Readings in Psychology, Fall 2012

Class Information                                                                 Instructor Information

PSYCH 6285                                                                          Dr. Helen C. Harton

Baker 315                                                                                Baker 357; 273-2235

W 12-12:50                                                                             harton@uni.edu

http://www.uni.edu/harton

                                                                                               

Office Hours: WF 11-11:50; W 2-3; by appointment

 

Readings:

You need to buy:

American Psychological Association (2009). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed). Washington, DC: Author.

Silvia, P. J. (2007). How to write a lot: A practical guide to productive academic writing. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

 

You need to copy chapters from these books:

Leong, F. T. L., & Austin, J. T. (Eds.) (2006). The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Walfish, S., & Hess, A. K. (Eds.) (2001). Succeeding in graduate school: The career guide for psychology students. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA.

Nicol, A. A. M., & Pexman, P. M. (2010). Displaying your findings: A practical guide for creating figures, posters, and presentations (6th ed). Washington, DC: APA.

Prinstein, M. J., & Patterson, M. D. (Eds.) (2003). The portable mentor: Expert guide to a successful career in psychology. New York: Kluwer Academic.

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). The psychologist’s companion: A guide to scientific writing for students and researchers (4th ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2000). Guide to publishing in psychology journals. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2006). Reviewing scientific works in psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

            Davis, S. F., Giordano, P. J., & Licht, C. A. (2009). Your career in psychology: Putting your graduate degree to work. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.

 

Other articles and websites that are available online are listed on the schedule below.

 

Course Objectives: This course deals with a variety of professional issues that are relevant for people in all areas of psychology. More specifically, the purposes of this class are to:

      1) introduce you to the psychology faculty and familiarize you with the research being conducted in the department;

2) assist you in choosing your thesis supervisor and committee;

3) facilitate your timely thesis completion;

4) provide you with information related to research at UNI (e.g., library resources, human participants procedures); and

5) foster your professional development; and

 

Course Description:

 

A lot of the stuff in this class are things that are often taught informally, and you’ll undoubtedly learn more about many of these topics from your thesis supervisor and others. Some of them you may have even talked about as an undergraduate, whereas others you should have been taught as an undergraduate but weren’t. Other elements you may not feel like you really need at this point. The idea behind the class is to take this information that some people get and others don’t, and that comes at odd times and piecemeal, and put it together to make sure that everyone gets at least basic information on topics that are relevant for your thesis and for your development as a psychologist early on in graduate school. If there are things that you think don’t apply to you yet, then make notes and come back to those things when it is applicable. It’s always easier to say “I’ll pick it up as I go along” than it is to actually do that. We want to make sure you get off on the right foot and stay there. The class is also a time when you can ask questions about the thesis, classes, careers, whatever.

 

Your responsibilities: You are responsible for attending all sessions, reading the assigned books, websites, and articles, and completing assignments described during class or on the syllabus. You should also meet with at least three faculty members whose research interests you. These faculty members can be any graduate faculty in the department; they do not have to be within your “area.” In these meetings, you should discuss your research interests and those of the faculty member. The faculty member will also suggest to you 2-3 articles or other readings relevant to his/her research. By the end of October, you should let me know who you have chosen as your thesis supervisor (and make sure he/she has agreed to supervise you).

 

Individual portion: Beginning by at least the first week of November, you should also meet regularly (approximately weekly) with your thesis supervisor. During these meetings you will discuss articles that you have read relevant to your thesis topic and begin to develop your idea and topic more fully.

 

Grading: Your grade will be determined by attendance, participation, and completion of various assignments (detailed below).

 

Completion of Human Participants Training

required to get a grade in class

Honors pledge

required to get a grade in class

Informed participation                                   

15%

2 article summaries

10%

Article review

15%

IRB form

10%

APA presentation

10%

APA test

5%

Timeline and writing plan

 2.5%

CV/Resume

10%

Integrative review

20%

Conference information

 2.5%

 

 

Academic Honesty Policy: Cheating and plagiarism of any kind or amount will not be tolerated and will result in a 0 on the assignment in question, regardless of intentions. Ignorance of the rules is no excuse. If you have any questions about what is acceptable, ask.

 

Tentative Course Schedule:

 

 

Date

Topic

Assignment/Class content

8/22

Time management panel

Read Suggestions from previous students

Read More suggestions

Panel discussion of managing time in graduate school

Honor agreement due.

