Looking at Shapes

Video: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Explorations in geometry transfer to everyday life.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum: Essential Characteristics

2.A.10- The curriculum guides...Ms. Carlat...to incorporate content, concepts, and activities that foster...cognitive development and that integrate key areas of content including...mathematics...

The book that Ms. Carlat shares with her small group encourages the children to think about two and three-dimensional shapes and how they can find examples of those shapes in everyday life. The book introduces three-dimensional shapes and then relates them to objects children can see around them. A rectangular prism becomes a tall building, a sphere becomes a baseball and a cube becomes a puzzle game.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.06- Children in Ms. Carlat's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to understand basic concepts of geometry, for example, by naming and recognizing two- and three-dimensional shapes and recognizing how figures are composed of different shapes.

Children explore a book about shapes with Ms. Carlat to make connections between the shapes in the book and objects they may encounter in daily life. One child notices that a cone looks like an ice cream cone or a "castle piece". A boy notes that a sphere looks like a scoop of ice cream that could go on top of the ice cream cone. He also notes that a cylinder looks like a popsicle.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.07- Ms. Carlat uses her knowledge of content to...ask questions that stimulate children's thinking. She helps ...children express their ideas and build on the meaning of their experiences.

Ms. Carlat points out that a tall building is in the shape of a rectangular prism. She then asks a girl in the group if her dad works in a building like the one shown in the book and the girl confirms that he does.

IELS

IELS: 

8.1-Curiosity and Initiative

Children express curiosity, interest, and initiative in exploring the environment, engaging in experiences, and learning new skills.

Children in Ms. Carlat's small group explore...activities and ideas with eagerness...

Ms. Carlat shares a book entitled "Solid Shapes" with a group of children in her class. The children are very engaged and curious about the shapes in the book and how they can see examples of those shapes in the world around them.

9.3-Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

The children in Ms. Carlat's small group interact comfortably with...familiar caregivers...and...accept guidance...and directions from... familiar caregivers.

Children in Ms. Carlat's small group feel comfortable asking her questions and sharing their ideas with her. They are receptive to her re-direction when they all want to share their ideas at the same time.

11.3-Shapes and Spatial Relationships

Children understand shapes and spatial relationships.

A small group of children in Ms. Carlat's class shows more recognition for some simple shapes...and...notices similarities and differences among shapes.

The children in Ms. Carlat's small group identify shapes on the faces of three-dimensional shapes (triangle on a pyramid, square on a cube). The children begin to describe some of the shapes in terms of familiar objects. One child mentions that a cone looks like an upside down ice cream cone, while another child says that a sphere looks like something his dad uses to exercise. Ms. Carlat asks a girl if her dad works in a building similar to one shown in the book. When the girl confirms he does, Ms. Carlat points out that the building shape is a rectangular prism.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum: Essential Characteristics

2.9- The curriculum guides...Ms. Carlat...to incorporate content, concepts, and activities that foster...cognitive development and that integrate key areas of content including...mathematics...

The book that Ms. Carlat shares with her small group encourages the children to think about two and three-dimensional shapes and how they can find examples of those shapes in everyday life. The book introduces three-dimensional shapes and then relates them to objects children can see around them. A rectangular prism becomes a tall building, a sphere becomes a baseball and a cube becomes a puzzle game.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.26- Children in Ms. Carlat's class are provided varied opportunities and materials to understand basic concepts of geometry, for example, by naming and recognizing two- and three-dimensional shapes and recognizing how figures are composed of different shapes.

Children explore a book about shapes with Ms. Carlat to make connections between the shapes in the book and objects they may encounter in daily life. One child notices that a cone looks like an ice cream cone or a "castle piece". A boy notes that a sphere looks like a scoop of ice cream that could go on top of the ice cream cone. He also notes that a cylinder looks like a popsicle.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children's Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.17- Ms. Carlat uses her knowledge of content to...ask questions that stimulate children's thinking. She helps ...children express their ideas and build on the meaning of their experiences.

Ms. Carlat points out that a tall building is in the shape of a rectangular prism. She then asks a girl in the group if her dad works in a building like the one shown in the book and the girl confirms that he does.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(C) - Ms. Carlat has supports social and emotional development by encouraging self-control by setting clear, consistent limits and having realistic expectations during a small group experience.

Ms. Carlat conducts a small group lesson during which she shares a book entitled “Solid Shapes”. At various points during the lesson, Ms. Carlat gives gentle reminders to children about rules and expectations for behavior during small group lessons. The children comply without complaint or escalation and the lesson proceeds smoothly with little or no interruptions.

1304.21(c)(1)(ii) – Ms. Carlat provides for the development of cognitive skills by encouraging each child to organize his or her experiences, to understand concepts, and to develop age appropriate literacy, numeracy, and reasoning…skills which form a foundation for school readiness and later school success as she shares a book with the children about various three-dimensional shapes.

The book that Ms. Carlat shares with her small group encourages the children to think about two- and three-dimensional shapes and how they can find examples of those shapes in everyday life. One child mentions that a cone looks like an upside down ice cream cone, while another child says that a sphere looks like something his dad uses to exercise. Ms. Carlat asks a girl if her dad works in a building similar to one shown in the book. When the girl confirms he does, Ms. Carlat points out that the building shape is a rectangular prism.

1304.21(c)(1)(vii) - Ms.Carlat has provides individual and small group experiences both indoors and outdoors.

Ms. Carlat plans structured small group activities for the children in her class. She provides the children opportunities to share ideas and get more individualized teaching and attention from her during these small group lessons.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Mathematics

Geometry and Spatial Sense

  • Begins to recognize, describe, compare and name common shapes, their parts and attributes.
  • Begins to be able to determine whether or not two shapes are the same size and shape.

 

Science

Scientific Knowledge

  • Expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe and discuss the natural world, materials, living things and natural processes.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Cooperation

  • Increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing and discussion.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities
  • Develops increased ability to make independent choices
  • Approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination and inventiveness.
  • Grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas and tasks.