Mary McLeod Bethune:
AN AMERICAN PROFILE:
Pioneer in Civil Rights

by
Ashley Bixler

Timeline


1865
13th amendment is passed; slavery is abolished
July 10, 1875
Mary Jane McLeod is born to Samuel and Patsy McLeod in Maysville, South Carolina
1882
Bethune attends Trinity Presbyterian Mission School, Maysville, South Carolina
1886
Bethune graduates from Trinity at age 11 and continues to Scotia Seminary, Concord, North Carolina
1893
Bethune graduates from Scotia Seminary and continues to Moody Bible Institute, Chicago
1895
Bethune graduates from the Moody Bible Institute
1895-1903 Bethune teaches in a series of southern mission schools
1898
Bethune marries Albertus Bethune
1899
Bethune’s son, Albert McLeod Bethune is born
1904
Bethune opens Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls
1904-1942
Bethune serves as president of Bethune-Cookman College
1912
James M. Gamble of Proctor and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio financially contributes to Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls
1912
Bethune joins the Equal Suffrage League, an offshoot of the National Association of Colored Women
1914-1918
World War I
1917
Bethune becomes President of the Florida Federation of Colored Women
1920
The 19th amendment is passed, women are able to vote
1923
Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls merges with Cookman Institute of Jacksonville, Florida becoming Bethune-Cookman Collegiate Institute
1924
Bethune-Cookman Collegiate Institute becomes affiliated with the United Methodist Church
1924-1928
Bethune serves as president of the National Association of Colored Women, the highest national office a black woman can aspire at the time
1929
Stock Market crashes, beginning the Great Depression
1931
Bethune-Cookman Collegiate Institute becomes a junior college now named Bethune-Cookman College
1932
Bethune is featured in a newspaper story by a well-known journalist, Ida Tarbell, as one of the fifty greatest American women; she is number ten on the list
1935-1949
Bethune forms the National Council of Negro Women to take on the major national issues affecting blacks; she serves as president
1936-1944
Bethune serves as advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt on Minority Affairs
1936-1944
Bethune serves as director of the National Youth Administration’s Division of Negro Affairs, becoming the first black woman to serve as head of a federal agency
1940
Bethune serves as vice-president of the NAACP
1940
Bethune founds the Bethune-Volusia Beach Corporation, a recreation area and housing development
1941
Bethune-Cookman College creates a baccalaureate program for liberal arts and teacher education
Dec. 7, 1941
Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese
1942
Bethune serves as special assistant to the secretary of war and assistant director of the Women’s Army Corps
1942
Bethune retires from president of Bethune Cookman College
1945 Bethune attends conference that organizes the United Nations as a consultant on interracial understanding
1946-1947 Bethune serves as president of Bethune Cookman College
1949 Bethune receives the Haitian Medal of Honor and Merit, that country’s highest award
1949
Bethune receives an honorary Doctorate of Humanities Degree from Rollins College, the first African-American to receive an honorary degree from a white southern college
1951
Bethune serves on President Truman’s Committee of Twelve for National Defense
1952
Bethune serves as Official Delegate to the second inauguration of William V.S. Tubman as President of Liberia
May 18, 1955
Mary Jane McLeod Bethune dies at age of 79