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News Release Archive

March 4, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Individual Events speech team competed in two tournaments at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater the weekend of February 28 and 29.

At the Edna Sorber Individual Events Tournament, Michelle Kelsey, a senior political communications major from Ankeny, came in first in extemporaneous speaking. Kelsey normally competes with UNI's debate team. This was her first collegiate individual events tournament.

Other place winners were Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English major from Dubuque, placed second in impromptu and extemporaneous; Sara Gronstal, a senior elementary education major from Council Bluffs, came in fourth in prose, fifth in persuasion and sixth in poetry; Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, placed fifth in communication analysis; and Coltrane Carlson, a freshman sports broadcasting major from Council Bluffs, came in sixth in informative. The individual events team finished fourth overall.

At the Mid-American Forensic League Tournament, Hilkin placed first in impromptu; Carlson finished fourth in informative; and Dick came in fourth in prose.

March 3, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's 'Films on Social Justice' series will continue with, 'Speak Up,' at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 11, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108.

According to Chris Schwartz, president of UNI's chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), 'Speak Up' describes issues pertaining to identity, sexuality, family and self-acceptance. The audience will meet a wide range of young people who will share their life experiences on camera.

The video features interviews with Judy Shepard, mother of Matthew Shepard, a gay college student from Montana who was murdered because of his sexual identity; Danny and Julie from the 'Real World: New Orleans;' and musician Anthony Rapp.

UNI's 'Films on Social Justice' series is sponsored by UNI's chapter of Amnesty International; the ACLU; the UNI Students for Social Justice; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Straight, Transgender Association (LGBSTA); the Gender Equality Association (GEA); Iowans for a Free Palestine; the UNI Criminology Club; UNI Student AIDS Campaign; UNI Students Against a Violent Environment (SAVE); and the UNI Sociology & Anthropology Club.

The event is free and open to the public.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's forensics teams were on the road the weekend of February 21 through February 23.

UNI's debate team traveled to Lawrence, Kan., to participate in the University of Kansas Debate Tournament. The individual events speech team visited Wartburg College in Waverly, where it placed third in sweepstakes.

In varsity debate, Eric Short, a senior general communications major from Brookings, S.D., came in eighth individually and ninth with teammate Michelle Kelsey, a senior political communications major from Ankeny.

In novice debate, Amie Steffen, a junior political communications major from Muscatine took first; Kim Adams, a sophomore elementary education major from Des Moines came in second; and Ryan McGeough, a junior philosophy major from Cedar Falls placed third.

In team debate, Steffen and Eric McDonald, a junior psychology major from Cedar Rapids, tied for first, along with teammates Adams and McGeough.

Representing the individual events speech team at Wartburg, Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, placed first in after-dinner speaking and poetry, and second in duo interpretation with senior elementary education major, Sara Gronstal, from Council Bluffs. Dick also placed sixth in impromptu. Gronstal came in second in program oral interpretation, third in dramatic interpretation, and fifth in duo interpretation with Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English major from Dubuque. Hilkin also placed second in extemporaneous, fourth in impromptu and fourth in prose. Coltrane Carlson, a freshman sports broadcasting major from Council Bluffs, came in second in informative and seventh in poetry.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Tres Vidas' ('Three Lives'), a chamber music theater performance, will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, March 11, in the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

In 'Tres Vidas' Georgina Corbo depicts the lives of three legendary Latin-American women: Mexican painter Frida Kahlo; Salvadoran peasant-activist Rufina Amaya; and Argentine poet Alfonsina Storni. The story text was written by Chilean scholar and award-winning writer Marjorie Agosin.

The musical score, performed by the Core Ensemble (cellist Tahirah Whittington, pianist Hugh Hinton and percussionist Michael Parola) includes arrangements of popular and folk music from Latin America, music by tango master Astor Piazzolla and new music by composers from Argentina, Mexico and Cuba.

'Tres Vidas' is sponsored by the UNI Center for Multicultural Education.

Admission is free and open to the public.

March 2, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa student, Sean Murphy of Dubuque, was awarded a $750 scholarship from the Art Directors Association of Iowa.

Murphy, a senior art major, received the scholarship in recognition of his work in graphic design.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI will present the director/designer's presentation for the upcoming performance of 'Ghosts' by Henrik Ibsen, at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 10 in the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

Director Megan Schumacher; scenic designer Leonard Curtis; lighting designer Mark Parrott; and costume designer Jess C. White, will discuss their visions for the production and will share their research, renderings and models used to create the play.

The presentation is free and open to the public.



Theatre UNI will present 11 performances of Ibsen's 'Ghosts,' April 15 through April 25 in the Strayer-Wood Theatre. Tickets are $10 for the general public; $8 for UNI faculty and staff and senior citizens; and $5 for youth.



Tickets for the performance are available at the Strayer-Wood Theatre box office or online at www.theatreuni.com. UNI students may use their Panther Pass activity card to reserve a free ticket.

March 1, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Center for Multicultural Education will present a lecture, 'Race, Class, Sexuality, Gender,' by Jamaican author, Patricia Powell, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 9 at the center.

Powell is the author of three novels, 'Me Dying Trial,' 'A Small Gathering of Bones,' and 'The Pagoda.' Set in Jamaica, her novels explore the impact of the forces of personal and political history on individual racial and sexual identity.

She received the Lila Wallace 'Readers' Digest' Writers Award and in 1993, was a finalist for the Granta/Best of Young Americans Novelist Award. Powell was born in Spanish Town, Jamaica; grew up in Manchester, England, and came to the United States in 1982.

Powell is a Briggs Copeland Lecturer in Creative Writing in the English department at Harvard University.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Amy Unruh has joined the University of Northern Iowa College of Social and Behavioral Sciences as its Iowa Consortium for Applied Gerontology (ICAG) project coordinator.

Unruh holds a B.A. in social work and a certificate of gerontology, the scientific study of aging and its effects, from the University of Northern Iowa. She comes to UNI from Karrington Cottages in Waterloo, where she served as executive director.

As the ICAG project coordinator, Unruh is a part of the recently established Iowa Program for Applied Gerontology at UNI. The program links faculty from UNI with other educators and gerontology service professionals to create interdisciplinary education, research and outreach programs, devoted to enhancing the knowledge base of individuals and organizations serving Iowa's older citizens.

The program will provide educational opportunities to businesses in regard to working with an increasing number of older customers as well as managing their own aging work force.



In addition to business outreach, the ICAG provides gerontology education throughout the state. The program encourages higher education institutions to provide gerontology education, with the goal of increasing the number of students pursuing post-secondary training in this area.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's 'Films on Social Justice' series will continue with, 'Wrestling with Manhood,' at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 9, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108.

According to Chris Schwartz, president of UNI's Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), 'Wrestling with Manhood' draws the connection between professional wrestling and contemporary masculinity. The film's directors, Sut Jhally and Jackson Katz, show how this form of entertainment is related to homophobia, sexual assault and relationship violence.

The film won the Excellence in Advocacy 2003 award from the Business and Professional Women USA organization.



UNI's Films on Social Justice series is sponsored by UNI's chapter of Amnesty International; the ACLU; the UNI Students for Social Justice; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Straight, Transgender Association (LGBTA); the Gender Equality Association (GEA); Iowans for a Free Palestine; the UNI Criminology Club; UNI Student AIDS Campaign; UNI Students Against a Violent Environment (SAVE); and the UNI Sociology & Anthropology Club.

The event is free and open to the public.

