowa.

___(Name)___ of ___(Hometown)__, will receive a Purple and Gold Scholarship.

To be considered, students must be non-resident incoming transfer students. The scholarship is renewable for a second year providing the student maintains full-time and non-residency status and a G.P.A. of 2.5 or above.

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Purple & Gold Comm Life 0704 sp: H

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NOTE TO EDITORS: Listed below in alphabetical order, by State and hometown, are the names of the recipients of the Purple and Gold Community Life Scholarship. Please check for students in your coverage area.

HOMETOWN STUDENT NAME

GEORGIA

NORCROSS Taryn Lightbourner

ILLINOIS

COAL VALLEY Jason Shelangouski

EAST DUBUQUE Amy Kennicker

EAST MOLINE Amanda Evans

SHERRARD Ryan Devriendt

WOODSTOCK Brian Smiley



KANSAS

WICHITA Gretchen Moore

MINNESOTA

ANOKA Andrew Kocisak

AUSTIN Sara Turvey

EDEN PRAIRIE Jennifer Hammes

NEW PRAGUE Krystal Pomije

NORTH DAKOTA

GLEN ULLIN Sarah Morman

WAHPETON Latisha Porter

NEBRASKA

OMAHA Megan Nielsen



-END-

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Smart Start II: Small Business Financials and IRS Tax Requirements,' an entrepreneurial training course, will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC) from 4 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 10, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth. St, Waterloo.

Instructing the class will be accountant Kathy Frey. This course will provide an understanding of basic financial statements such as profit and loss statements, balance sheets and cash flows as a method to gauge the performance and success of your business. Bank reconciliations, bookkeeping systems, accounts receivable, accounts payable and tax requirements for small businesses in Iowa, will also be discussed.



Cost is $25 per person. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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July 29, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Three North Linn High School graduates attending the University of Northern Iowa, have been awarded the Michael D. Krob Memorial Scholarship, usually given to incoming freshmen from North Linn High School in Troy Mills.

This year, however, there were no incoming freshman from North Linn High School UNI. So the award was given to current UNI students. Recipients are senior marketing major Heather Miller of Coggon, senior business management major Kerry Reilly of Coggon, and senior accounting and finance major Jessica Sackett of Walker. Each received a $1,000 scholarship for the 2004-2005 academic year.

The Michael D. Krob Scholarship is awarded annually, with preference given to business majors and those with demonstrated financial need. Recipients must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0. Contact Julie Raak at North Linn High School or the UNI Financial Aid Office for more information.

The award was established by Robert M. and Penny Krob through the UNI Foundation in memory of their son, Michael D. Krob. He was a 1995 graduate of the College of Business, with a degree in businesss management. After graduation, Krob started his career working at the family business, F.J. Krob & Co. In April 1999, he was killed while working.

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July 27, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– Purple and Gold Scholarships have been awarded to 14 transfer students who will begin their studies this fall at the University of Northern Iowa.

___(Name)___ of ___(Hometown)__, will receive a Purple and Gold Scholarship.

To be considered, students must be non-resident incoming transfer students. The scholarship is renewable for a second year providing the student maintains full-time and non-residency status and a G.P.A. of 2.5 or above.

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HOMETOWN STUDENT NAME

GEORGIA

NORCROSS Taryn Lightbourner

ILLINOIS

COAL VALLEY Jason Shelangouski

EAST DUBUQUE Amy Kennicker

EAST MOLINE Amanda Evans

SHERRARD Ryan Devriendt

WOODSTOCK Brian Smiley



KANSAS

WICHITA Gretchen Moore

MINNESOTA

ANOKA Andrew Kocisak

AUSTIN Sara Turvey

EDEN PRAIRIE Jennifer Hammes

NEW PRAGUE Krystal Pomije

NORTH DAKOTA

GLEN ULLIN Sarah Morman

WAHPETON Latisha Porter

NEBRASKA

OMAHA Megan Nielsen



July 25, 2004 - 7:00pm

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet at the Sioux City Convention Center, Tuesday and Wednesday, August 3 and 4. Specific times for discussion of most items are unknown. The docket is available on the Web at http://www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html

1. Annual distance education report

UNI offers a variety of high-quality off-campus opportunities. Consistent with its mission as a teacher-preparation university, much of UNI's distance education activity historically has been in providing graduate credit opportunities for teachers who wish to enhance their skills, earn college credit for recertification, add a new endorsement or earn a graduate degree.

