Morning Message

Video: 

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Literacy skills develop when children help Ms. Kimpston write a sentence.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.05- Children see... Ms. Kimpston...model functional use of writing.

Ms. Kimpston writes a sentence on a white board during group time. She describes the mechanics of how she is writing the sentence and asks the children in her class for their ideas on different aspects of writing such as spacing, what a sentence begins with and where she should start writing when she begins a new line. The sentence she writes lets the children know one of the planned activities for the day.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.06- Children in Ms. Kimpston's class are provided multiple and varied opportunities to develop phonological awareness: They are encouraged to play with the sounds of language, including syllables...and phonemes... The children are helped to name...letters and say the sounds they represent.

Ms. Kimpston helps the children in her class sound out the word "chicks" by breaking the word into phonemes. When she writes the first word on the white board, she enunciates the sounds the letters make (wuh-ee) and the children say the word "we".

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.13- Ms. Kimpston promotes children's engagement and learning by guiding them in acquiring specific skills and by explicitly teaching those skills.

Ms. Kimpston teaches the children in her class to sound out words and to use the individual letter sounds as a guide to pronouncing words. When the children encounter an unfamiliar word, "chicks", Ms. Kimpston helps the children hear the sounds of the individual phonemes, and then combine the sounds to form the word "chicks".

IELS

IELS: 

9.3-Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

Children in Ms. Kimpston's class interact comfortably with a range of familiar caregivers...and...accept guidance... and directions from a range of familiar caregivers.

Ms. Kimpston leads the children in her class in their morning sentence. The children interact with her comfortably. They respond to Ms. Kimpston's questions about the mechanics of writing a sentence. The children are also responsive when Ms. Peterson points out that the word "chicks" was in another book the class read together.

10.1-Language Understanding and Use

Children understand and use communication and language for a variety of purposes.

Children in Ms. Kimpston's class show a steady increase in listening and speaking vocabulary... listen, and respond appropriately in conversations... with... caregivers... and answer a variety of question types.

As the children work with Ms. Kimpston to write their morning sentence, they use phrases like "capital letter" and "finger space". Ms. Kimpston asks the children a variety of questions including, "What does a sentence start with?" and "Where do I need to go?" and the children respond appropriately.

10.2-Early Literacy

Children engage in early reading experiences.

The children in Ms. Kimpston's class demonstrate awareness that language is made up of words, parts of words, and sounds in words.

Ms. Kimpston models for her class the sounds that letters make and how those sounds create words. This is evident when she breaks down the word "chicks" into individual sounds and works with the children until they sound out the word.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.21- Children see... Ms. Kimpston...model functional use of writing.

Ms. Kimpston writes a sentence on a white board during group time. She describes the mechanics of how she is writing the sentence and asks the children in her class for their ideas on different aspects of writing such as spacing, what a sentence begins with and where she should start writing when she begins a new line. The sentence she writes lets the children know one of the planned activities for the day.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.22- Children in Ms. Kimpston's class are provided multiple and varied opportunities to develop phonological awareness: They are encouraged to play with the sounds of language, including syllables...and phonemes... The children are helped to name...letters and say the sounds they represent.

Ms. Kimpston helps the children in her class sound out the word "chicks" by breaking the word into phonemes. When she writes the first word on the white board, she enunciates the sounds the letters make (wuh-ee) and the children say the word "we".

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.20- Ms. Kimpston promotes children's engagement and learning by guiding them in acquiring specific skills and by explicitly teaching those skills.

Ms. Kimpston teaches the children in her class to sound out words and to use the individual letter sounds as a guide to pronouncing words. When the children encounter an unfamiliar word, "chicks", Ms. Kimpston helps the children hear the sounds of the individual phonemes, and then combine the sounds to form the word "chicks".

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(4)(iii) - Ms. Kimpston promotes interaction and language use among children and between children and adults during the morning message time. 

Ms. Kimpston is leading the children in a large group activity to write out their morning message. She encourages the children to chime in with what they know as she works through the message. As Ms. Kimpston writes their morning sentence, she uses phrases like “capital letter” and “finger space”. Ms. Kimpston asks the children a variety of questions including, “What does a sentence start with?” and “Where do I need to go?” and the children respond appropriately.

1304.21(a)(5)(iii) - Ms. Kimpston’s class provides an appropriate environment and adult guidance for the participation of children with special needs.

Ms. Kimpston’s class is part of a program in a public school that is inclusive of children with special needs. A special education consultant/teacher floats between two preschool classrooms to ensure that all identified children receive appropriate support and services while being fully integrated into these preschool classes.