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Katherine van Wormer, a professor of social work at UNI, never once raised her eyebrows when victims of sexual abuse at the hands of Catholic priests began to tell their stories. Van Wormer said the whole notion of forced celibacy is unnatural, and is one of the causes of the rampant sexual abuse of children in the church. 'The priests are in a situation where they are fighting very natural impulses, and find a very easy opening with children. It sounds strange to say it, but this is a very normal reaction to a very abnormal situation.'

She was, however, surprised that as the media covered the scandal, the victims were most often portrayed d as men. In fact, she says, victims of this kind of abuse are overwhelmingly female.

For a recent study on the situation, van Wormer researched the experiences of several victims and said the reaction to the female victims tends to be different from that of an abused male. 'There is a distrust of women in sexual relationships and a belief that an adolescent girl is more mature than an adolescent boy,' van Wormer explained. 'So people think that the girl must have been doing something to cause the abuse.'

February 29, 2004 - 6:00pm

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Based on a study recently released by the National Violence Against Women Prevention Research Center, one in eight Iowa women will be victims of forcible rape in their lifetime.

'That doesn't count date rape, statutory rape or several others,' says Julie Thompson, coordinator of UNI's sexual assault services. 'Rape is the most unreported violent crime in the country.'''

National estimates are that only one in 10 women raped will report it. Those who know their assailant are even less likely to do so. 'The study found that there are certain demographic factors such as age groups, household income levels and ethnic populations who are more likely to be raped,' says Thompson. 'It's a call to action for more in-depth studies and better standardized policies to deal with rape.'

Contact:

Julie Thompson, coordinator of UNI's Sexual Assault Services, 319-273-2137, Julie.Thompson@uni.edu

Melissa Barber, University Marketing & Public Relations, 319-273-2761

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UNI triathlon challenge promotes wellness

The entire UNI Community Assistant staff of the Residence On The Hill (ROTH) complex has joined together to encourage one another to complete the second annual UNI Iron Man Triathlon Challenge. Each of the five staff members, led by James Barnes, ROTH complex graduate coordinator, has six weeks -- Jan. 26 to March 5 -- to complete a three-event challenge.

Iron Man participants will choose from the traditional triathlon: 24 miles of swimming, 112 miles of biking and 26.2 miles of running; the non-swimmers triathlon, 10,000 meters of rowing, 112 miles of biking and 26.2 miles of running; or the double triathlon, 58 miles of swimming, 224 miles of biking and 54.2 miles of running.

'The Iron Man Challenge is a way for the staff to encourage each other in wellness goals, to promote teambuilding and to help motivate each other to establish and maintain life-long healthy habits despite the cold weather,' said Barnes.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Eight University of Northern Iowa students have received scholarships through UNI's math department.

Carl and Wanda Wehner Mathematics and Computer Science Teaching scholarships were awarded to Michael Tetzloff, a senior math and technical education major from Marshalltown; Laura Waechter, a senior math education major from Marshalltown; and Andrew Schott, a senior math education major from Muscatine. The $1,500 Wehner scholarships are given each fall to students with a major in math teaching.



Melissa Potter, a senior math major from Coralville, received a $1,000 UNI Mathematics Alumni scholarship. Math majors Ken Doss, a junior from Clinton; Martha Aragon, a junior from Mexico City, Mexico; and Michelle Boelman, a senior from Mason City, all received $500 alumni scholarships.

Tricia Meyer, an elementary education major from Sioux City, was the recipient of the $2,000 Sorenson scholarship, which goes to an elementary education major with a minor in K-6 mathematics who shows outstanding promise as a teacher.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Wellness and Recreation Services (WRS) will host its first annual 'Paddle, Pedal, Pace' Indoor Triathlon for UNI students, faculty, staff and spouses, Sunday, March 7.

Participants will complete a 400-yard swim, a six-mile stationary-bike ride and a 1.5-mile run on the WRC indoor track. USA Triathlon rules will apply and each participant will have a race volunteer assigned for counting, timing and assessing violations.



The cost is $15 for WRC paid users, and $20 for those who are not. The race is limited to the first 48 contestants who register. The final day to register in the WRS office, WRC Room 101, is

March 3.



For more information, contact Reid Bartelt at (319) 273-7120.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's 'Films on Social Justice' series will continue with, 'Borderline Cases,' at 7 p.m., Thursday, March 4, in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108.

According to Chris Schwartz, president of UNI's Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), 'Borderline Cases' describes environmental problems caused by factories along the border between the United States and Mexico.

The film has won awards from The Other American Film Festival and The International Working Class Film & Video Festival.



UNI's Films on Social Justice series is sponsored by UNI's chapter of Amnesty International; the ACLU; the UNI Students for Social Justice; the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Straight, Transgender Association (LGBTA); the Gender Equality Association (GEA); Iowans for a Free Palestine; the UNI Criminology Club; UNI Student AIDS Campaign; UNI Students Against a Violent Environment (SAVE); and the UNI Sociology & Anthropology Club.

The event is free and open to the public.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Department of Philosophy & Religion will present a panel discussion on 'The Passion of the Christ,' at 7:30 p.m., Monday, March 8, in the Old Central Ballroom of Maucker Union.

Panelists will be Ken Atkinson, assistant professor; Harry Brod, professor; and Betty DeBerg, head; and James Robinson, associate professor; all in the Department of Philosophy & Religion.

Atkinson will discuss 'The Historical Accuracy of Mel Gibson's 'The Passion of the Christ': A Biblical Scholar's Perspective,' using archaeological and historical evidence pertaining to crucifixion and the Roman occupation of Jewish Palestine during the first century A.D.

Brod will talk about 'The Rise of Spectacular Christianity,' which considers the political, personal and aesthetic passions that led to Gibson's film, and reflects on ways in which the film may tell more about our own historical period than that of Jesus.

In 'Atonement and Mel Gibson,' DeBerg will explore Gibson's understanding of how the death of Jesus Christ affects humans' reconciliation with God, and consider ways in which one or more classic theories of atonement within the history of Christianity are visible in the film.

Robinson's 'Gibson's 'The Passion of the Christ': Another Battle in the Culture Wars,' will be a discussion of how the controversial issues of historicity, anti-Semitism and graphic violence associated with the film reflect the concerns of a liberal elite out of touch with many Americans for whom the film is a visual rendering of a sacred narrative.

The event is free and open to the public.

February 26, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'The Peace Community: Alternatives to Aggression in our Age of Militarism' will be the topic of a lecture at 7 p.m. Friday, March 5, in Sabin Hall, Room 102, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

Ella Cecilia Florez Alvarez, a leading Colombian peace activist, will give the address. As the director of communications for the community of San Jose de Apartado, Colombia, Florez will speak about her town's decision to become a 'peace community,' meaning the town is neutral and will not support any armed group in Colombia's civil war. She'll tell how that decision has forced displacement and killing of community members and how the community, along with others in a newly formed network of Colombia Communities in Resistance, remains strong in their commitment to nonviolence.

Live music will be featured before and after Florez's lecture. The event is free and open to the public.

The lecture is presented by Global Exchange, the Fellowship of Reconciliation, the American Civil Liberties Union, Amnesty International and the Students for Social Justice. The UNI Center for International Peace and Security Studies, UNI Multicultural Center, UNI Women Studies Department, UNI Center for Inter-American Studies and the UNI Graduate Studies in Public Policy are co-sponsors of the event.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Climbing Club will sponsor a climbing competition, open to all UNI students, faculty and staff, Saturday and Sunday, March 6 and 7, in the Wellness Recreation Center (WRC) on the UNI campus.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. Saturday. Saturday's competition begins at 10 a.m. Sunday's competition begins at 10:30 a.m.

Competitions in bouldering, speed climbing and route climbing will be offered. UNI participants will compete against each other as well as climbers from other universities.

