I Can Read!

Video: 

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Sam has early reading experiences with a familiar book.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.04—Sam has opportunities to…be read books in an engaging manner… and …explore books on his own and have places that are conducive to quiet enjoyment of books.

Ms. Thompson reads “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” in such a way that keeps the children’s attention. They predict what will happen next in the book and talk about their favorite parts. When Sam reads the book independently, he does so in a small loft area that gives him some separation from the rest of the class.

 

IELS

IELS: 

9.1—Self

Children express a positive awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics, and preferences.

Sam shows increasing confidence and independence in…tasks and…expresses pride in accomplishments.

Sam chooses to read “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” on his own. When he finishes the book, he exclaims “I can read!” and rushes to find his teachers to share the excitement of his discovery.

9.3—Relationships with Caregivers

Children relate positively to caregivers who work with them.

Sam interacts comfortably with a range of familiar caregivers.

Sam is excited to tell his teachers that he can read “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by himself. When Ms. Thompson asks Sam to read the book to her, he eagerly sits beside her and begins to read.

10.2—Early Literacy

Children engage in early reading experiences.

Sam shows an interest and enjoyment in listening to books and attempts to read familiar books.

Sam’s enjoyment of “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” is revealed when he chooses to read the book several days after Ms. Thompson reads it to his class.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.20—Sam has opportunities to…be read books in an engaging manner… and …explore books on his own and have places that are conducive to quiet enjoyment of books.

Ms. Thompson reads “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” in such a way that keeps the children’s attention. They predict what will happen next in the book and talk about their favorite parts. When Sam reads the book independently, he does so in a small loft area that gives him some separation from the rest of the class.

 

HSPS

HSPS: 

 

1304.21(c)(1)(ii) - Ms. Thompson provides for the development of cognitive skills by encouraging each child to organize his or her experiences, to understand concepts, and to develop age appropriate literacy, numeracy, reasoning, problem solving and decision making skills which form a foundation for school readiness and later school success through story reading.

Ms. Thompson reads “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” in such a way that keeps the children engaged in the story. They predict what will happen next in the book and talk about their favorite parts. This is more clearly evident when one child rereads the story independently. He draws from his memory of the repeated readings in the large group setting and uses the illustrations as clues to retell the story.

1304.21(c)(1)(iv) - Sam demonstrates that the program environment helps children develop emotional security and facility in social relationships by running to Ms. Thompson and expressing his great enthusiasm for being able to read the book.

Sam is excited to tell his teachers that he can read “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by himself. When Ms. Thompson asks Sam to read the book to her, he eagerly sits beside her and begins to read.

1304.21(c)(1)(vi) - Ms. Thompson provides each child with opportunities for success to help develop feelings of competence, self-esteem, and positive attitudes toward learning.

Sam’s enjoyment of “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” is revealed when he chooses to read the book several days after Ms. Thompson reads it to his class. When he finishes the book, he exclaims “I can read!” and rushes to find his teachers to share the excitement of his discovery.

 

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

  • Demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.

Speaking and Communicating

  • Develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions, and for other varied purposes. 
  • Progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults.
  • Progresses in clarity of pronunciation and towards speaking in sentences of increasing length and grammatical complexity.

 

Literacy

Book Knowledge and Appreciation

  • Shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and poetry.
  • Shows growing interest in reading-related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book read; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.
  • Demonstrates progress in abilities to retell and dictate stories from books and experiences; to act out stories in dramatic play; and to predict what will happen next in a story.
  • Progresses in learning how to handle and care for books; knowing to view one page at a time in sequence from front to back; and understanding that a book has a title, author and illustrator.

Print Awareness and Concepts

  • Shows increasing awareness of print in classroom, home and community settings.
  • Develops growing understanding of the different functions of forms of print such as signs, letters, newspapers, lists, messages, and memos.
  • Demonstrates increasing awareness of concepts of print, such as that reading in English moves from top to bottom and from left to right, that speech can be written down, and that print conveys a message.
  • Shows progress in recognizing the association between spoken and written words by following print as it is read aloud.
  • Recognizes a word as a unit of print, or awareness that letters are grouped to form words and that words are separated by spaces.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Self Concept

  • Begins to develop and express awareness of self in terms of specific abilities, characteristics and preferences.
  • Demonstrates growing confidence in a range of abilities and expresses pride in accomplishments

Self Control

  • Shows progress in expressing feelings, needs and opinions in difficult situations and conflicts without harming themselves, others, or property.
  • Demonstrates increasing capacity to follow rules and routines and use materials purposefully, safely, and respectfully.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Develops increased ability to make independent choices
  • Approaches tasks and activities with increased flexibility, imagination and inventiveness.

Engagement and Persistance

  • Grows in abilities to persist in and complete a variety of tasks, activities, projects and experiences
  • Demonstrates increasing ability to set goals and develop and follow through on plans