- The number of UNI distance-education courses and enrollments increases ever year

- In 2003-04 UNI provided 609 credit courses and programs with 9,528 student enrollments

- Students from 69 Iowa counties were served in 2003-04

Contact:

Aaron Podolefsky, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs, (319) 273-2517

2. Synopsis of fiscal year 2006 priority budget issues

Contact:

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

3. Annual student financial aid narrative report

UNI's financial aid awarding philosophy is based on the recruitment goals and objectives of the UNI strategic plan. We offer both need-based and merit-based aid. Due to the availability of funding, financial aid is awarded to students on a first-come, first-served basis. All financial aid awarded cannot, in combination, exceed the individual cost of attending UNI.

The focus of the UNI Financial Aid Office this year has been to improve and streamline services for students. Highlights include:

a. The new Student Services Center, which integrates key student services in Gilchrist Hall

b. A common online undergraduate scholarship application

c. The new online computer tool, 'Calculate My Aid'

d. The Tuition Opportunity Program for Iowans (TOP) -- a new recruitment program for needy Iowa freshmen.

e. A disaster relief grant for flood and tornado victims.

f. New scholarships targeted at out-of-state recruitment.

Contact:

Renee Romano, vice president for Educational & Student Services, (319) 273-2331

Roland Carrillo, executive director, Enrollment Management, (319) 273-2701



4. Capital register

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

5. Institutional roads

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

6. Naming the new arena

Formal request for approval to name the new arena the 'McLeod Center.'

Contact:

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

Bill Calhoun, vice president for University Advancement, (319) 273-2487

7. Institutional personnel transactions for June 2004

Contact:

Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2256

Nick Bambach, director, Human Resource Services, (319) 273-2423

8. Annual internal audit plan

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for Administration & Finance, (319) 273-2382

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Contact:

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-6728



July 22, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A group of research scientists-in-the-making will present the results of their summer research projects in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and earth science at a special meeting on the University of Northern Iowa campus at 11 a.m. Friday, July 30.

At the third annual College of Natural Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research Poster Session, about 45 UNI students will display posters describing their work and be available to discuss their research from noon to 1:30 p.m., in the Seerley Hall Great Reading Room (Room 116).

'For students, summer research is an experience that coalesces what they have learned in individual courses into a coherent picture,' said Jill Trainer, professor of biology and interim associate dean of the College of Natural Sciences. She is coordinating the CNS summer undergraduate research program. 'And faculty have an opportunity to work with some of the brightest students on campus.'

Opening the meeting at 11 a.m., in Seerley 115, will be the keynote presentation, 'Changes in Hyaluronic Acid Composition in Human Skin: The Effect of Aging' by Maria O. Longas of the Department of Physics and Chemistry at Purdue University. Hyaluronic acid is a viscous fluid that occurs, among other places in the human body, as a cementing substance in tissue under the skin.

Five of the students reporting their findings at the session are part of the Merck/American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Undergraduate Science Research Program, which promotes interdisciplinary research experience among undergraduates.

UNI is one of 15 U.S. colleges and universities that received an award from Merck/AAAS. The program is funded by the Merck Company Foundation, a private charitable foundation established by pharmaceutical manufacturer Merck & Co., and administered by the AAAS, the world's largest federation of scientific and engineering societies.

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July 21, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Due to overwhelming demand, the UNI-Dome has opened an additional 960 floor seats for the upcoming concert by country music star Kenny Chesney.

Chesney, winner of the 2003 Country Music Television (CMT) Video of the Year award, will be in concert at 8 p.m., Friday, Aug. 6, at the UNI-Dome.

'Ticket sales have exceeded our expectations,' said Heather Tousignant, UNI-Dome director of operations/athletic facilities. 'We're opening more seats to meet the demand. This is going to be a great concert.' Chesney's latest album 'When the Sun Goes Down,' has spawned a No. 1 single, 'There Goes My Life.' This record follows up his 2000 platinum, 'Kenny Chesney's Greatest Hits' CD, which featured 13 of his previous top 10 singles, six of which reached No. 1. He sold more than 1.3 million tickets on last year's 'Margarita and Senorita Tour.' 'Young,' the CMT Video of the Year, was also nominated for three CMA awards and four Academy of Country Music awards.

Opening for Chesney will be Lava recording artist, Uncle Kracker, who blends down-home soul, hip-hop and hard driving rock 'n roll. Kracker is back with the follow up to 2000's critically acclaimed, Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) double-platinum 'Double Wide' and the crossover pop smash, 'Follow Me.'

Tickets for the 'Guitars, Tiki Bars and A Whole Lotta Love' are $47.50 and $34.50 plus applicable service charges and facility fees. They are available at the UNI-Dome (NW) Ticket Office, all Ticketmaster centers or may be charged by phone at (319) 363-1888 or online at www.ticketmaster.com.

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July 20, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Northern University High School senior Tim McKenna of Cedar Falls was named to the Starter All-American Teen program's honor roll for 2004. McKenna was the top runner-up for the state of Iowa.