The pre-registration cost to participate in one event is $25. For those who wish to compete in more than one event, the cost is $30. The cost is $35 for same-day sign-up.

This year marks the sixth annual climbing competition. 'The competition is growing each year,' said Andy Martin, WRS outdoors coordinator. 'Last year the competition drew 50 participants and this year we are expecting 80 or more to sign up.'

UNI's WRC features the highest climbing wall in the Midwest.

Registration forms can be picked up at the climbing wall, the Outdoor Rec office or downloaded at http://www.uni.edu/wellrec/outrec/outrec.htm. For more information contact the Outdoor Rec office, at 273-7163.



While the competition is limited to UNI students, faculty and staff, the public can attend the event for free.

February 25, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Substance Abuse Services will sponsor the conference, 'Cedar Valley Responsible Retailing Forum: Working Toward Collaboration,' from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Thursday, March 25 at the Waterloo Center for the Arts.

According to Julie Thompson, coordinator of UNI's Substance Abuse and Sexual Assault Services, the event will help retailers identify and implement innovative ways to help prevent the sale of age-restricted products including alcohol, tobacco and lottery tickets to minors.

Those encouraged to attend the free event are tobacco and liquor licensees, law enforcement officials, public health officials, substance abuse treatment/prevention professionals, students, parents, judicial system representatives and anyone interested in preventing youth access to age-restricted products.

Thompson said participants will learn about re-evaluating store training, hiring, and management policies to avoid sales-to-minors violations; increasing profitability by reducing civil penalties and suspensions from sales-to-minors; shaping state and local policy regarding responsible retailing; and enhancing understanding among stakeholders about the challenges of selling age-restricted products.

The forum will kick off with opening remarks from Renee Romano, UNI vice president for educational & student services; and Lynn M. Walding, administrator of the Iowa Alcoholic Beverages Division. Attendees will participate in discussions on 'The Integrated Responsible Retailing Forum Model,' and 'The Economics of Responsible Retailing.'

For reservation information, visit www.uni.edu/subabuse, or contact Nicole Gehl of the Iowa Alcoholic Beverages Division at (515) 281-7461, or Julie Thompson at (319) 273-2137.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Individual Events speech team traveled to Eau Claire, Wis. for the Wisconsin Love Fest Swing, Saturday, Feb. 14 and Sunday, Feb. 15, coming in third as a team.

Senior elementary education major Sara Gronstal, of Council Bluffs, brought home the gold in program oral interpretation and individual sweeps. She also placed second in prose, fourth in persuasion and fifth in duo, with senior culture and communication major Danielle Dick, of Dayton.

Dick took third in poetry, fifth in after dinner speaking and fourth in prose.

Mike Hilkin, a senior English major from Dubuque, took first in impromptu, second in extemporaneous speaking and fourth in persuasion and individual sweeps.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Faith, Fear and Leadership in a Post-9-11 World' is the topic of a University of Northern Iowa lecture to take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 4, at the Center for Multicultural Education on the UNI campus.

Television personality, inspirational speaker and church executive-minister-pastor, Angelique Walker-Smith, will deliver the lecture. Her address is free and open to the public.

Trained at Kent State, Yale and Princeton Universities, Walker-Smith is a member of the 'God Squad' on ABC's 'Good Morning America.' She has appeared as a commentator on CNN and the CBS Evening News. She was honored by former President Bill Clinton at the White House for her work in racial reconciliation, and is one of the youngest persons ever elected to the Central Committee of the World Council of Churches.

For more information, contact Michael Blackwell, UNI director for multicultural education, at

273-2250.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Women's Studies Program, and the international English honor society Sigma Tau Delta, will present a lecture, 'Accumulating Culture: Or, How to Be an Early Modern Learned Lady,' at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 2, in the Seerley Hall Great Reading Room.

Ezell is the John Paul Abbott professor of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University. Her presentation is part of the Women's History Month observation at UNI. It is free and open to the public.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's 'New Iowans' program and Iowa Public Television (IPTV), have received a $5,000 grant from the Independent Television Service (ITVS) to promote a Public Broadcasting System miniseries, 'The New Americans.' Also participating in the project is the UNI Museum.

Airing March 29-April 1, 'The New Americans' is a seven-hour series about the search for the American dream through the eyes of today's immigrants and refugees, including those from Nigeria, India, the Dominican Republic, Mexico and the West Bank.

In conjunction with this effort will be three community forums that will help Iowans understand life for new immigrants and refugees. Clips from 'The New Americans' will be shown, and panel discussions will follow. Panelists will include Mark Grey, director of the New Iowans program; Anne Woodrick, UNI associate professor of anthropology; and UNI President Robert Koob. Isreal Nwidor, a refugee from Nigeria, will be speaking at the forums in Cedar Falls and Des Moines. Nwidor, his wife and two small children fled the country after a military crackdown on protestors who had demanded more environmentally sound and economically just policies from the government and Shell Oil Corp.

At each forum, Grey will present his new book, 'The New Iowans -- A Companion Book to the PBS Miniseries, 'The New Americans.''



The forums begin at 7 p.m. and are as follows: Tuesday, March 9, at Trinity Lutheran Church in Des Moines; Thursday, March 11, at UNI's Curris Business Building; and Tuesday, March 23, at Music Man Square in Mason City.



In conjunction with the 'New Americans' series, the UNI Museum will present an exhibit, 'Welcoming New Iowans: A 200-Year Tradition,' February 4 through May 31.

Established at UNI in 1999, the New Iowans program is the brainchild of Grey, who authored the book, 'Welcoming New Iowans,' to augment the program. He and co-author Woodrick also have written a version of the book for Christian churches. Another is being written, in conjunction with UNI's Global Health Corps, for health providers. A version for businesses and employers is available on the Web at www.uni.edu/bcs/newiowans.

In 'Welcoming New Iowans,' Grey explains immigration, discusses the needs of the newcomers and community members, and talks about ways to address cultural differences and challenges.

Over the past few years, Iowa has become a settling site for immigrants and refugees for a number of reasons. First, says Grey, is the state's meat packing industry, which provides ample employment opportunities. 'Of course, they may come for those jobs,' Grey says, 'but they slowly and surely filter out to other kinds of employment. This is important as it demonstrates how our economy is increasingly dependent on them.'

Immigration is, says Grey, a workforce and economic development issue.

'A lot of us have looked at demographics trends and we are concerned. Birth rates are down, and the workforce is aging rapidly. And then there's the painful reminder that 40 percent of the state's college graduates leave the state. We believe immigrants can make up for part of the shortfall.'

ITVS's mission is to create and present independently produced programs that engage creative risks, advance issues and represent points of view not usually presented.

For more information, contact Grey at (319) 273-3029.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Women's Studies programs at the University of Northern Iowa will observe March as Women's History Month through a series of events. Unless noted, events are free and open to the public.

The events are as follows:

Monday, March 1, CROW Forum Lecture, 'Negotiating Truth: Postcolonial Adventures in Transnational Space,' by Deidre Bucher Heistad, assistant professor of modern languages, noon, Baker Hall, Room 161.

Tuesday, March 2, lecture, 'Accumulating Culture, Or How to be an Early Modern Learned Lady,' by Margaret Ezell, John Paul Abbott Professor of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University, 7 p.m., Seerley Hall Great Reading Room.



Thursday-Saturday, March 4-6, Theatre UNI/UNI School of Music production, 'The Tender Land,' 7:30 p.m., Strayer-Wood Theater. For tickets, call (319) 273-6381.

Tuesday, March 9, public reading of 'Feminism is for Everybody,' a book by bell hooks. UNI students and staff will read aloud from the book continuously throughout the day, beginning at 9 a.m. in the Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge.

