Three Beds and Four People

Video: 

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Math and fairness present problem solving opportunities.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.02- Children are provided varied opportunities and materials to build understanding of numbers...and their relationship to object quantities.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses the children's block structures to pose a problem about quantity for a girl to think about. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson counts four people in the block center and only three beds. The girl finds a fourth block structure that can be used only to discover that another child has come to the center so there is still one more person than there are beds.

Responding to Children's Interests and Needs

3.E.04- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of children's... interests and ideas... to tailor learning opportunities for groups and individuals.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson capitalizes on an opportunity to use the children's interest in pretend play by creating a room with beds made from blocks to see if one girl can figure out a way to make sure that there is one bed for each person in the center.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.07- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of content to...ask questions that stimulate children's thinking.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson takes advantage of an opportunity to integrate math problem solving with the concept of fairness. She points out that there are three beds the children have created in the block center and four people. A girl notices another bed that could be used. When Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks her to count the number of beds, the girl counts four, and when she counts people, she discovers that another child has joined the group so there is still one bed less than the number of people in the center.

IELS

IELS: 

8.3-Problem Solving

Children demonstrate strategies for reasoning and problem solving.

Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class show interest in and find...solutions to...problems.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson talks with some children playing with block structures. She points out that there are only three beds made from blocks and four people playing in the block center. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson poses the question, "What are we going to do?". A girl responds, "I think YOU should make another sleep for you!" Another girl points out a block structure behind Ms. Nitchais-Reierson and she asks the girl she is talking to "Is that another bed?". When the girl confirms that it is, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks, "So now how many do we have?" and encourages the girl to count beds and people again. She counts the four beds and when she counts the people in the center, she discovers that another girl has come to play. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson points out that with four beds and five people, there still are not enough beds for everyone.

9.3-Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class interact comfortably with...familiar caregivers.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson talks with one of the girls in her class. The girl answers Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's questions without hesitation and is willing to give her opinion about what they should do when they discover a difference in the number of beds and people in the block center. Another girl in the block center directs Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's attention to another bed built from blocks that may solve the problem they have.

11.1-Comparison and Number

Children understand amount, including use of numbers and counting.

A girl in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class...counts objects, matching numbers one-to-one with objects.

When Ms. Nitchais-Reierson discovers that children have constructed only three beds in the block center and there are four people playing there, she asks a girl what they should do about it. When another bed is discovered, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks the girl to count the number of beds. When the girl determines there are four beds, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks her to count how many people are in the block center. The girl finds that since one more child has joined the group, there are now five people with only four beds.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.23- Children are provided varied opportunities and materials to build understanding of numbers...and their relationship to object quantities.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses the children's block structures to pose a problem about quantity for a girl to think about. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson counts four people in the block center and only three beds. The girl finds a fourth block structure that can be used only to discover that another child has come to the center so there is still one more person than there are beds.

Responding to Children's Interests and Needs

3.12- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of children's... interests and ideas... to tailor learning opportunities for groups and individuals.

 Ms. Nitchais-Reierson capitalizes on an opportunity to use the children's interest in pretend play by creating a room with beds made from blocks to see if one girl can figure out a way to make sure that there is one bed for each person in the center.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.17- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of content to...ask questions that stimulate children's thinking.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson takes advantage of an opportunity to integrate math problem solving with the concept of fairness. She points out that there are three beds the children have created in the block center and four people. A girl notices another bed that could be used. When Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks her to count the number of beds, the girl counts four, and when she counts people, she discovers that another child has joined the group so there is still one bed less than the number of people in the center.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(4)(iv) -  Ms. Nitchais-Reierson supports emerging…numeracy development through materials and activities according to the developmental level of each child.

When Ms. Nitchais-Reierson discovers that children have constructed only three beds in the block center and there are four people playing there, she asks a girl what they should do about it. When another bed is discovered, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks the girl to count the number of beds. When the girl determines there are four beds, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks her to count how many people are in the block center. The girl finds that since one more child has joined the group, there are now five people with only four beds.

1304.21(c)(1)(ii) - Provides for the development of cognitive skills by encouraging each child to organize his or her experiences, to understand concepts, and to develop age appropriate…numeracy, reasoning, problem solving…skills which form a foundation for school readiness and later school success.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson talks with some children playing with block structures. She points out that there are only three beds made from blocks and four people playing in the block center. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson poses the question, "What are we going to do?". A girl responds, "I think YOU should make another sleep for you!" Another girl points out a block structure behind Ms. Nitchais-Reierson and she asks the girl she is talking to "Is that another bed?". When the girl confirms that it is, Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks, "So now how many do we have?" and encourages the girl to count beds and people again. She counts the four beds and when she counts the people in the center, she discovers that another girl has come to play. Ms. Nitchais-Reierson points out that with four beds and five people, there still are not enough beds for everyone.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

 

  • Demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

 

 

Mathematics

Number and Operations

  • Demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quality.
  • Begins to make use of one to one correspondences in counting objects and matching groups of objects.
  • Begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.
  • Develops increased abilities to combine, separate and name “how many” concrete objects.

 

Science

Scientific Skills and Methods

  • Develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Self Control

  • Demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully.

Cooperation

 

  • Increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing and discussion.
  • Develops increasing abilities to give and take in interactions; to take turns in games or using materials; and to interact without being overly submissive or directive.

 

Social Relationships

 

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

 

Approaches to Learning

Engagement and Persistence

  • Demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

Reasoning and Problem Solving

  • Develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task or problem.
  • Grows in recognizing and solving problems through active exploration, including trial and error, and interaction and discussions with peers and adults
  • Develops increasing abilities to classify, compare and contrast objects, events and experiences

 

Physical Health and Development

Gross Motor

  • Shows increasing levels of proficiency, control and balance in walking, climbing, running, jumping, hopping, skipping, marching and galloping.