The Starter All-American Teen program presented by Starter and 'Sports Illustrated' recognizes outstanding teens in each state based on their performance and activities between July 2003 and July 2004. Honorees must be between 13 and 19 years of age, participate in organized athletics and be an exemplary role model for their peers and community. A panel of celebrity judges including NBC broadcaster Bob Costas; world-record holder and Olympic medalist Jackie Joyner Kersee; critically acclaimed director and producer Spike Lee; Pro Football Hall-of-Fame inductee and studio analyst for Fox NFL Sunday Howie Long; and Miami Heat all-star center Shaquille O'Neal, selected an All-American for each state.

McKenna has been a starter on the NU High soccer team for three years and NU High basketball team for two. He was named to the All-Metro soccer team in 2004. But, cross-country, which McKenna took up to get in shape for other sports, has developed into his greatest strength. He won the North Iowa Cedar League Conference race three years in a row and finished second in the state in 2003. McKenna also took first place in the 2004 class 1-A 3,200 meters.

Last fall, McKenna spent the final two periods of every day assisting in an art/architecture class, helping design and erect display cases, cleaning up the room and helping students. He was the vice president of his junior class, a member of the National Honor Society, and volunteers at the local humane society and in the children's section of the Cedar Falls Public Library. He also maintains a 3.93 G.P.A.

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July 19, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa senior religion major Michelle Nielsen of Eldridge was selected as an undergraduate fellow by the Fund for Theological Education (FTE) in Atlanta. Nielsen was awarded $1,500 for the academic year, $500 for a mentoring stipend, and travel expenses to a conference at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif., this summer.

Nielsen was one of 70 recipients, all of whom are juniors or seniors considering ministry as a career. Recipients must maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or above and possess exceptional gifts for ministry.

Betty DeBerg, professor and head of UNI's philosophy and religion department said, 'The FTE undergraduate program gives promising college students an introduction to ministry and content of theological education before they make a firm vocational commitment.'

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July 18, 2004 - 7:00pm

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1. UNI faculty member working with U.S. Olympic teams at 2004 Athens Olympic Games

Geof Mills, former associate dean of UNI's College of Business Administration, is on leave from UNI serving as provost of the American College of Greece, the exclusive training site for U.S. Olympic teams. Mills is directly involved with the Olympics, dealing with security issues. He regularly works with the U.S. Embassy on Olympics-related matters. He also is a volunteer for NBC.

Contact:

Geof Mills -- mills@acgmail.gr

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2. Recent UNI graduate working as intern for U.S. Olympic Committee

Rebecca Kruse, a May 2004 UNI graduate from Cresco, has begun a six-month Internship with the U.S. Olympic Committee's (USOC) Media and Public Relations Division. She is actively involved in the day-to-day operations of the division, including preparation of the Week in Review, which highlights U.S. Olympic sporting news from around the world. She also interviews athletes and writes articles for the Olympic Beat and other USOC news sources, and helps maintain the USOC Athlete and Team of the Month awards program. Additionally, Kruse will assist with projects in support of Team USA during and after the 2004 Olympic and Paralympic games.

Contact:

Rebecca Kruse -- kruse@usoc.org

USOC Media and Public Relations Division, (719) 866-4529.

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3. UNI professor to work as photojournalist at 2004 Athens Paralympic Games

The Paralympics, taking place after the Olympics in the same venues as the Olympics. are designed for world-class athletes who are physically disabled. Susan Hudson, McElroy Professor of Youth Studies at UNI, will attend the Paralympics as a photojournalist for 'Challenge Publications,' an international journal for disabled sports. She is credentialed through the U.S. Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee.

'Although the Paralympics do not get the same publicity as the Olympics, the achievements of the athletes are just as remarkable, if not more so, because of the obstacles the athletes have to overcome,' said Hudson.

Contact:

Susan Hudson, (319) 273-2790, susan.hudson@uni.edu

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4. UNI offered summer study tour in Greece

UNI offered a course, 'Greece and Its Heritages: A Study Tour of Greece,' in Greece this summer. Instructors were Gregory Bruess, associate professor of history; and Isabela Varela, career information specialist in UNI's Career Center. For more than 20 years, Bruess has traveled extensively in Greece, studying and conducting research there. Varela, a certified Greek tour guide, is an expert on Greek archeological sites and ancient Greek art and culture.

Seventeen students from Iowa and Texas participated in the course, ancient Olympia and the Olympic stadium built for the 1896 games. Varela will return to Iowa prior to the start of the Olympic Games. The exact date is not known. Bruess will be back in his office Aug. 9.

Contact:

Isabela Varela, career information specialist, (319) 983-2106, isabela.varela@uni.edu

Gregory Bruess, associate professor of history, (319) 273-2752, bruess@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Student Health Clinic has received accreditation by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC).