 

8/29

Library Presentation—Room 286 of Rod Library

 

Read Chapter 3, Bibliographic research, in Leong & Austin

9/5

Writing about research; Plagiarism; Faculty presentations

Read Sample article summaries

Read Comments on summaries from previous classes

Read How to read a psychology article

Choose research/APA, and do exercises 2-1 through 2-4 (print out and bring in scores).

9/12

Faculty Presentations

1 article summary due.

 

9/19

Faculty Presentations

 

 

9/26

Faculty Presentations

1 article summary due.

 

10/3

Choosing an Advisor; PhD program prep; Program of Study

Read Chapter 7 (pp. 85-89), The politics of graduate programs, and Chapter 8, Students and faculty: The growth of relationships, in Walfish & Hess

Bring your program of study to class (print it out from MyUNIverse)

Discussion of “how to get along” (how to figure out what your thesis supervisor really wants and how to keep him/her happy).

Discussion of what you need to be doing if PhD programs vs. jobs are in your future

 

10/10

Research and the IRB

Read IRB information online (choose Human Participants—IRB on left) and review forms.

Get your IRB training. You can do this online program or go to the in-person training session on Monday, October 1 from 2-4 in the University Room, Maucker Union.

HP training certificate due.

 

10/17

Integrative writing and what goes where

Read Sternberg’s tips

Read Bem’s article on how to write an empirical article

Read Bem’s article on how to write a review article

Read Chapter 14, Article writing 101 in Sternberg, 2000

Read Chapter 1, 8 common misconceptions about psychology papers, in Sternberg, 2003

Completed IRB form due

10/24

Writing part 2; Reviewing and accepting reviews

Bring in your second article summary with your own comments on it based on what we read and talked about last week.

Read Chapter 1, Reviewing empirical submission to journals, in Sternberg, 2006

Read Chapter 4, Reviewing and evaluating a research article, in Leong & Austin

Read Chapter 12, Reading reviews, suffering rejection, and advocating for your paper in Sternberg, 2000

Should have met with 3 faculty by now. Turn in list of faculty and thesis supervisor by October 26

10/31

Writing and doing it a lot;

Read How to write a lot.

Discuss plans.

Writing exercise.

Thought paper on writing hinderances due.

 

11/7

Vitas and resumes

Bring in a rough draft of your CV/resume

11/14

Presentations and conferences

Read Chapters 13 and 14, Posters and Visuals for presentations, in Nicol & Pexman.

Read Chapter 6, Presenting your research, in Prinstein & Patterson.

Discussion of formal presentation do’s and don’ts.

CV/resume due.

Conference paper due.

11/28

APA presentations

Article review due.

12/5

APA presentation

 

12/10

1:00-2:50

APA style;

Thesis process and Professionalism and careers

APA style test

2nd year panel

Discuss thesis options beyond empirical studies with college students (internet surveys, meta-analyses, existing data, computer simulation)

Discuss personal presentation (e.g., clothes, appearance) and questions to ask in interviews.

Integrative review paper due. (short section that might be part of thesis—about 2-3 pages, but several articles, in APA style, with references)

 

 

Reading list (books that address issues that are of interest to psych graduate students):

 

 

General/Covers Many Topics

Buskist, W., & Burke, C. (2007). Preparing for graduate school in psychology: 101 questions and answers (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

Darley, J. M., Zanna, M. P., & Roediger, H. L., III (2004). The compleat academic: A career guide (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

 

Johnson, W. B., & Huwe, J. M. (2002). Getting mentored in graduate school. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Kuther, T. L. (2008). Surviving graduate school in psychology: A pocket mentor. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Prinstein, M. J., & Patterson, M. D. (2003). The portable mentor: Expert guide to a successful career in psychology. New York: Kluwer Academic.

 

Walfish, S., & Hess, A. K. (Eds.) (2001). Succeeding in graduate school: The career guide for psychology students. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA.

