Morning Group Job Chart

Video: 

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Ms. Romig's job chart outlines children's responsibilities for the day.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.D.03-Children in Ms. Romig's class have...opportunities to develop competence in verbal and nonverbal communication by responding to questions...

Ms. Romig asks different types of questions that children in her class can respond to verbally and nonverbally. When she asks whose name appears on the job chart in the place where she is pointing, the child raises his or her hand. Then Ms. Romig asks the child what job they will be doing that day and the child responds with the name of the job.

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.D.04- Ms. Romig's class has opportunities to develop vocabulary through conversations.

Ms. Romig makes a point of using positional words ("top" and "under") when reviewing the job chart. She gives a slight emphasis to the positional words when she uses them with her students thereby drawing children's attention to the words.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Social Studies

2.E.03- Children in Ms. Romig's class are offered opportunities to become part of the classroom community so that each child feels accepted and gains a sense of belonging.

The job chart in Ms. Romig's classroom is divided into two sections. One day, the children listed on one side of the chart have jobs to do. The next day, the children on the other side of the chart have jobs. With a job to do every other day, the children regularly experience the importance of the role of each member in a community.

IELS

IELS: 

8.2-Engagement and Persistence

Children purposefully choose and persist in experiences and activities.

Children in Ms. Romig's class persist in and complete a variety of caregiver-directed...tasks, ...activities, ...and experiences.

When Ms. Romig draws her class's attention to the job chart, she encourages the children to read the name of the child responsible for a certain task. Cards with a picture representation of the task as well as the name of the task follow the children's names so they can see which job they are responsible for.

9.5-Awareness of Community

Children have an increasing awareness of belonging to a family, community, culture, and program.

Children in Ms. Romig's class show early understanding of...the welfare of the community and its members...and show responsibility as a member of a community.

The children in Ms. Romig's class learn the importance of responsibility by completing assigned tasks that contribute to the welfare of their classroom community.

10.1-Language Understanding and Use

Children understand and use communication and language for a variety of purposes.

Children in Ms. Romig's class show a steady increase in listening vocabulary. They also listen and respond appropriately in conversations with...caregivers...and answer a variety of question types.

The children in Ms. Romig's class understand positional words such as "top" and "under". When Ms. Romig asks the class whose name is on top of the job chart, the appropriate child raises her hand and waits for Ms. Romig to ask what her job is for the day. She then asks the class whose name is under the previous one. The children answer questions related to individual names, position of the name in relation to others, and the job to be performed that day.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.15-Children in Ms. Romig's class have...opportunities to develop competence in verbal and nonverbal communication by responding to questions...

Ms. Romig asks different types of questions that children in her class can respond to verbally and nonverbally. When she asks whose name appears on the job chart in the place where she is pointing, the child raises his or her hand. Then Ms. Romig asks the child what job they will be doing that day and the child responds with the name of the job.

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.16- Ms. Romig's class has opportunities to develop vocabulary through conversations.

Ms. Romig makes a point of using positional words ("top" and "under") when reviewing the job chart. She gives a slight emphasis to the positional words when she uses them with her students thereby drawing children's attention to the words.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Social Studies

2.37 - Children in Ms. Romig's class are offered opportunities to become part of the classroom community so that each child feels accepted and gains a sense of belonging.

The job chart in Ms. Romig's classroom is divided into two sections. One day, the children listed on one side of the chart have jobs to do. The next day, the children on the other side of the chart have jobs. With a job to do every other day, the children regularly experience the importance of the role of each member in a community.

HSPS

HSPS: 

 

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(B) – Ms. Romig supports social and emotional development and encourages development which enhances each child’s strengths by fostering independence through the daily assignment of jobs to the children in her classroom.

The children in Ms. Romig's class learn the importance of responsibility by completing assigned tasks that contribute to the welfare of their classroom community.

1304.21(c)(1)(v) – Ms. Romig provides experiences for the children on a daily basis which enhances each child’s understanding of self as an individual and as a member of a group.

The job chart in Ms. Romig's classroom is divided into two sections. One day, the children listed on one side of the chart have jobs to do. The next day, the children on the other side of the chart have jobs. With a job to do every other day, the children regularly experience the importance of the role of each member in a community. Each child assigned a job has his or her own individual task to complete but in doing so, all children benefit from this contribution to the classroom community

 

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

  • Demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.
  • Shows progress in understanding and following simple and multiple-step directions.
  • Understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Speaking and Communication

  • Develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions, and for other varied purposes
  • Progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults
  • Uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.
  • Progresses in clarity of pronunciation and towards speaking in sentences of increasing length and grammatical complexity.

 

Literacy

Phonological Awareness

  • Associates sounds with written words, such as awareness that different words begin with the same sounds.

Print Awareness and Concepts

  • Shows increasing awareness of print in classroom, home and community settings.
  • Demonstrates increasing awareness of concepts of print, such as that reading in English moves from top to bottom and from left to right, that speech can be written down, and that print conveys a message.

Early Writing

  • Develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.

Alphabet Knowledge

  • Shows progress in associating the names of letters with their shapes and sounds.
  • Increases in ability to notice the beginning letters in familiar words.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Self Control

  • Demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

Knowledge of Families and Communities

  • Develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities
  • Approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination and inventiveness.

Enagagement and Persistence

  • Grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects and experiences
  • Demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans.

 

Physical Health and Development

Health Status and Practices

  • Builds awareness and ability to follow basic health and safety rules such as fire safety, traffic and pedestrian safety, and responding appropriately to potentially harmful objects, substances and activities.