Status as an accredited organization means that the Student Health Clinic has passed a series of rigorous and nationally recognized standards. More than 1,300 ambulatory health care organizations across the United States are accredited by the AAAHC.

'Accreditation underscores our long-standing commitment to providing the highest possible levels of quality care to the community we serve,' said Sue Courts, health clinic director.

The UNI health center, open to students since 1962, offers a variety of services, including insurance, general medicine, pharmacy, mental health counseling, and women's services. The center has relocated for renovations. Students can receive services in Dancer Hall during construction. Plans call for the existing building to be gutted for reconstruction and a two-story addition to be attached to the east side. There will be a retail pharmacy, and the Counseling Center and Office of Disability Services will join the clinic and campus pharmacy in the building. UNI plans to open the remodeled center in fall 2005.

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July 15, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Michael Hager has been named director of residence at the University of Northern Iowa. Hager served three years as a resident assistant in UNI's residence hall system, and was student body president for 1985-86.

Most recently, he served as associate director of housing administration and information systems at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He succeeds Robert Hartman who retired June 30, following 27 years with UNI's residence system, the last 10 as director.

Following his graduation from UNI, Hager joined the staff at Loras College in Dubuque as residence hall director and off-campus housing coordinator, and then assistant director of student life. He joined the residence staff at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as assistant director of housing administration in 1993, and was named associate director of housing administration and information systems there in 1999.

At UNL, he was involved in facilities expansion, marketing programs and retention in the residence system, directing summer conference operations, and coordinating information technology for university housing. He originated and developed the latter area for the residence system.

Hager, who began his duties at UNI July 6, moved to Cedar Falls earlier this month with his wife and family.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Eight incoming transfer students at the University of Northern Iowa were awarded the Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship.

Recipients were Tyler Schaefer of Aurelia, Tyler Rice of Cedar Falls, Molly Duitsman of Estherville, David Crimmins of Fort Dodge, Ashley Allen of Independence, Richard Dedor of Mason City, Keith Olson of McCallsburg, Wade Cornick of Mount Pleasant and Jolynn Christensen of Riceville. Each will receive a $1,000 scholarship renewable for a second year.

The award is given to incoming transfer students who are members of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society at the community college from which they are transferring. Applicants must demonstrate leadership, campus and/or community involvement. A GPA of 3.5 or above is required. Students must maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. in order for the scholarship to be renewed.

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July 13, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– The Sturgis Youth Theatre will present 'Treasure Island: The Adventures of Jim Hawkins' at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 22 through Saturday, July 24, in the Strayer-Wood Theatre, on the UNI campus.

The classic pirate adventure, written by Robert Louis Stevenson and adapted for the stage by James DeVita, will be performed by more than 40 children from the Cedar Valley, in such roles as Long John Silver, Billy Bones and Black Dog. The play is under the direction of Gretta Berghammer, professor of theater at UNI. Stage manager will be Nick Halder of Cherokee, a UNI senior theater major, with assistance from UNI senior theater major Dana Baranowski of LaPorte City. Sam Steirt, a student at Peet Junior High School, is serving as assistant to Berghammer. Production designers include scenic designer Mark A. Parrott, a staff designer for Theatre UNI; costume designer Carmelita Guse, a UNI graduate; lighting designer Eric Lange, faculty designer and head of the UNI theater department; and hair and makeup designer Andrea Goergen, a UNI theater major. Kristen Solner, Jason Senchina, Caitlin Hurban and Caitlin Moody are providing additional technical support in the areas of props and scenery construction.

Cast members listed in alphabetical order by last name include: Carter Allen, Ally Bachman, Alexandra Bowman, Bailey Carlisle, Curtis Carney, Cheyenne Carter, Cassie and Eric Crotty, Alexa Deines, Maggie Devine, Allison Dreyer, Heather Edeker, Karen Engels, Ann Fienup, Kaylee Frost, Nathan Gomez, Leandra Gute, Emily Highnam, Jessie Hoffman, Nadia Honary, Elena and Luke Houseal.

Also, Hannah Howland, Emily and Jennifer Hurban, Emily and Eric Jahnke, Jessica Jenkins, Kendal Klobassa, Dylan and Riley Martin, Nicholas Menefee, Benjamin Merz, Tessa Michaelsen, Thea Moe, Matthew Moody, Alicia Palas, Alicia Pierce, Sara Rose, Sara Roth, Emma Scott, Sam Steiert, Ana and Ellie Tallakson, James Vannordstrand and Matthew Vichlach.

Tickets for 'Treasure Island' are $5 and may be purchased by calling the Strayer-Wood Theatre Box Office at (319)-273-6381. Tickets will be available online at www.uni.edu/tickets.