Tuesday, March 9, lecture by Jamaican author Patricia Powell, at 7:30 p.m. in the Center for Multicultural Education.

Friday, March 12, Women on Fridays: Video Viewpoints, 'The Hazards of Helen,' a viewing of the film series produced between 1914 and 1917 and starring Helen Holmes, celebrated silent-screen serial queen; noon to 1:30 p.m., Baker Hall, Room161.

Wednesday, March 24, lecture, 'Justice Undressed: Law, Sexuality & Politics in Third Republic France,' by Sara Kimble, assistant professor of history, at 7 p.m. in Seerley Hall Room 115.

Thursday, March 25, 'Oh No, My Parent is a Feminist,' a discussion by children and their feminist parents, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in Baker Hall, Room 161.



Thursday, March 25, Joy Cole Corning Distinguished Lecture Series, Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, 7:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. Admission is free but tickets are required. For tickets, call (319) 273-SHOW.

Friday, March 26, forum, 'The Changing Face of Iowa: Tapping Resources for Successful Aging,' with Toni Calasanti of Virginia Tech University, at 6:30 p.m., in the Center for Energy and Environmental Education.

Monday, March 29, Women and War Conference, beginning at 9 a.m. in the Old Central Ballroom (formerly Maucker Union Expansion).



Monday, March 29, Women's Studies Spring Reception, 'The Book That Changed My Life,' at 3:15 p.m. in Baker Hall, Room 161.

Tuesday, March 30, Off-Hudson Series of Staged Readings, 'Tea,' directed by Cynthia Goatley, director of the department of theatre, at 7:30 p.m., in the Communication Arts Center, Room 108.



Wednesday-Saturday, March 31-April 3, Interpreters Theatre production, 'Barbie Undone,' adapted and directed by Karen Mitchell, associate professor of communication studies; and Brianne Waychoff, graduate assistant in the Women's Studies program, at 7:30 p.m. in Lang Hall, Room 40.

February 24, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will host a Job and Internship Fair for UNI students and alumni Wednesday, March 3, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., in the Maucker Union Ballroom.

The fair will feature more than 60 organizations with business, human services and government opportunities throughout the United States. These organizations are seeking individuals from all academic fields for permanent employment or internships. Several employers will select students to interview during the Interview Day on Thursday, March 4.

Among the organizations that will be represented at the fair are: CIGNA Corporation, Cambrex, Dubuque Police Department, Maytag Corporation, Lands' End, Pella Corporation, State Farm Insurance, Target Stores, Rockwell Collins and Enterprise Rent-A-Car.

'We are pleased to see sustained interest in UNI students and alumni from so many organizations,' said Libby Vanderwall, UNI Career Center events coordinator. 'UNI students will find quality employment and internship opportunities at this event.'

There are no pre-registration requirements for this free walk-in-event, but participants are encouraged to dress as if for an interview and to bring several copies of their resume. For a full listing of organizations that will be at the fair, visit the UNI Career Center home page at www.uni.edu/careercenter/.

This event is sponsored by the UNI Career Center.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa faculty, staff and students traveled to Kansas City, Jan. 2 to Jan. 5 to attend the 2004 American Humanics Management Institute (AHMI).

AHMI is an educational symposium for nonprofit management. More than 500 students from 70 colleges and universities across the country travel to AHMI each year.



Representing UNI at AHMI was Gordon Mack, executive director of UNI's American Humanics (AH) program; Chris Edgington, professor and director of UNI's School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services; and Stacy Van Gorp, project director of UNI's Opportunity Works.



Mack served as associate dean of the institute and Edgington presented the workshop, 'Youth-Centered Program Planning.' Van Gorp conducted the workshop, 'Demystifying Grant Writing.'

Cyanna Alm, senior leisure service major from Camanche, served as liaison to the 2004 AHMI Student Advisory Council.

The UNI AH student association presented the workshop, 'AH Student Association Best Practices: University of Northern Iowa.'

Students participating were: Andrew Carlsen, senior leisure services major from Manly; Jared Ehmen, senior general studies major from Missouri Valley; Jennifer Hamlin, senior leisure services major form Van Horne; Heidi Kriegel, junior leisure services major from Brooklyn; Lisa Lang, senior general studies major from Belle Plaine; Ryan Neumann, senior leisure services major from Urbandale; Jama Ohrt, junior leisure services major from Vinton; Brandon Schroeder, senior leisure services major from Cedar Rapids; Heather Shelangoski, senior family services major from Cedar Rapids; and Paul Toppin, senior leisure services major from Cedar Falls.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A group of University of Northern Iowa students were inducted into Beta Gamma Sigma for the 2003-2004 academic year.

(Student's name), a (classification) (major) major, was inducted into the Beta Gamma Sigma honor society at UNI. (He/she) is the (son/daughter) of (parent's names), (hometown).

To be eligible for membership into Beta Gamma Sigma, students must be in the upper 7 percent of the junior class, the upper 10 percent of the senior class, or the upper 20 percent of the master's class.

HOMETOWN STUDENT'S NAME/PARENT'S NAME/CLASSIFICATION/MAJOR

Altoona Sunny Jo Darling Roeder, Jan and Doug Darling, masters, accounting

Ames Shannon Holt, Bill and Carolyn Holt, senior, marketing and interior design

Ankeny Andrea Smiens, Craig and Cyndi Smiens, junior, finance

Audubon Amanda Mullenger, Ron and Darla Mullenger, senior, accounting

Bellevue Marsha Cloos, Mark and Marlene Cloos, senior, finance and real estate

Bennett Heather Hartwig, Keith and Deb Hartwig, senior, marketing

Cascade Amanda Knuth, senior, accounting

Clear Lake Jamie Loos, Gary and Karen Loos, junior, economics

Council Bluffs Kyle Vanderhelm, Steve and Becky Vanderhelm, junior, economics

Earlham Amanda Silverthorn, Nancy Silverthorn, junior, accounting

Eldridge Memorea Schrader, Randy and Denise Schrader, junior, human resources

Hudson Susan Patterson, Hugh and Vicki Patterson, junior, economics

Jesup Christopher Glen Higdon, Darryl and Mary Higdon, senior, management information systems

Jesup Sheri Reuter, Larry and Deb Reuter, junior, finance and economics, business analysis

Manson Kelli McCaulley, Shari McCaulley, junior, business teaching

Marhsalltown Sarah Clemens, William and Rebecca Clemens, junior, business management

Mason City Michelle Boelman, Stan and Linda Boelman, senior, actuarial science and accounting

Mason City Bobbi A. Engleman, Bruce and Glennys Engleman, senior, marketing

Monroe James McConeghey, Mark and Jane McConeghey, senior, accounting

Nashua Laura Seamans, Lawrnie and Patty Seamans, junior, human resource management and organizational communication

New Hampton Sarah Eichenberger, Carol and Gene Gratz, Jim Eichenberger, junior, accounting

Norfolk Jason Cope, Pamela and Donald Cope, senior, marketing

Ottumwa Joseph Klodt, Richard and Nancy Klodt, senior, management information systems

Sioux City Scott Heinrichs, Kevin and Sue Heinrichs, senior, accounting

St. Ansgar Gary Landherr, Tom and Elaine Landherr, senior, accounting

Vinton Jennifer Germaine, Jim and Linda Germaine, junior, accounting

Vinton Brook Runyan, Steve and Jama Runyan, junior, accounting

Wilton Andrew McQuillen, Thomas and Deborah McQuillen, senior, business education

Brooklyn Park, Min. Kelly Irlbeck, Al and Terri Irlbeck, junior, accounting and Spanish

Omaha, Neb. Steven C. Allen, Craig and Vicki Allen, junior, accounting

February 23, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Minority Graduate Student Association (MGSA) will host a comedy show to conclude Black History Month. Featuring Benji Brown of Black Entertainment Television's 'Comic View,' the show begins at 7 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 28, in Lang Hall Auditorium.

