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Classic Teaching Resources

This page includes tried-and-true teaching resources that have been throughly tested and vetted by our core members of the GAI.  These are our favorite resources and we hope that you will find them as exciting and useful as we do.

--Free Rice--

http://freerice.com/#/english-vocabulary/1392

Feed hungry people (really!) while learning geography. Learn English vocabulary or look for "GEOGRAPHY" in the Subjects tab.  Review locations of countries, world capitals, world landmarks and flags of the world. This is a non-profit website that supports the United Nations World Food Programme.  Submitted by Kathy Sundstedt (Dike-New Hartford S.D.)

--Coverdell WorldWise School (Peace Corps)--

http://www.peacecorps.gov/wws/

World Wise Schools resources make it easy to integrate global issues and cultural awareness into the core content areas.  This webstie enriches K–12 students with the dynamic cross-cultural classroom materials, literature, videos, lessons, ideas, and services provided free.  Submitted by Anne Hoeper (Davenport S.D.)

--New York Times UPFRONT News Magazine--

http://teacher.scholastic.com

This is one of the greatest resources in any social science teacher’s “tool box” of classroom resources.  It has exceptionally well-written articles on all facets of currents events and major historical topics.  The articles in this magazine are a perfect way to introduce a current event and give students the background knowledge necessary to understand a topic.  The articles are usually 2-3 pages in length, are composed of a reading level commensurate with the average high school student, have great pictures, include excellent maps and provide students with a basic overview of any given topic.  While a subscription is certainly worth the money the web site has a data base of all the articles written and is very easy to navigate.  You do not need to purchase the magazine in order to access past issues and make copies for classroom use. Submitted by Kimn Hassenfritz (Mt. Pleasant S.D.)

--US Historical Census Data--

http://fisher.lib.virginia.edu/census/

To get population data prior to 1960, go to this site!  It is interesting to see how the topics have varied since 1790, the year of our first US census.  If students gather their own data and map it, it makes it much more "real" to see that in 1860, Iowa had "X" number of people living here, and then to see the distribution by county too!  A click of a mouse maps the data for the student, so comparisons & inferences can be made quickly and easily.  Submitted by Marcia Hummel (Iowa Central C.C.)