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July 11, 2004 - 7:00pm

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In the '80s, the 'garbage crisis' -- pollution, shrinking landfills, and poor air quality -- spurred millions of citizens to begin sorting trash, recycling what they could and doing their part to save the environment. Since the mid-'90s though, the amount of recycled material has declined sharply. 'What recycling peaks showed was that the consumer was willing to protect the environment,' said Sue Schauls, with the Iowa Waste Reduction Center at UNI. 'What also happened is that it eased the guilt of buying individually packaged goods.'

Schauls said the decline can be attributed to several factors. First, more items are convenience packaged today, creating more containers to be recycled. Second, the market for recycled materials was never fully developed so there are no outlets for recycled material. 'In many cases curbside recycling creates more waste and pollution from the collection by the gas-/diesel-guzzling truck than it is worth (which is sometimes nothing). The final blow is when consumers/recyclers realize that lots of recycled materials end up in the landfill anyway -- although in a more compact form.'

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July 8, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Registrations are being accepted for the Little Panther Shootout, a three-on-three basketball tournament sponsored by Northern University High School on Saturday, Aug. 7, at the University of Northern Iowa's Wellness Recreation Center.

Entry forms are available online at www.pls.uni.edu/3on3 or www.kwwl.com. They also are available by writing to Little Panther Shootout, P.O. Box 1259, Cedar Falls, 50613. The entry fee is $85.

Divisions for males and females include fourth-12th grade, 30 years and under, over 30, and open. Those who have played in college or are semi-pro players must enter the open division. All teams are guaranteed at least three games. Trophies will be awarded to winning teams.

During the event, Bill Allen, also known as the Shot Doctor, will provide free basketball clinics for individuals or small groups. Allen recently retired after 30 years of coaching and teaching in Oelwein, and has instructed more than 900 athletes through his various clinics.

For more information, contact Larry or Judy Timmins, (319) 277-3297.

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CEDAR FALLS�Sixteen students at the University of Northern Iowa have spent a portion of their summer welcoming entering freshmen, transfer students and their parents to UNI's Summer Orientation.



__(Name)__ of __(Hometown)__ is serving on the orientation staff. (See information on individual students below.)

Guidelines for staff selection were interpersonal strengths, involvement in campus activities and organizations, academic achievement, knowledge of the university and sensitivity to the concerns of new students and their parents.

Jon Buse, program director, and Connie Hansen, assistant director, said approximately 1,800 freshmen and 400 transfer students attended orientation this summer. The two-day summer orientation sessions for incoming freshmen were held twice a week from June 7 through July 9, while one-day sessions were held for transfer students.

During the sessions, students and parents attended presentations addressing different aspects of college life. Students participated in various activities with summer orientation staff to learn how to make the most of their college experience. They also met with their academic advisers, registered for fall semester classes and explored campus.

Parents learned about residence hall living, financial aid, academic advising and class scheduling, and had an opportunity to visit with UNI faculty and tour the campus.

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HOMETOWN STUDENT AND BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

ANKENY Tara Tyler, a senior elementary and middle level education major, is a member of the Student Alumni Ambassadors and several pre-professional organizations and honor societies. She has been a resident assistant in Rider Hall and president of Lawther Hall. She also worked as a national communications coordinator for MACURH (Midwest Affiliation of College and University Residence Halls).



BOONE Ryan Stone, a senior elementary and middle level education major, is actively involved in campus life. He has served in house government and has been a desk assistant in Campbell Hall for the past three years. He holds leadership positions as vice president of both the Student Association of Middle Level Educators (SAMLE) and the UNI chapter of the National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHN). In addition, Stone has participated on the homecoming committee and in the marching and pep bands. This is his second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

BURLINGTON Luke Wagner, a senior elementary and middle level education major, is a transfer student. He is a member of the Student Alumni Ambassadors, Omicron Delta Kappa, Student Association of Middle Level Educators (SAMLE), and the Gallagher-Bluedorn Student Interaction Committee. He is active in his residence hall, where he served as house treasurer, and was an officer in a co-ed leadership fraternity. He is preparing for a trip abroad to Australia.

CARROLL Jennifer Langel, a senior finance major, decided on UNI after watching her two older sisters graduate from the university. She has worked in the Office of Admissions for three years, served on the Campbell Hall Senate for two years as president of Tree House and participated in numerous committees throughout her residence life.

CASCADE Joe Dobler, a senior elementary and middle level education major, has served in leadership roles while living in the residence halls. He was the social chair for Grimes House and also served as president of Rider Hall. An avid Panther fan, he also participates in basketball and intramural sports at UNI's Wellness and Recreation Center.

