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News Briefs

September 14, 2003
Contact: 

Al Hays, director, Master of Public Policy program, (319) 273-2910, 266-8406, Allen.Hays@uni.edu.
Forrest Dolgener, professor of physical education, (319) 273-6479, 277-5110, Forrest.Dolgener@uni.edu.
Brian Roberts, assistant professor of history, (319) 273-3161, Brian.Robertsd@uni.edu.

On anniversary of food stamps, UNI professor lauds the program



In September 1959, Congress passed a bill authorizing food stamps for low-income Americans. The author of 'Who Speaks For the Poor,' Al Hays is director of UNI's Master of Public Policy program. He says food stamps, although often the object of contempt by middle-and upper-class America, work. 'There's an anti-poor, anti-government-program climate in this country right now, and it's become a totally irrational matter of ideology, rather than any real clear-headed analysis of what programs do or don't do. Food stamps have been effective, and they've done what they are supposed to do -- and that's reduce hunger.'

In fact, says Hays, one of the reasons food stamps have been exempt from the budget slashes experienced by other government programs is food stamps are highly effective. 'It's a fundamental safety net, not for people just sitting around home, picking up a check, but for those who are working hard every single day, and still don't earn enough to support their families.'

Contact:

Al Hays, director, Master of Public Policy program, (319) 273-2910, 266-8406, Allen.Hays@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





Marathon running good preparation for life



Marathons are 26 miles by tradition, because they are modeled after a 26-mile run by Athenian Phidippides in 490 B.C., who ran from Marathon to Sparta during the Persian Wars, seeking help in holding back the Persian army. Forrest Dolgener, professor in the UNI School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services, has run eight marathons, and understands well the draw. 'It's the challenge,' says the professor who once taught a wildly popular marathon-running course at UNI. 'The question really is, 'Can I run it?' That becomes a challenge. People do it because it's there and they haven't done it and they want to know if they can.'

Dolgener says the intense preparation -- both physical and mental -- necessary for running a marathon also is good training for life's challenges. 'People who took the marathon course have came back years afterward and told me the experience was a tremendous asset in their jobs. They learned perseverance and commitment, and how to get something done when you don't really want to do it. It's a major life lesson.'

Contact:

Forrest Dolgener, professor of physical education, (319) 273-6479, 277-5110, Forrest.Dolgener@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761





True 'free time' almost non-existent, says UNI professor

Technology has produced the likes of the cell phone, the fax and the laptop, making constant communication more convenient. Those same inventions, however, also have made it easier for today's worker to stay in touch with his work. The result, says Brian Roberts, assistant professor of history at UNI, is a nation where the distinction between work and leisure has broken down. 'It's really created a situation where, before they even know it, even if they aren't workaholics, people are working pretty much all the time. There is never a point anymore where a person can say, 'I'm outside of the workplace.''

That also increases what Roberts refers to as 'dread time' and procrastination. 'Because there's no space they can call 'outside of work,' many people, particularly those in white-collar jobs, are always thinking about what they need to finish, or thinking about getting back to work. It's hard to say you get any real free leisure time.'

Contact:

Brian Roberts, assistant professor of history, (319) 273-3161, Brian.Robertsd@uni.edu.

Gwenne Culpepper, University Marketing & Public Relations, (319) 273-2761