The comedian also has appeared on HBO's 'Def Comedy Jam,' and recently co-starred in the hip-hop comedy movie, 'A Miami Tail.'

The event is free and open to the public.

MGSA is comprised of graduate students interested in issues that affect students of color in higher education. Membership is open to all undergraduate and graduate students at UNI.

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Tuesday, Feb. 24

Russian videoconference. The UNI Center for Educational Technology will conduct a 'Russian-American Studies in Human Geography' course via video-conferencing over the Internet. Connecting to Herzon University in St. Petersburg, Russia, the course may be observed on the following Tuesdays, from 9 to 10:45 a.m., Feb. 24, March 2 and 9.

Thursday, Feb. 26

'Meth and More.' Representatives of the U.S. Department of Justice will present 'Meth and More' in Curris Business Building, Room 109, at 6 p.m. The multimedia presentation will cover the drug crisis in Iowa communities and efforts to combat the use and sale of meth and club drugs.

Improv performance. Half-Masted 3.2, an improvisational theatre troupe, will present 'Improv! Improv! Improv!' at 7:30 p.m. in the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

Friday, Feb. 27

Entrepreneurs to gather at UNI. The third annual Collegiate Entrepreneurs Iowa Conference will take place

at UNI's Maucker Union, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Friday, Feb. 27. Katherine Cota-Uyar, program manager for UNI's John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, said about 350 college and university students, faculty and staff from across the state will attend.

Improv performance. Half-Masted 3.2, an improvisational theatre troupe, will present 'Improv! Improv! Improv!' at 7:30 p.m. in the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

Saturday, Feb. 28

Comedy show. Featuring Benji Brown of Black Entertainment Television's 'Comic View,' the show begins at 7 p.m. in Lang Hall Auditorium.



Improv performance. Half-Masted 3.2, an improvisational theatre troupe, will present 'Improv! Improv! Improv!' at 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. in the Strayer-Wood Theatre.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Hispanic Latino Student Union (HLSU) will host its annual Latino Ball, 'Moving Forward' from 6 p.m. to midnight, Saturday, March 6 at the Slife Ballroom, in the UNI Commons.

The evening will include a live performance by the mariachi band 'Las Guitarras de Mexico;' a speech by three-time Olympian, Ruben Gonzales (luge); dancing to the beats of DJ Chilangos and a performance by the UNI Dance Team. Contests, prizes and free refreshments will be available.

Dinner tickets are $10 and can be purchased from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 26 in Maucker Union.

For ticket information, contact HLSU's Lydia Roberts at (319) 273-5910, or Dalia Saucedo at dalia@uni.edu.

February 22, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Negotiating Truth: Postcolonial Adventures in Transnational Space ' will be the topic of the next CROW Forum lecture at noon, Monday, March 1, in Baker Hall, Room 161, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.

The lecture will be given by Deirdre Bucher Heistad, assistant professor of modern languages at UNI.

Heistad will examine the ways in which some French-speaking women writers, including Malika Mokeddem of Algeria, Calixthe Beyala of Cameroon, and Evelyn Accad of Lebanon, confront identity issues.



'These writers construct new visions of identity that advance hybridity over purity and pluralism over essentialism in such a way as to explode old categories of description that have failed to acknowledge both women's strengths and sufferings,' said Heistad.



Admission is free and open to the public.

The CROW (Current Research on Women) Forum series is sponsored by UNI's Graduate Program in Women's Studies.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Microsoft Excel,' a course that introduces the basic commands and capabilities of Microsoft Excel, and more advanced topics, will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC), in partnership with Ketels Contract Training.

The three-module course will run Fridays, March 5, 12, and 26, from 8 a.m. to noon, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo, and will be taught by Chris McGregor-Case. There will be no class held on March 19.

Module one will cover beginning topics, module two will introduce intermediate skills and module three will address more advanced issues. For a detailed description of the topics being covered, visit the Excel Training page at www.contracttraining.com.

Participants may take any of the three courses for $115 each, or all three courses for $299. The registration deadline for the first module is noon, Wednesday, March 3. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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The third annual Collegiate Entrepreneurs Iowa Conference will take place at UNI's Maucker Union, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Friday, Feb. 27. Katherine Cota-Uyar, program manager for UNI's John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, said about 350 college and university students, faculty and staff from across the state will attend.

Among the speakers will be Bill Krause, president and CEO of Krause Gentle Corp., and owner of 350 Kum & Go stores in 13 states and 19 other companies; Dan Leese, COO of Beringer Blass Wine Estates in Napa Valley, Calif.; Jerome Conway, president of Austin Sonics Inc., a management company serving 101 Sonic restaurants; Dan Schmitt, president of Anthony, Allen & Quinn, a family of seven businesses; and speakers from Collegiate VIP. Cota-Uyar said other speakers will include successful young entrepreneurs.

Contacts:

Katherine Cota-Uyar, program manager, John Papajohn Entrepreneurial Center, (319) 273-7350

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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On anniversary of first witch trial, UNI professor defends Wiccan religion

It was Feb. 29, 1692, when authorities in Salem, Massachusetts Bay Colony, arrested Sarah Good, the first woman in the United States to be charged with practicing witchcraft. Before it was over, there would be more than 150 imprisonments for the charge; and several deaths by hanging, burning at the stake and torture.

Although it's been more than 300 years since anyone was burned at the stake for practicing witchcraft, witches still experience disapproval and in some cases, religious persecution. James Robinson, associate professor of philosophy & religion at UNI, says 'There is still a sense that anyone worshipping any deity other than the Christian God is worshipping Satan, and that you do so at the risk of your soul.'

He explains that the Wiccan religion is an ancient nature-based religion that emphasizes harmony and peace, and finds the divine in natural forces. The religion was marginalized and eventually demonized by Christian missionaries, who saw Wiccans as competitors. 'Eventually, being a witch became a dangerous thing. Oftentimes they knew about natural healing methods, and some believe they also knew about poisons and had the ability to curse people and bring misfortune upon them. So having a witch in the area could lead to all sorts of very bad happenings.'

Contact:

James Robinson, associate professor, philosophy & religion, (319) 273-2507

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Survival training for college -- it's a jungle out there

Transitions are always challenging. The transition from high school to college, or from community college to a university can be especially difficult. The academic demands and social opportunities are new to many people.

'It can help to have some guidance and ideas for adapting to a new environment,' says David Towle, licensed psychologist and director of the University of Northern Iowa's Counseling Center.

Contacts:

David Towle, director, UNI Counseling Center & Office of Disability Services, (319) 273-2676, david.towle@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 283-2761

February 19, 2004 - 6:00pm

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UNI will open its new Center for International Peace & Security Studies with an inaugural address by Rep. Jim Leach at 10 a.m. Monday, Feb. 23 in Maucker Union. Leach will discuss, 'Progress in the War on Terrorism.' The public may attend at no charge. At 2 p.m., Leach will lecture a class in Sabin Hall, Room 129.

The Center for International Peace & Security Studies is housed within the Department of Political Science. It is designed to foster discussion, research and teaching about international conflicts and the meaning of security in the 21st century.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Two 'Organizing Essentials' classes, 'Task and Time Management' and 'Taming the Paper Tiger at Work: Optimizing Your Paper and Electronic Filing Systems,' will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC), in partnership with Krisalis, Inc.

Both classes will take place from 9 a.m. to noon, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo, and will be taught by Kris Pond-Burtis, Ph.D., professional organizer and owner of Krisalis, Inc.

