Transition Time

Video: 

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Lining up from group time incorporates clothing awareness and number recognition.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Essential Characteristics

2.A.07— Ms. Romig has developed a daily schedule that is predictable yet flexible… The schedule provides time and support for transitions, includes both indoor and outdoor experiences, and is responsive to a child’s need to rest or be active.

The children in Ms. Romig’s class have just completed their morning group time, a daily routine for the children, and are preparing to transition to gross motor play. Ms. Romig recognizes the need for the children in her class to have a daily whole group experience that encompasses many learning opportunities and familiar routines for the children followed by an orderly transition to a more active time for large motor play and exercise.

Curriculum Content Area for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.02— The children in Ms. Romig’s class are provided varied opportunities…to build understanding of numbers, number names, and their relationship to… symbols.

As the children line up at the door to go to the gym, each child stands on a number on the floor. The line leader knows to stand on 1. Ms. Romig directs the caboose’s attention to the 18 written on the board and asks him to find that number on the floor (“…a 1 and an 8, 18.”) since there are only eighteen children in school that day.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.A.05— The teachers in Ms. Romig’s class work to prevent challenging or disruptive behaviors through…environmental design and…effective transitions.

 Ms. Romig uses a clear transition strategy by asking the children to line up if they wore a particular article of winter clothing to school that day. This allows several children to line up at once without all children getting up at the same time but also without creating too much wait time at the door. Ms. Romig also considers the environmental design of her classroom by placing numbers on the floor for the children to stand on so that the line does not become too crowded with the children standing too close together.

IELS

IELS: 

9.2-Self-Regulation

Children show increasing ability to regulate their behavior and express their emotions in appropriate ways.

Children in Ms. Romig's class show increasing capacity to monitor their own behavior, by following and contributing to classroom procedures and managing transitions....

Ms. Romig's classroom has a series of numbers on the floor for lining up at the door. She directs the child who is the line leader to the first number and the child who is the "caboose" to number 18 (the number of children in class). She offers a series of common winter clothing options to encourage the children to line up in an orderly fashion. She begins by saying, "If you wore snow boots to school, you may line up." She continues the series by calling for children who wore mittens, hats and finally coats.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Essential Characteristics

2.7- Ms. Romig has developed a daily schedule that is predictable yet flexible... The schedule provides time and support for transitions, includes both indoor and outdoor experiences, and is responsive to a child's need to rest or be active.

The children in Ms. Romig's class have just completed their morning group time, a daily routine for the children, and are preparing to transition to gross motor play. Ms. Romig recognizes the need for the children in her class to have a daily whole group experience that encompasses many learning opportunities and familiar routines for the children followed by an orderly transition to a more active time for large motor play and exercise.

Curriculum Content Area for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.23- The children in Ms. Romig's class are provided varied opportunities...to build understanding of numbers, number names, and their relationship to... symbols.

As the children line up at the door to go to the gym, each child stands on a number on the floor. The line leader knows to stand on 1. Ms. Romig directs the caboose's attention to the 18 written on the board and asks him to find that number on the floor ("...a 1 and an 8, 18.") since there are only eighteen children in school that day.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.2- The teachers in Ms. Romig's class work to prevent challenging or disruptive behaviors through...environmental design and...effective transitions.

 Ms. Romig uses a clear transition strategy by asking the children to line up if they wore a particular article of winter clothing to school that day. This allows several children to line up at once without all children getting up at the same time but also without creating too much wait time at the door. Ms. Romig also considers the environmental design of her classroom by placing numbers on the floor for the children to stand on so that the line does not become too crowded with the children standing too close together.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(c) - Ms. Romig is encouraging self-control by setting clear, consistent limits, and having realistic expectations.

Ms. Romig's classroom has a series of numbers on the floor for lining up at the door. She directs the child who is the line leader to the first number and the child who is the "caboose" to number 18 (the number of children in class). She offers a series of common winter clothing options to encourage the children to line up in an orderly fashion. She begins by saying, "If you wore snow boots to school, you may line up." She continues the series by calling for children who wore mittens, hats and finally coats.

1304.21(a)(3)(ii) - Ms. Romig has planned for routines and transitions so that they occur in a timely, predictable and unrushed manner according to each child’s needs.

Ms. Romig uses a clear transition strategy by asking the children to line up if they wore a particular article of winter clothing to school that day. This allows several children to line up at once without all children getting up at the same time but also without creating too much wait time at the door. Ms. Romig also considers the environmental design of her classroom by placing numbers on the floor for the children to stand on so that the line does not become too crowded with the children standing too close together.