Sand Exploration

Video: 

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Properties of matter are explored at the sand table.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Science

2.G.02- Children in Ms. Christner's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to learn key concepts and principles of science such as...structure and property of matter.

The girls at the sand table play with dry sand. They want to use molds to make different shapes in the sand, but the dry sand will not mold well. The girls ask an associate for help. The associate helps the girls add water to the dry sand and then asks them if the molds work with the wet sand. The girls have the opportunity to explore the differences in the properties of dry sand versus wet sand.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Science

2.G.06- Two girls in Ms. Christner's class...are provided varied opportunities and materials that encourage them to think, question, and reason about observed and inferred phenomenon.

The girls at the sand table want to use molds to shape the sand. When the dry sand will not stick together in a molded shape, a classroom associate suggests adding water to see if the molds work with wet sand. The girls have the opportunity to explore how adding water to the sand makes it more moldable than the dry sand.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.A.04- Ms. Christner organizes space and selects materials...to stimulate exploration, experimentation, discovery, and conceptual learning.

The sand table provides many opportunities for children to explore the natural earth and develop concepts about the properties of matter (differences between how wet sand and dry sand react to being molded into shapes). The shovels and molds provided with the sand table align with age appropriate preferred activities such as scooping and dumping.

IELS

IELS: 

7.2-Play and Senses

Children engage in play to learn.

Children in Ms. Christner's class use sights...and...textures to... explore and experience...materials. 

The girls playing at the sand table notice the difference in the way the wet sand and the dry sand looks. The classroom associate encourages them to feel the difference between the wet sand and the dry sand.

7.4-Fine Motor Development

Children develop fine motor skills.

Two girls in Ms. Christner's class use hand-eye coordination to perform...fine-motor tasks with a variety of manipulative materials.

The girls playing at the sand table use a variety of fine motor skills during their play. They dump water from a cup into the sand table, use a shovel and hands to scoop sand into molds and then dump the sand out. They also use the molds to form different shapes with the wet sand.

9.3-Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

Girls in Ms. Christner's class accept guidance...and directions from a range of familiar caregivers...and...show trust in familiar caregivers.

Girls playing at the sand table have trouble getting the sand molds to work. A classroom associate suggests making some of the sand wet to see if the mold will work. The girls let the associate help them pour the water on the sand and later do some of the pouring independently. The girls trust the advice of the associate and continue playing after the associate leaves.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Science

2.27- Children in Ms. Christner's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to learn key concepts and principles of science such as...structure and property of matter.

The girls at the sand table play with dry sand. They want to use molds to make different shapes in the sand, but the dry sand will not mold well. The girls ask an associate for help. The associate helps the girls add water to the dry sand and then asks them if the molds work with the wet sand. The girls have the opportunity to explore the differences in the properties of dry sand versus wet sand.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Science

2.28- Two girls in Ms. Christner's class...are provided varied opportunities and materials that encourage them to think, question, and reason about observed and inferred phenomenon.

The girls at the sand table want to use molds to shape the sand. When the dry sand will not stick together in a molded shape, a classroom associate suggests adding water to see if the molds work with wet sand. The girls have the opportunity to explore how adding water to the sand makes it more moldable than the dry sand.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.1- Ms. Christner organizes space and selects materials...to stimulate exploration, experimentation, discovery, and conceptual learning.

The sand table provides many opportunities for children to explore the natural earth and develop concepts about the properties of matter (differences between how wet sand and dry sand react to being molded into shapes). The shovels and molds provided with the sand table align with age appropriate preferred activities such as scooping and dumping.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(4)(i) – Ms. Christner creates a classroom environment that supports each child's learning using various strategies including experimentation, inquiry, observation, play and exploration.

The girls at the sand table play with dry sand. They want to use molds to make different shapes in the sand, but the dry sand will not mold well. The girls ask an associate for help. The associate helps the girls add water to the dry sand and then asks them if the molds work with the wet sand. The girls have the opportunity to explore the differences in the properties of dry sand versus wet sand.

1304.21(a)(5)(ii) – Ms Christner creates a classroom environment that promotes each child’s physical development by providing appropriate time, space, equipment, materials and adult guidance for the development of fine motor skills according to each child's developmental level.

The girls playing at the sand table use a variety of fine motor skills during their play. They dump water from a cup into the sand table, use a shovel and hands to scoop sand into molds and then dump the sand out. They also use the molds to form different shapes with the wet sand.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

  • Shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.

Speaking and Communicating

  • Develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions, and for other varied purposes

 

Science

Scientific Skills and Methods

  • Begins to use senses and a variety of tools and simple measuring devices to gather information, investigate materials and observe processes and relationships.
  • Develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.
  • Begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions and form generalizations.

Scientific Knowledge

 

  • Shows increased awareness and beginning understanding of changes in materials and cause-effect relationships.

 

 

Social and Emotional Development

Self Control

  • Demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully.

Cooperation

  • Increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing and discussion.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

 

  • Develops increased ability to make independent choices
  • Approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination and inventiveness.
  • Grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas and tasks.

 

Engagement and Persistence

 

  • Grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects and experiences
  • Shows growing capacity to maintain concentration over time on a task, question, set of directions or interactions, despite distractions and interruptions.

 

Reasoning and Problem Solving

  • Develops increasing ability to find more than one solution to a question, task or problem.
  • Develops increasing abilities to classify, compare and contrast objects, events and experiences

 

Physical Health and Development

Fine Motor Skills

  • Grows in hand eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads and using scissors.