'Task and Time Management,' a course to teach participants simple and easy ways to prioritize to-do lists and calendars using the Get Organized (GO) Systems Seminar, will be offered Tuesday, March 2. 'Taming the Paper Tiger,' a course to help participants design customized, effective and organized filing systems, will be offered Tuesday, March 9.

These classes are appropriate for owners and staff of small and home-based businesses; and top-level administrators, managers, supervisors and administrative staff of larger businesses.

Participants may take one course for $59, or both courses for $99. The registration deadline for 'Task and Time Management' is noon, Friday, Feb. 27. The deadline for 'Taming the Paper Tiger' is noon, March 5. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa student, Sarah Carlson, was a winner at the Fort Dodge Young Artists Competition, held in January in Fort Dodge.

Carlson, a junior vocal performance major from Rockwell City, and daughter of Tom and Nancy Carlson, was one of three winners in the Collegiate Division. She performed 'Rusalka's Song to the Moon' from 'Rusalka' by Dvorak. As a winner, Carlson will perform in the Fort Dodge Area Symphony Young Artists Concert at 2 p.m., April 25, at the Phillips Middle School Auditorium in Fort Dodge.

Thirty students competed against Carlson in her division. Her vocal instructor is Jean McDonald, UNI associate professor of music.

February 18, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Association of Educational Office Professionals (AEOP) will host the workshop, 'AEOP in Motion . . . Imagine, Believe, Achieve,' from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday, March 15 in the Curris Business Building.

Pat Galasso, a certified business-planning trainer from Clear Lake, will give the keynote address, 'Managing Stress in Your Personal and Professional Life.'

Workshop topics will include 'Investments versus Financial Goals;' 'Point A to B: Driving Toward Life Goals;' 'Putting Yourself First: the Power of Recreation and Relaxation;' 'Women and Personal Finance;' 'Business Etiquette: Back to the Basics' and Principles and Elements of Design for Publications and Presentations.'

The workshop is open to all educational office professionals.

Participants may earn one-half of one Continuing Education Unit (CEU) by attending the workshop for the entire day. CEU forms will be available at the workshop.

Registration deadline for the event is Friday, Feb. 27.

For more information, contact Judy Dieken, AEOP president, at (319) 273-2422 or check out the AEOP Web site: http://www.uni.edu/aeop.

February 17, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Introductory Bookkeeping for Small Business,' a primer course to help small business owners understand business finances, will be offered by the University of Northern Iowa Regional Business Center (RBC).

The three-hour workshop is offered the last Saturday of each month from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. The next two workshops will take place on Saturday, Feb. 28, and Saturday March 27, at the RBC office, 212 E. Fourth St., Waterloo. The instructors will be accountants, Kathy and Don Frey.

Participants will learn how to read and understand basic financial statements such as profit and loss statements, balance sheets and cash flows. The course also will cover bank reconciliations, record keeping and tax requirements for small businesses in Iowa.

The cost is $30 per person. The registration deadline for the February class is noon, Wednesday, Feb. 25. For more information, contact the UNI RBC at (319) 236-8123, or visit www.unirbc.org.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- For nearly a year, the religious world has anticipated the release of Mel Gibson's controversial film, 'The Passion of The Christ,' with both fear and elation. Some say the film, which depicts the last 12 hours of Jesus Christ's life, will incite anti-Semitism. Others believe it is a glorious testament to Christ's sacrifice, and still others debate its historical accuracy.



Ken Atkinson, UNI assistant professor of religion and philosophy, said concerns about the film have arisen for a variety of reasons. Atkinson holds three graduate degrees in biblical studies, and reads in first-century Aramaic, the language in which the 'The Passion' was filmed. He is the author of a new book on the Dead Sea scrolls and their importance in any study of the crucifixion, and has excavated at many biblical sites.

First, he explained, Gibson belongs to a splinter group of Catholicism that subscribes to pre-Vactican II ideals. Among other things, Vatican II, a series of proclamations, did away with the notion that Jews were responsible for the crucifixion of Christ, and opened a groundbreaking dialogue between the two faiths. 'There is concern that Gibson is not really aware of the scholarship and the beliefs of today's Catholic church, and that may have led him to insert errors into the film,' explained Atkinson.

Second, says Atkinson, the movie focuses heavily on the torture and gory details of the crucifixion. 'Many Christians may have trouble with that. The New Testament doesn't have extensive descriptions of the suffering of Christ. For Christians, Christ's life was more important than his crucifixion. And while the crucifixion was, of course, important, the gory details were not.'

The larger issues, charges of anti-Semitism and lack of historical accuracy, will have to be decided at a later date. Atkinson, who has not seen the film, says it probably is not anti-Semitic, but understands how it might be perceived as such. He said the film shows Jewish leaders saying the crucifixion will leave blood on their hands, and the hands of their children. After criticism, Gibson removed the subtitles to that effect, but left in the spoken words in Aramaic. 'That's a very sensitive statement,' Atkinson said. 'Jews have been persecuted on those grounds for centuries.'

Atkinson said that only Romans had the authority to crucify anyone during that time period. Further, because the Jewish high priest was appointed by the Romans -- and therefore beholden to them -- many argue that Christ's trial wasn't even legitimate.

Atkinson went on to say the 'blood on our hands' statement would be historically inaccurate, too, as Jews do not believe in the inheritance of sin. In fact, historical accuracy would be difficult on any level. The four gospels that present Christ's life and death -- Matthew, Mark, Luke and John -- differ on crucial points, including the date of the crucifixion. 'In the first three gospels, Jesus celebrates Passover, and that becomes the basis for the Lord's Supper or Eucharist, and is then crucified. In John, he is crucified before Passover. So you can't quite harmonize the two,' Atkinson said.

Because no one is sure how first-century Aramaic actually sounds, questions abound about the authenticity of the language used in the film.



He summed up by noting that the lack of context in the film might be troubling for some viewers. 'You look at it and you don't know why Christ is being persecuted, why he's being made to suffer this way,' said Atkinson, who explained that during the years leading up to the crucifixion, Jews had been afraid that Pontius Pilate, the ranking officer in Judea, would strike against them as repayment for Christ's continued rants against the Romans.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa Associate Professor of Biology, Laura L. Jackson, was a featured speaker at the 28th annual meeting of the Ecological Society of Australia (ESA), in Armidale, New South Wales, Australia in December, 2003.

Jackson's experience at the ESA conference supported her belief that U.S. farmers and environmentalists can learn from other countries about how to conserve native plant and animal species while still using the land for agriculture.

'The whole world is facing the same basic question about water quality, protecting soil and protecting wild plants and animals,' said Jackson. 'How do we conserve nature and make a living?'

'Pasture Cropping,' is a farming system used by the Australians to protect soil by growing wheat on top of native pasture and allows the perennial grasses to grow back after harvest. This is one idea Jackson would like to raise awareness about in the United States. She thinks a form of 'pasture cropping' is something Iowa producers should experiment with.

Jackson plans to incorporate what she learned in Australia directly in her classroom, where she teaches environmental studies.

While at the conference, Jackson presented a North American view of the influence ecologists have on agriculture, for the symposium 'Managing Profitable and Biodiverse Production Systems: Linking Policy, Research and Practice.' Her lecture was 'Shaping Biodiverse Production Systems in Collaboration with Producers, Consumers and Agricultural Scientists.'

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's National Roadside Vegetation Center (NRV), will present world traveler and environmental activist Bill Mohrwinkel at 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 23 in UNI's Center for Energy and Environmental Education (CEEE).

Mohrwinkel will speak about his more than 10 years of traveling in the Arctic region. He will show his slides from rafting, hiking, canoeing and kayaking through the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR).