 

 

 

Presentations and Writing

 

Cone, J. D., & Foster, S. L. (2006). Dissertations and theses from start to finish: Psychology and related fields (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

 

Kendall-Tacket, K. A. (2007). How to write for a general audience: A guide for academics who want to share their knowledge with the world and have fun doing it. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Mitchell, M. L., Jolley, J. M., & O’Shea, R. P. (2004). Writing for psychology. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

 

Nicol, A. A. M., & Pexman, P. M. (1999). Presenting your findings: A practical guide for creating tables. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Nicol, A. A. M., & Pexman, P. M. (2010). Displaying your findings: A practical guide for creating figures, posters, and presentations (6th ed). Washington, DC: APA.

 

Smyth, T. R. (2008). The psychology thesis: Research and coursework. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

 

Sternberg, R. J. (2003). The psychologist’s companion: A guide to scientific writing for students and researchers (4th ed.). New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2000). Guide to publishing in psychology journals. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Sternberg, R. J. (Ed.) (2006). Reviewing scientific works in psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

 

Strunk, W., Jr. (1999). The elements of style. New York: Bartleby.com.

 

 

Careers

 

Davis, S. F., Giordano, P. J., & Licht, C. A. (2009). Your career in psychology: Putting your graduate degree to work. Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell.

 

Keller, P. A. (1994). Academic paths: Career decisions and experiences of psychologists. Hillsdale, NJ: LEA.

 

Kuther, T. L. (2005). Your career in psychology: Industrial/organizational psychology. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. There are also versions for Clinical and counseling psychology, Health and sport psychology, and Psychology and law.

 

Kuther, T. L., & Morgan, R. D. (2007). Careers in psychology: Opportunities in a changing world (2nd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning.

 

Morgan, R. D., Kuther, T. L., & Habben, C. J. (Eds.). (2005). Life after graduate school in psychology: Insider's advice from new psychologists. New York: Psychology Press.

 

Oster, G. D. (2006). Life as a psychologist: Career choices and insights. Westport, CT: Praeger.

 

 

Methods and Statistics

 

Barak, A. (Ed.) (2008). Psychological aspects of cyberspace: Theory, research, applications. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Best, S. J., & Krueger, B. S. (2004). Internet data collection. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Birnbaum, M. H. (Ed.) (2000). Psychological experiments on the internet. San Diego: Academic Press.

 

Fowler, F. J., Jr. (1995). Improving survey questions: Design and evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Grimm, L. G., & Yarnold, P. R. (1995). Reading and understanding multivariate statistics. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Grimm, L. G., & Yarnold, P. R. (2000). Reading and understanding more multivariate statistics. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (2004). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Kline, R. B. (2004). Beyond significance testing: Reforming data analysis methods in behavioral research. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Leong, F. T. L., & Austin, J. T. (Eds.) (1996). The psychology research handbook: A guide for graduate students and research assistants. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Lipsey, M. W., & Wilson, D. B. (2001). Practical meta-analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Morgan, S. E., Reichert, T., & Harrison, T. R. (2002). From numbers to words: Reporting statistical results for the social sciences. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

 

Newton, R. R., & Rudestam, K. E. (1999). Your statistical consultant: Answers to your data analysis questions. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Reis, H. T., & Judd, C. M. (Eds.) (2000). Handbook of research methods in social and personality psychology. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Sage little green stats books (great little books on every statistic and methodology you can think of)

 

Snyder, L. B., Hayes, A. F., & Slater, M. D. (Eds.) (2008). The Sage sourcebook of advanced data analysis methods for communication research.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Eyde, L. D., Robertson, G. J. & Krug, S. E. (2009). Responsible test use: Case studies for assessing human behavior (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

 

 

Teaching

 

Benjamin, L, T., Jr. (2008). Favorite activities for the teaching of psychology. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Buskist, W., & Davis, S. F. (2006). Handbook for the teaching of psychology. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

 

Forsyth, D. R. (2002). The  professor’s guide to teaching: Psychological principles and practices. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Goss Lucas, S., & Bernstein, D. A. (2005). Teaching psychology: A step by step guide. Mahwah, NJ: LEA.

 

McKeachie, W. J., & Svinicki, M. (2005). McKeachie's teaching tips: Strategies, research and theory for college and university teachers (12th ed.). New York: Houghton Mifflin.

 

Sternberg, R. J. (1997). Teaching introductory psychology: Survival tips from the experts. Washington, DC: APA.

 

Ware, M. E., & Johnson, D. E. (Eds.) (2000). Handbook of demonstrations and activities in the teaching of psychology, Volume 3 (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: LEA. (Four volumes all together)