October 3, 2014
Department of Communication Studies
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614

 

Introduction
Summary
Events
Speakers
Parking Locations
Registration Form
Scholarships
Sponsors
Home

 

 

 

Workshop Summary

  1. Be a Reporter, Not a Describer!
    Creating Advertising That Actually Gets Noticed
    Creative Visual Storytelling
    Cross Cultural Filmmaking
    Current Issues in News Reporting
    Freelancing: How to Make a Living in the TV/Film Industry without Having a Job
    Holding It Together: The Role of a News Producer
    Integrated News Reporting
    Live Sports Productions
    Making Creative Decisions – How Did You Do?
    Media Management Issues
    News Directors: An Insider’s View of the Newsroom
    Post Production: Where We Are Today and Where We’re Going Tomorrow

    Selling the Power and Value of Your Communications Degree in the Real World
    Social Marketing: What it’s Like to Tweet for a Living
    Stand-Out Resumes
    Who Really Decides?

# Be a Reporter, Not a Describer!
Anyone can be a describer, but a TRUE reporter knows how to cultivate sources and come in with story ideas every day. These days, the better TV stations are demanding that reporters and anchors be true reporters. How do you do that? This session offers ideas on how to be a reporter versus a describer and what the difference is between the two.   TOP

# Creating Advertising That Actually Gets Noticed
In our age of information overload, we are bombarded with as many as 20,000 unique advertising messages every single day. So what does it take to make a memorable ad? In this session, we will discuss life and challenges in the world of the advertising agency: who thrives in what careers, why successful marketing strategies are so much more than just ads, and where advertising is heading in the digital age. Participants will have the opportunity to create elements of an ad that will later be reviewed and critiqued by local industry experts.   TOP

# Creative Visual Storytelling
Learn how to be a visual storyteller with this session featuring many examples of TV stories from around the country. You should walk away with a list of ideas on how to tell better stories for television.    TOP

# Cross Cultural Filmmaking
Interested in making films in other countries? Would you like to work as part of an international film team? What do you pack for a “backpack” filmmaking adventure? Learn the dos and don’ts of (cultural awareness) the ins and outs (passports/visas/customs) and have an adventure of a lifetime creating media that matters. Discover how can you do this on your own and how can this be implemented into the academic experience.   TOP

# Current Issues in News Reporting
Dave Busiek (KCCI-TV), Shane Moreland (KWWL-TV), Rod Peterson (WHO-TV), and Mike Wagner (KCRG-TV) examine issues that influence the construction and delivery of news content (drones, WikiLeaks, privacy, etc.).   TOP

# Freelancing: How to Make a Living in the TV/Film Industry without Having a Job
This workshop will examine the ins and outs of freelance production work. Special attention is given to the booking process, how to cultivate and keep clients, procurement procedures, taxes and benefits.   TOP

# Holding It Together: The Role of a News Producer
If someone asked you to explain what goes on inside a newsroom, could you? You might have an idea of what reporters and photographers do in their daily routine, but what about producers? This workshop will explain the job and the many opportunities for quick career advancement. Even if you aren’t planning on becoming a producer, if you plan to work in a newsroom, you’ll want the scoop on the people who hold everything together.   TOP

# Integrated News Reporting
The newsroom is constantly evolving. Learn about the opportunities and challenges that may arise when covering a story for multiple platforms.   TOP

# Live Sports Productions
Cedar Falls-based production company (ATCP, Inc.) has been responsible for producing hundreds of sports productions for a variety of sporting events over the past decade. Clients include: University of Northern Iowa Athletic Department (Football, Men’s and Women’s Basketball, Wrestling, Swimming and Diving, Track and Field, and Volleyball), Upper Iowa University (Football), and a number of different high school sporting events for KCRG-TV. This session will focus on everything that goes into a live sports production (director, producer, instant replay, graphics, camera operation responsibilities, and announcers). Learn about the many challenges and the fun that goes into producing a live sporting event and a weekly sports TV show.   TOP

# Making Creative Decisions – How Did You Do?
Are you gracious enough to accept compliments? Can you handle constructive criticism? Let’s review your editing skills – just you, me and another student. Whether it’s a 30-second commercial, a five-minute YouTube video or a half-hour training video, bring in your sample. Together we’ll discuss your original goal, your techniques in editing and your final product. Editing is all about making creative decisions. This one-on-one is not to teach you how to edit, but how to make better decisions. Got something to show? – Bring it! Limited to two students per ½ hr. session.   TOP

# Media Management Issues
Electronic media is changing. New technologies bring new challenges and huge opportunities to traditional radio and television stations in Iowa. Find out how broadcasters big and small are managing the changes, finding new talent, increasing their profitability and serving their communities. Our panelists represent small, medium and large media properties and both local and corporate ownership. They will share how the new landscape of media management is changing, and how you fit in the picture.   TOP

# News Directors: An Insider’s View of the Newsroom
Dave Busiek (KCCI-TV), Shane Moreland (KWWL-TV), Rod Peterson (WHO-TV), and Mike Wagner (KCRG-TV) examine the ins and outs of TV newsrooms. Find out what goes on behind the scenes and gain a better understanding of what it takes to be successful in broadcast news.   TOP

# Post Production: Where We Are Today and Where We’re Going Tomorrow
Award winning video editor/producer Don Fish will examine current post-production platforms and techniques and the industry’s movement toward shared media systems. He will look at technology and programs from a storyteller’s and engineer’s point of view.   TOP

# Selling the Power and Value of Your Communications Degree in the Real World
Two former broadcasters share how they apply their broadcasting and communication skills in their careers. If you’re wondering how to make your communications degree work for you and how to position yourself with employers, this session is for you. Hear how your communications degree and/or broadcast experience can be extremely valuable in the corporate world.   TOP

# Social Marketing: What it’s Like to Tweet for a Living
Come hear what it’s like to brainstorm, develop, execute, and report on social marketing campaigns. You’ll get walked through the advertising agency process for running a social promotion with McDonald’s and the Kansas City Chiefs as well as the re-launch of Hostess Cakes. There’s a lot more to social marketing than tweets and Facebook posts. This workshop will show you what happens before and after you see a post from your favorite brand.   TOP

# Stand-Out Resumes
Industry recruitment specialist Teresa Hein has viewed hundreds of resumes for TV hopefuls. The world of broadcast reporting is competitive, so it’s important that your resume reel shows off your skills. Learn how to produce a resume portfolio that is relevant and stands out from the rest. The workshop is aimed at entry-level journalists who want on-camera experience.   TOP

# Who Really Decides?
You may have heard the phrase “we report, you decide.” But who makes the decision what is news and how much coverage it gets? Join in a discussion about why certain stories make the cut and others are simply cut from the broadcast. Learn how lifestyles have affected the way news is presented and what influence social media has had in the past five years. And what may a newscast look or sound like in the future?   TOP

Thanks Sponsor