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Video: 

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A problem solving experience is provided during a math activity.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.D.03- Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class develop competence in verbal and nonverbal communication by responding to questions; communicating...thoughts and experiences...

During the course of this activity, the children engage in discussions with each other and with Ms. Nitchais-Reierson. Words that are new to the children's vocabulary such as "horizontal" and "vertical" are reinforced with gestures indicating which direction is horizontal and which is vertical. The children also discuss how they chose to complete the activity.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.05- Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to help them understand the concept of measurement by using...non-standard units of measurement.  

The children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's small group work to solve a problem she presents. They are to figure out how use rectangles to cover a square piece of paper. The task can be viewed as determining how many horizontal rectangles and how many vertical rectangles it takes to cover the square.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.07- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of content to pose problems and ask questions that stimulate children's thinking ...

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks the children several questions during the activity. She asks questions like, "What happens if you turned all of those rectangles horizontal?" and, "Are yours the same?". Questions like these encourage the children to think about what they are doing and why they are doing it and contribute to the development of critical thinking skills.

IELS

IELS: 

8.2-Engagement and Persistence

Children purposefully choose and persist in experiences and activities.

Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class persist in and complete...caregiver-directed...activities...

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson tells the children in her small group that they have a problem to solve. She asks them to figure out how to use eight rectangles of paper to completely cover a large square piece of paper. She informs them of the rules and then lets the children solve the problem. The children take up this task willingly.

9.3-Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

The children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class interact comfortably with...familiar caregivers ... accept guidance...and directions from...familiar caregivers... show trust in familiar caregivers...and...seek help as needed from familiar caregivers.

The children demonstrate their comfort with Ms. Nitchais-Reierson by the relaxed way they talk with her. They follow her directions and feel comfortable asking for help when needed as demonstrated by the ease of which they ask questions when difficulties with the activity arise.

11.5-Scientific Problem Solving

Children apply and adapt strategies to solve problems.

Each child in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's small group uses his/her senses and variety of strategies to solve problems...and...experiments and adapts strategies.

The children working on this activity with Ms. Nitchais-Reierson use their sense of sight to determine if the rectangles are completely covering the white square or not. Some of the ideas the children have about completing the task do not work initially. Children then rethink their strategies and try again to complete the task.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.15- Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class develop competence in verbal and nonverbal communication by responding to questions; communicating...thoughts and experiences...

During the course of this activity, the children engage in discussions with each other and with Ms. Nitchais-Reierson. Words that are new to the children's vocabulary such as "horizontal" and "vertical" are reinforced with gestures indicating which direction is horizontal and which is vertical. The children also discuss how they chose to complete the activity.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.25- Children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to help them understand the concept of measurement by using...non-standard units of measurement.  

The children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's small group work to solve a problem she presents. They are to figure out how use rectangles to cover a square piece of paper. The task can be viewed as determining how many horizontal rectangles and how many vertical rectangles it takes to cover the square.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.17- Ms. Nitchais-Reierson uses her knowledge of content to pose problems and ask questions that stimulate children's thinking ...

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson asks the children several questions during the activity. She asks questions like, "What happens if you turned all of those rectangles horizontal?" and, "Are yours the same?". Questions like these encourage the children to think about what they are doing and why they are doing it and contribute to the development of critical thinking skills.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(B) - Ms. Nitchais-Reierson is fostering independence by having the children follow simple rules to cover up a large rectangle using smaller rectangles.

Ms. Nitchais-Reierson tells the children in her small group that they have a problem to solve. She asks them to figure out how to use eight rectangles of paper to completely cover a large square piece of paper. She informs them of the rules and then lets the children independently solve the problem. The children take up this task willingly.

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(C) - Ms. Nitchais-Reierson is encouraging self-control by setting clear, consistent limits and having realistic expectations of the children while they problem solve.

The children in Ms. Nitchais-Reierson's small group work to solve a problem she presents. They are to figure out how use small rectangles to cover a larger square piece of paper. She informs them of the rules and then lets the children solve the problem on their own while offering them assistance when they ask.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Mathematics

Number and Operations

  • Demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quality.
  • Begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities and written numerals in meaningful ways.
  • Begins to make use of one to one correspondences in counting objects and matching groups of objects.
  • Begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.
  • Develops increased abilities to combine, separate and name “how many” concrete objects.

Geometry and Spatial Sense

  • Begins to recognize, describe, compare and name common shapes, their parts and attributes.
  • Begins to be able to determine whether or not two shapes are the same size and shape.
  • Shows growth in matching, sorting, putting in a series and regrouping objects according to one or two attributes such as color, shape or size.
  • Builds in increasing understanding of directionality, order and positions of objects, and words such as up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front and behind.

Patterns and Measurement

  • Shows progress in using standard and non-standard measures for length and area of objects.

 

Science

Scientific Skills and Methods

  • Develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.
  • Begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions and form generalizations.
  • Begins to describe predictions, explanations and generalizations based on past experiences.

Scientific Knowledge

  • Shows increased awareness and beginning understanding of changes in materials and cause-effect relationships.

 

Physcial Health and Development

Fine Motor Skills

  • Progresses in abilities to use writing, drawing and art tools including pencils, markers, chalk, paint brushes and various types of technology.