Signing In

Video: 

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Name recognition and writing skills emerge during a morning routine.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Areas of Development: Physical Development

2.C.03- Children are provided varied opportunities and materials that support fine-motor development.

Children in Ms. Hand's class are presented with the opportunity to write their names as part of a routine each morning.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.03- Children have opportunities to become familiar with print. They are actively involved in making sense of print, and they have opportunities to become familiar with, recognize, and use print that is accessible throughout the classroom.

During the signing in process, Dakota finds his name amongst his friends' names on a board located near the door as he enters the classroom. He then writes his name on a sign-in sheet as part of a daily routine.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.05- In Ms. Gillette's class children have multiple and varied opportunities to write...children are given the support they need to write on their own... including access to the alphabet and to printed words...on laminated cards.

Ms. Gillette makes laminated name cards available to the children in her class so they can practice writing their names. For some children, a dashed line version of their name helps them form the letters. Other children write their names without the support of the dashed lines.

IELS

IELS: 

7.4-Fine Motor Development

Children develop fine motor skills.

Children in Ms. Gillette's class show increased skills in using... writing tools for various learning activities.

As part of the writing center, children in Ms. Gillette's class have the opportunity to write their names with dry erase markers. They write their names on laminated cards with lines to guide them in the size of their letters.

10.2-Early Literacy

Children engage in early reading experiences.

Dakota identifies some alphabet letters by their shapes, especially those in his own name and recognizes the printed form of his name in a variety of contexts.

As part of a morning routine, children in Ms. Hand's class find their name on a pegboard and place the name card in a basket. Then the children sign their names in the designated location. Initially Dakota reaches for a name that is on the same color of card as his name, but he realizes that the name on the card is not his. He finds his name, and signs in.

10.3-Early Writing

Children engage in early writing experiences.

Children attempt to communicate with others using...letters to write.

Dakota signs his name as he comes to school. The "D" in his name is reversed and some of the letters are out of order, but he writes all the letters in his name. Two girls in Ms. Gillette's class write their names on laminated name cards with dry erase markers.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Areas of Development: Physical Development

2.13- Children are provided varied opportunities and materials that support fine-motor development.

Children in Ms. Hand's class are presented with the opportunity to write their names as part of a routine each morning.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.19- Children have opportunities to become familiar with print. They are actively involved in making sense of print, and they have opportunities to become familiar with, recognize, and use print that is accessible throughout the classroom.

During the signing in process, Dakota finds his name amongst his friends' names on a board located near the door as he enters the classroom. He then writes his name on a sign-in sheet as part of a daily routine.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.21- In Ms. Gillette's class children have multiple and varied opportunities to write...children are given the support they need to write on their own... including access to the alphabet and to printed words...on laminated cards.

Ms. Gillette makes laminated name cards available to the children in her class so they can practice writing their names. For some children, a dashed line version of their name helps them form the letters. Other children write their names without the support of the dashed lines.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(3)(ii) – Ms. Hand plans for routines and transitions so that they occur in a timely, predictable and unrushed manner according to each child's needs.

As part of a morning routine, children in Ms. Hand's class find their name on a pegboard and place the name card in a basket. Then the children sign their names in the designated location.

1304.21(a)(5)(ii) – Ms. Gillette provides appropriate time, space, equipment, materials and adult guidance for the development of fine motor skills according to each child’s developmental level.

Ms. Gillette makes laminated name cards available to the children in her class so they can practice writing their names. For some children, a dashed line version of their name helps them form the letters. Other children write their names without the support of the dashed lines.

 

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Literacy

Print Awareness and Concepts

  • Shows increasing awareness of print in classroom, home and community settings.
  • Develops growing understanding of the different functions of forms of print such as signs, letters, newspapers, lists, messages, and memos
  • Demonstrates increasing awareness of concepts of print, such as that reading in English moves from top to bottom and from left to right, that speech can be written down, and that print conveys a message.
  • Shows progress in recognizing the association between spoken and written words by following print as it is read aloud.

Early Writing

  • Develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.
  • Experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.
  • Progress from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

Alphabet Knowledge

  • Shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.
  • Increases in ability to notice the beginning letters in familiar words.
  • Knows that letters of the alphabet are a special category of visual graphics that can be individually named.

 

Physical Health and Development

Fine Motor Skills

  • Grows in hand eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads and using scissors.
  • Progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing and art tools including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes and various types of technology.