'Bill has experienced firsthand the beauty and biological diversity of the ANWR,' said Kirk Henderson, roadside program manager of UNI's National Roadside Vegetation Center. 'Unfortunately, not everyone appreciates that beauty. Nearly every year, the international oil industry attempts to persuade U.S. legislators that the ANWR is a 'barren wasteland' where intense oil development would do no harm.'

Parking for the event is available northwest of the CEEE. For more information, contact Henderson at (319) 273-2183.

February 16, 2004 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Black Identity and Getting Past Race,' the fourth lecture in this year's Hearst Lecture Series at the University of Northern Iowa, will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 24, in the Maucker Union Center for Multicultural Education at UNI.

John McWhorter, one of America's leading linguists and a recognized authority on race and diversity, will deliver the address. The series is sponsored by the UNI Department of Communicative Disorders, host for this year's series, and is centered around the theme, 'Human Communication: Science and Disorders.'

McWhorter holds a Ph.D. in linguistics from Stanford University and specializes in Creole languages and typology.

He is the author of 'The Word on the Street: Fact and Fiction About American English' and 'the Missing Spanish Creoles: Recovering the Birth of Plantation Creole Languages.' His book 'Loosing the Race: Self-Sabotage in Black America,' addresses language use and modern race issues in America. His most recent book, 'The Power of Babel,' is an introduction to language change, language mixture and dialects worldwide for the general public.

A reception will follow McWhorter's address. The event is free and open to the public.

The Hearst Lecture Series is supported by the Meryl Norton Hearst Chair in the UNI College of Humanities and Fine Arts. It was created by an endowment from James Schell Hearst, author, poet and professor of creative writing at UNI from 1941 until his retirement in 1975. The series engages scholars and experts from outside the university to share their expertise, viewpoints and theoretical frameworks.

The next speaker in the series, on April 1, will be Soma Mukhadophay and her teen-age son, Tito, speaking on Rapid Prompting Method, a teaching method for children with autism.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's physics and mathematics departments have been awarded a one-year $9,000 planning grant by the Sloan Foundation and the Council of Graduate Schools to help investigate implementing professional science masters (PSM) programs in industrial mathematics and applied physics.

A new kind of master's degree, the PSM in science or mathematics is for students interested in a wider variety of career options than provided by current graduate programs in math and science. The new masters programs will prepare students for work in fields such as consulting, scientific research and development support, insurance, and technology transfer.

Jerry Ridenhour, head of the department of mathematics, and Cliff Chancey, head of the department of physics, will lead the grant activities. Activities will include surveying Iowa and regional businesses about their perceived needs for science master's-level employees and working with those employers to design an appropriate education package.

Because PSM programs typically have a business school component, Ridenhour and Chancey will work with the UNI College of Business Administration to design a miniature MBA component for the program.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Malcolm Price Laboratory School (PLS) has named Dusty Johnson band director for all levels of the bands in fifth through 12th grades.

Johnson graduated from Luther College with a degree in music and brings with him experience at the elementary, middle and high school levels. He presented a paper titled 'A Historical Survey of Tuning and Temperament' at the National Conference of Undergraduate Research at the University of Utah. He also completed a research grant last summer, 'Figured Bass of Trumpet Sonata ï¾– Edward Finch,' an early 18th century canon at York Ministry and Canterbury Cathedral, which is in the process of being published. In addition, Johnson served as the drum major for the Dubuque Colts Drum and Bugle Corps from 2000 to 2001.

Johnson has studied music in England, Germany and Austria.

'It's quite a thrill to conduct such a fine high school band,' Johnson said. 'They are playing selections from the movie 'Gladiator' and are doing a heck of a job conveying the ferocity of a barbarian horde. I also love the opportunity to work with younger students.'

Johnson replaces former PLS band director, Leonard Upham, who is now teaching educational psychology at UNI.

'We were looking for a quality professional to continue providing our students an outstanding instrumental music program,' said PLS interim director Nadene Davidson. 'Dusty brings some great experiences and active research interests to support the full PLS mission.'

February 15, 2004 - 6:00pm

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As the current pop princess Britney Spears undulates her way through one video after another, baring her impossibly flat tummy and flexing her narrow thighs, adolescent girls nationwide are trying to emulate that look. And it's not just her clothes or dance style they want to copy, but her body image as well.

Diane Depken, associate professor in the UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, notes that National Eating Disorders Week kicks off Feb. 22. 'While obesity as a health risk is receiving so much attention, we need to understand that overeating, eating disorders and body image issues have a great deal in common; cultural norms that promote unhealthy eating patterns and relentless images of thin, young bodies.'

Depken says American girls are reminded daily -- via television, magazines, catalogs and mannequins -- that the only way for them to achieve happiness is to achieve thinness. 'You might see some television commercials out there showing a woman with a larger body, but she's usually cleaning the toilet bowl,' says Depken. 'Girls learn early on that being a woman means worrying about your weight.'

Contact:

Diane Depken, associate professor, School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, (319) 273-7287

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Eating disorders team educates campus about dangers of unhealthy eating patterns

Because eating disorders are particularly complex, UNI's University Health Services has established a three-person team -- a physician, a counselor and a health educator -- to help those who are diagnosed with this illness.

Martha Ochoa, MD, works with the medical complications and indications of an eating disorder. Jennifer Murra, counselor, deals with the mental and emotional aspects; and Joan Thompson, health educator, works with the practical side of learning how to eat normally in the college environment.

'Together we can come to some agreement on how best this person might be helped,' explains Thompson. 'This approach has been extremely helpful in allowing some students to stay in school as they recover. Other times, we come to the consensus that an individual would best be helped by an inpatient treatment program.'

Contacts:

Jennifer Murra, counselor, UNI Counseling Center, (319) 273-2676, jennifer.murra@uni.edu

Martha Ochoa, physician, University Health Center, (319) 273-2009, martha.ochoa@uni.edu

Joan Thompson, health educator, wellness/recreation services, (319) 273-2198, joan.thompson@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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'Feminine Mystique' lives on

It was Feb. 19, 1963, when Betty Friedan published the groundbreaking 'The Feminine Mystique.' The book, based on surveys of women who had been Friedan's classmates in 1942, called on sociey to allow women to define themselves as something other than mothers and wives. Susan Hill, director of UNI's undergraduate program in Women's Studies, says fallout from the book was both positive and negative. 'The positive is that women no longer have so much social pressure to be solely mothers. But the book also contributed to the notion of feminism as anti-mother, or anti-stay-at-home-mother. As with most social changes, there are good and bad things, and sometimes good things come from the struggles.'

For example, says Hill, Friedan labeled lesbians 'the lavender menace,' and indicated they were problematic for the women's movement. That spurred lesbians to attend, in huge numbers, the 1970 Second Congress to UnitedWomen, where they discussed their relationships with straight women. 'And that changed the way a lot of people thought about lesbians,' Hill explains.

Contact:

Susan Hill, director, undergraduate program in Women's Studies, (319) 273-7177, susan.hill@uni.edu

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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Grief is not a three-day thing

Death, grief and loss are topics Americans often avoid. In fact, national polls report that many people think the average time necessary to grieve the death of a loved-one is three to five days, when in fact grief can last more than a year.

According to David Towle, licensed psychologist and director of the University of Northern Iowa's Counseling Center, college is often the first time people have to face significant losses. 'The death of parents, grandparents or friends is life-changing and we may never really completely finish grieving such a loss. While each person's grief process is unique, it can be very helpful to understand some common elements that we go through in coping with loss,' says Towle.