CENTER POINT Brian Hanneman is a senior industrial technology education major. As a ResNet computer consultant for his residence hall, Brian is the person residents seek out to solve problems with their computers. When not working, he is involved with the Navigators Campus Ministry, house activities, intramural sports or enjoying the Wellness and Recreation Center.

DAVENPORT Jen Burton is a senior math education major who has been active in a variety of organizations at UNI. She was a member of the UNI Volleyball Club for two years and has participated in Camp Adventure. A student supervisor at the 23rd Street Market, she also coaches a volleyball team and is a member of the Student Alumni Ambassadors.

DEWITT Briget Froeschle is a senior public relations major who is active in both PRIDE and PRSSA, two pre-professional public relations student organizations on campus. She also is a member of the Student Alumni Ambassadors and St. Stephens Catholic Student Center, and enjoys participating in outdoor activities.

MANCHESTER Paul Waterman is a senior elementary education major who has demonstrated leadership through involvement in an array of activities at UNI. He has served as a house and hall secretary and as a peer adviser in his residence hall. He is co-president of the Lutheran Student Center and a member of Student Alumni Ambassadors, as well as the Co-Curricular Transcript Committee. He has worked in the Redeker Dining Center and Academic Advising Services, and is a resident assistant in Campbell Hall. This is Paul's second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.



MILFORD Brock Holman is a senior elementary and middle school education major. He has been involved in a variety of campus activities, including leadership positions in the residence halls, where he has been house president, community service chair, MACURH (Midwest Affiliation of College and University Residence Halls) Conference Planning Committee member, resident assistant and community adviser. In addition, he is a member of the National Residence Hall Honorary and enjoys volunteering for both the Waterloo Community Schools and the Oster Regent Theater. This is his second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

REASNOR Julie Lust, a senior leisure services major, has been involved in many campus organizations, including InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, the Homecoming Committee, Student Life Team and the Women's Studies Program. She also has worked as a resident assistant and organized the 2004 V-Day, a weeklong event dedicated to raising awareness and ending violence against women. This is her second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

SIOUX CITY Melanie Miller, a senior chemistry and marketing major, has been involved in numerous activities while at UNI. She is a Student Alumni Ambassador and is enrolled in the University Honors Program. She has worked as a peer adviser in Academic Advising Services, as a resident assistant in Lawther Hall and as a secretary for an insurance adjuster. She has held many leadership positions in Gamma Phi Beta Sorority and is treasurer of the Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society. She is preparing for a semester of study in Australia. This is her second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

STOCKTON Megan Hass is a senior elementary education major who is a community adviser in the ROTH Complex and has been a resident assistant in Rider Hall. In addition, she is a member of the Student Alumni Ambassadors and Kappa Delta Pi, an education honor society. This is her second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

OUT-OF-STATE

ATLANTA, GA. Dionne Burks, a senior electronic media major, has had a penchant for starting new student organizations during her college career. She is the founder of the Monopoly Club and Academic Study of Religion Club. She works as the student accounts clerk in the Student Involvement and Activities Center and is a member of Panther Productions and the Student Life Team. She also sings with her church choir, performs karaoke and creates music videos. This is her second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

OUT-OF-COUNTRY

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA Federico Nicol�s Moreno V�cari, is a senior economics and Russian language major who enjoys helping students achieve their social and academic goals. He has worked as a resident assistant for two years and is involved in a variety of organizations relating to the martial arts, economics and the study of language and culture. He will be visiting Russia later this year in order to study his sixth language. This is his second year as a Summer Orientation Staff member.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL Ashim Lamichhane, a senior computer science major, says he has found a home away from home at UNI. The director of International Student Affairs for the Northern Iowa Student Government and vice president of the International Student Association, he also is involved in the UNI Computer Club and works at the UNI bakery and the Financial Aid Office.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The family services major within the University of Northern Iowa's Department of Design, Family and Consumer Sciences (DFCS), has been approved by the National Council on Family Relations, as a provider of a curriculum leading to national certification as a family life educator.

According to Howard Barnes, head of DFCS, the council's Certified Family Life Educator Academic Program Review Committee gave the approval. 'This means that, if our majors take the specified courses, they will be able to use an abbreviated and expedited application process to become certified family life educators,' he explained.

Certification recognizes a proven background and understanding in specific family life areas: families in society, internal dynamics of families, life-span human growth and development, human sexuality, interpersonal relationships, family resource management, parent education and guidance, family law and public policy, ethics, and family life education methodology. Careers available for those graduating with this major include case managers for agencies and organizations, health educators, guidance counselors, volunteer coordinators, and community relations liaisons.

The National Council on Family Relations provides a forum for family researchers, educators, and practitioners to share in the development and dissemination of knowledge about families and family relationships. The organization also establishes professional standards, and promotes family well-being.