Contacts:

David Towle, director, UNI Counseling Center & Office of Disability Services, (319) 273-2676, david.towle@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 283-2761

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Being shy won't get you anywhere

Research shows that assertive people who can stand up for themselves and say 'no' have a better chance of achieving success. College is often the first time young people are challenged to develop appropriate assertiveness skills.

According to David Towle, licensed psychologist and director of the University of Northern Iowa's Counseling Center, students have better relationships and better self-esteem if when they are able to appropriately communicate their feelings and thoughts. 'It's important to accept that we have the right to ask for what, we want and it certainly helps to learn the language of assertiveness,' says Towle.

Contacts:

David Towle, director, UNI Counseling Center & Office of Disability Services, (319) 273-2676, david.towle@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 283-2761

February 12, 2004 - 6:00pm

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet at the University of Iowa, Wednesday and Thursday, Feb. 18 and 19. Specific times for discussion of most items are unknown. The docket is available on the Web at http://www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html

1. Biennial report on university public radio stations

The report outlines how the three regent universities' public radio stations are serving the state, and how they are developing a strategic plan for collaboration. This report is scheduled to be discussed at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18.

Background:

KUNI-FM and KHKE-FM are broadcast services of the University of Northern Iowa, with facilities located on the third floor of the UNI Communication Arts Center.

KUNI broadcasts 24 hours a day, seven days a week with 100,000 watts from a 2,000-foot tower located at Walker, Iowa, covering most of eastern Iowa, plus parts of northwestern Illinois and southwestern Wisconsin.

Major cities served by the station's main signal at 90.9 FM include Cedar Falls, Waterloo, Cedar Rapids and Iowa City. Translator signals bring KUNI to Dubuque at 98.7 FM, Des Moines at 101.7 FM, Eldridge at 102.1 FM and the Quad Cities (Davenport/Bettendorf, Iowa and Moline/Rock Island, Illinois) at 94.5 FM. North-central Iowa receives KUNI's programming on 8,000-watt 'repeater' station KUNY, broadcasting at 91.5 FM from facilities at North Iowa Area Community College in Mason City. Northern Iowa and southern Minnesota can receive KUNI's programming on repeater station KRNI-1010 AM from Mason City.

KHKE broadcasts 24 hours a day, seven days a week with 10,000 watts from a 400-foot tower near Waterloo. Coverage in northeast Iowa is within 60 miles of Waterloo. A translator signal at 90.7 FM serves Mason City and Clear Lake in north-central Iowa.

Contacts:

John Hess, director of broadcasting services, KUNI, (319) 273-6406

James Lubker, dean, College of Humanities & Fine Arts, (319) 273-2725

2. Tuition and fee policies report

The Board of Regents is exploring issues and best practices associated with tuition and fees policies.

Contacts:

Renee Romano, vice president for educational & student services, (319) 273-2331

Roland Carrillo, director of financial aid, (319) 273-2701

3. Fiscal year 2004 budget

Contact:

Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance, (319) 273-2382

4. Miscellaneous student fees

Contact:

Renee Romano, vice president for educational & student services, (319) 273-2331

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Although many universities have seen a dramatic decrease in international enrollment since 9/11, UNI has experienced an increase. In fall 2002, UNI had 366 international students, and in spring 2003 had 353. In fall 2003, the university enrolled 384 international students, and enrolled 394 in the following spring.

Kristi Marchesani, assistant director of admissions/international, explained the increase. 'UNI has remained committed to the recruitment of international students despite the world climate and the declining interest abroad in studying in the United States. We have been very aggressive and creative in our efforts to reach out to international students to let them know that they are very welcome on our campus and that we will assist them through the application and visa process.'

Contact:

Kristi Marchesani, assistant director of admissions/international, (319) 273-2281

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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MPLS celebrates Black History and Presidents Day with visit from Abe Lincoln

National-award-winning Abraham Lincoln impersonator, Jim Conine, will perform at UNI's Malcolm Price Laboratory School (MPLS), Monday, Feb. 16. Performances are as follows:

8:45 to 9 a.m., MPLS library

9:30 to 10:30 a.m., MPLS library

12:15 to 1:15 p.m., MPLS auditorium

1:30 to 2:30 p.m. MPLS auditorium

He will be available to the media between 10:30 and noon. Those interested in talking with him should contact Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761.

Contact:

Amy Lockhart, instructor, 319) 273-2209

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations (3219) 273-2761

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UNI students to lobby at state capitol

Monday, Feb. 16 is Regents Universities Day at the state capitol. Students from UNI, the University of Iowa and Iowa State University will host a news conference at 1:15 p.m. to discuss the impact of recent budget cuts. Gov. Tom Vilsack will address those attending.

'Students need to let legislators know that the cuts are negatively affecting them,' says Jessica Jobe, director of public relations for the Northern Iowa Student Government.

Contacts:

Jessica Jobe, director of public relations, NISG, (319) 273-2494, jjobe@uni.edu

James O'Connor, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's speech and debate teams traveled across the Midwest this past weekend, adding more trophies to their collection.

On Saturday, Feb. 7, the debate team of Michelle Kelsey, a senior political communication major from Ankeny; and Eric Short, a senior general communications major from Brookings, S.D., faced their toughest competition of the year during a tournament at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. They accumulated a 3-5 record, beating teams from the University of Louisville, West Point and the University of Rochester.

Also on Saturday, UNI's individual events speech team traveled to St. Cloud University in St. Cloud, Minn. Mike Hilkin, a sophomore English education major from Dubuque, placed fourth in extemporaneous speaking and received top novice awards in extemporaneous and impromptu speaking. Danielle Dick, a senior culture and communication major from Dayton, placed fourth in after-dinner speaking.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Upward Bound Math and Science Program at the University of Northern Iowa is accepting applications for its summer residential program. Available from high school guidance counselors and principals, applications will be accepted until all openings are filled although applications postmarked by Feb. 16, 2004 will be given priority. Up to 50 students will be accepted.

Expanding on the success of the well-known Upward Bound programs on college campuses nationwide, the Upward Bound Math and Science Program at UNI encourages high school students to seek post-secondary education in math or science. ''There is a shortage of individuals going into the math and science professions, while the need for such individuals continues to increase,'' said Reygan Freeney, director of the UNI program.

Students in the program attend a free six-week summer session on the UNI campus, which includes classes, field trips and a weekly stipend.

The program has been awarded funding for 2003-2004 year by the U.S. Department of Education in the amount of $288,383. The goal of the program is to help students recognize and develop their potential to excel in math and science and encourages them to pursue post-secondary degrees in these fields.

The Upward Bound Math and Science Program has operated on the UNI campus since 1991. Freeney said about 80 percent of the program graduates have gone on to post-secondary education in math or science, and the majority of those have gone to Iowa colleges or universities.

For more information, contact a school guidance counselor, call Freeney at (319) 433-1260, or

e-mail the program at ub-math-science@uni.edu.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- University of Northern Iowa student, Juan Ahumada, took first place at the National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) District Competition in November at Luther College in Decorah.

Ahumada, a freshman vocal performance major from Sioux City, and son of Juan Ahumada Sr. and Maria L. Ramierez, was the first place winner in the Division II-A freshman men's competition.

Ahumada performed three pieces, 'Bella Siccome' from 'Don Pasquale' by Donizetti, 'A Clear Midnight' by Lee Hoiby and 'An Sylvia' by Schubert. His vocal instructor is Jean McDonald, UNI associate professor of music.

Nearly 30 students competed against Ahumada in his division.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Rod Library has named its February 'Student Assistant of the Month.' Krista Baragary, a junior majoring in elementary education, from Winthrop, is a student assistant in the Rod Library Acquisitions Department.

She has worked at Rod Library since her freshman year.

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