For more information about the major, contact Barnes at (319) 273-2358, or Michael Fleming, associate professor in the department, at (319) 273-6301.

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July 5, 2004 - 7:00pm

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Iowans have resigned to smacking, spraying and scratching their way through this mosquito-laden summer. But David Mercer doesn't want them pointing accusing fingers at wetlands, or wetland restoration for increased production of mosquitoes. Wetland restoration has become an increasingly important environmental issue to replace natural wetlands lost to agriculture or construction, and to restore habitats. They naturally have a high level of production; are very good at capturing sediment in a stream, thereby purifying water; and take carbon dioxide out of the air.

'Lots of people think that one of the down sides to wetlands is that they produce lots of mosquitoes. Sometimes it's true. But in my experience, a complete well-functioning wetland does not produce many mosquitoes. That's a critical question as we worry about West Nile and other mosquito-borne diseases.'

Mercer points out that, in Iowa alone, there are 50 different mosquito species. Some bite humans, some don't. Some are good vectors of diseases. Others are not. 'A mosquito is not a mosquito is not a mosquito. The ones most commonly involved in disease transmission come out of polluted water, which is more likely to be associated with human activity, not natural activity. We're crying wolf when we should be paying better attention to what we're doing than what nature is doing.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Scholarships have been awarded to 18 minority students who will begin their studies this fall at the University of Northern Iowa, as freshmen or transfer students.

___(Name)___ of ___(Address/Hometown)___, will receive a ___(scholarship name)___ scholarship. He/She is a __(freshman/transfer)__.

Multicultural Achievement and Talent Scholarships are based on a formula using several criteria, including rank in class, ACT, GPA and financial need. They range in value from $200 to $1,500, and are renewable for three years with a 2.75 GPA or above.

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For a complete list of scholarship winners, contact the office of University Marketing & Public Relations at 319-273-6728.

June 29, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A new project at the University of Northern Iowa will help families demystify financial aid awards, and make crucial financial decisions earlier than ever before.

Called 'Calculate My Aid,' this new online tool is available to help families get a realistic picture of financial aid options for students attending UNI.

'Financial aid packages have always been somewhat of a mystery to families until they actually get their financial aid award,' said Roland Carrillo, executive director of enrollment management at UNI. He explained the federal financial aid process does not allow families to apply for financial aid before January of the year their student will begin college. Awards are made that spring.

'Now, the family can have an idea of the aid available to them months in advance of attending UNI. This gives the family much more time to think about all the options available and budget accordingly.'

To access the tool, visit the UNI Office of Financial Aid Web site, www.uni.edu/finaid, and click on 'Calculate My Aid.' Carrillo said users follow a two-step process. 'First we help you determine your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). Just type in the financial information requested -- basic tax, income and family information -- and the system will determine your approximate EFC. Step two is to view your estimated financial aid by indicating your grade level, EFC and residency. Click on 'submit' and your estimate appears.'

Carrillo cautioned that 'Calculate My Aid' does not replace the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which must be completed every year the student plans to attend college. The new tool also does not include scholarships that require competition.

'Calculate My Aid' is the latest tool developed by the university to help students and families see that a UNI education can be both affordable and a good investment.

'We know that education is one key to ending the cycle of poverty, and increasing quality of life statewide,' said Carrillo. 'To that end, UNI is committed to helping more students find more ways to attend college.'

For more information on this or other financial aid programs at the university, contact the Office of Financial Aid, (319) 273-2700.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- After 15 years as dean of the Graduate College at the University of Northern Iowa, John Somervill is returning to teaching in the university's Department of Psychology. Somervill has served as the graduate dean since July 1, 1989, and was acting dean of the college for one year prior to that time. He joined the UNI psychology faculty in 1975.

Aaron Podolefsky, UNI provost & vice president for Academic Affairs, noted that UNI's graduate programs have enjoyed increased enrollments and diversity under Somervil's leadership. 'I have been especially grateful for the continuous and close personal attention he has given to leading our graduate minority recruitment and retention efforts.'

Somervill will continue to provide assistance to the university in meeting its diversity goals.

Associate Provost Susan Koch will take on responsibility as interim dean of the Graduate College. Kichoon Yang, dean of the College of Natural Sciences, will assume guidance of Sponsored Programs, Grants and Contracts, the Institutional Review Board and related offices.

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June 28, 2004 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- William Callahan, associate dean for undergraduate education and director of Malcolm Price Laboratory School (MPLS) at the University of Northern Iowa, announced the finalization of the administrative structure for the MPLS 2004-2005 school year.

Dave Smith will be associate director and principal of grades 9-12. Curt Nielsen will be assistant principal in charge of coordinating research and data analysis, and J.D. Cryer will be principal for students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Amy Lockhart will be the upper-elementary teacher leader for fourth and fifth grades, and sixth-grade transition coordinator. For early childhood, Denise Tallakson will be teacher leader. Jill Uhlenberg will continue her role as director of the child development center and coordinator of early childhood research and outreach.

Callahan said Cryer, Nielsen, Tallakson and Lockhart also will have additional teaching responsibilities.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Four incoming freshmen at the University of Northern Iowa were awarded the Rose H. Quick Scholarship. Recipients were Samuel Garles, and Sara Rhum, both of Fairfield, Tina Egli of Lockridge, and Kyle Wilhelm of Montrose.

Each will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

The award is given to incoming freshmen, with preference given to residents of southeastern Iowa and is based on academic ability.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Nine incoming College of Social and Behavioral Sciences freshmen at the University of Northern Iowa have been awarded scholarships. Recipients are: Lia Plakke of Cedar Falls, Teaya Minks of Waterloo, Melissa Heffernen of Altoona, Michelle Vanderah of Ankeny, Diane Meyer of Harris, Amy Higgins of La Porte City, Jessica Young of Nevada, Dustin Behrens of Sioux City and Ryan Puhrmann of Waverly.

Each will receive a $5,000 scholarship. To be considered for the award, students must be Iowa residents entering the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences who are in the top 15 percent of their graduating class and received an ACT score of 27 or above.

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June 27, 2004 - 7:00pm

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As a dietitian, Lisa Krausman has seen all the diet fads: low-fat, low-carb, Phen-Fen, grapefruit, South Beach, The Zone. 'There is a lot of pressure placed on people -- primarily women -- to be thin,' she said. 'So we're always looking for a quick way to lose weight.'

She doesn't believe that a fad diet -- or any diet -- is the proper way to lose weight. What Americans should be doing is seeking a healthier lifestyle altogether, and that means eating good-for-you foods like whole-grains, fresh fruits and vegetables; and increasing physical activity. Krausman also suggests limiting the amount of meat consumed. 'It's recommended that the average person get 5 to 6 ounces of meat a day. When you realize that 3 ounces of meat is about the same size as a deck of cards, you can see that you might be eating too much.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Seven University of Northern Iowa students, along with faculty adviser Recayi Pecen, received three trophies and a ninth-place finish at the 2004 World Championship Solar Electric Boat Regatta in Buffalo, N.Y., on June 15.

Six UNI seniors, Jamie Ruth and Eric Schumacher, both of Cedar Falls; Matt Brustkern, Dan Frisch and Phil Tentinger of Waterloo; and Jack Steuben of Jesup; along with sophomore Cullen Hall, of Peosta competed in the 11th annual event with 24 other teams from the United States and Canada.

The team won three trophies for its efforts: fastest boat in qualifying, most commercially viable hull, and most improved team from 2003. Last year the team finished 17th overall. The team was judged on workmanship, overall design, technical papers, practicality and project display. On the water the team competed in three events: a slalom course, an endurance race and a 300-meter sprint.

This year the team made major modifications to the boats drive system, installed a computer- controlled motor, and 144 new photo voltaic (PV) solar cells, reducing the boat's weight by 60 pounds. The UNI Solar Electric Boat project promotes eco-friendly boat technologies in Iowa lakes and rivers and is sponsored by the Iowa Energy Center (IEC), Deere and Co., Farm and Fleet, WBM Marine, and the UNI Office of the Provost.

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June 20, 2004 - 7:00pm

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Recent polls have shown that Americans who attend religious services regularly tend to vote Republican, while those who don't attend church regularly often lean toward the Democratic party. Michael Blackwell, director of multicultural education at UNI and an instructor of classes in both religion and politics, sees it a bit differently. 'I would say that the Republican party has postured itself as the party that has family values, a work ethic, and a religious faith. The whole issue of 'values,' which has become a buzz word for the religious right, is a way to create polarization. It's a divisive tactic that might be an attractive sound bite, but it actually skews where people really are.'

He points out that in some communities -- African Americans, for instance -- there are factors which might further skew the poll results. 'Blacks who consider themselves fairly religious and attend church regularly are probably quite conservative in their values, which may or may not translate into conservative politics. African Americans are pretty progressive politically when they are dealing with issues of racial discrimination and injustice,' he says. 'However, they can be very conservative on issues such as prayer in school, faith-based initiatives, abortion, gay rights, school vouchers, and so forth. Many people generally are surprised when they discover that a large number of blacks hold to principles that can easily be identified with the religious right or conservative Republicans. But it is on the issue of race relations that they tend to veer from the Republican Party and resonate with the more liberally minded Democratic Party.'



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