Humpty Dumpty

Video: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

A group reading activity centers on a familiar nursery rhyme.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum: Essential Characteristics

2.E.05— The curriculum guides…Ms. Katter…to incorporate content, concepts, and activities that foster…language, and cognitive development and that integrate key areas of content including…science…

As a prelude to a reading activity, Ms. Katter engages the children in her class in a discussion about eggs. She asks children to tell her what they know about eggs. The children discuss physical properties of eggs as well as what kinds of animals can hatch from eggs. Ms. Katter points out that eggs found in supermarkets come from chickens.

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.F.02— Children have varied opportunities to develop vocabulary through conversations…and…experiences…

Ms. Katter asks the children in her class what they know about eggs. One child mentions that eggs can crack while another shares that rotten eggs smell bad. When Ms. Katter asks if anyone knows what the yellow part of an egg is called, one child replies “olk”. Ms. Katter states that the yellow part of the egg is actually called the “yolk”.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

3.G.13— Children in Ms. Katter’s class have varied opportunities to: be read books in an engaging manner in group…settings…engage in conversations that help them understand the content of the book…and…be assisted in linking books to other aspects of the curriculum…

Ms. Katter captures children’s attention by enlisting their help in reading “Humpty Dumpty” posted on the board. A conversation is held before reading to help the children make connections to their prior knowledge about eggs (eggs can produce different animals, eggs in supermarkets come from chickens) before doing choral reading in the large group.

IELS

IELS: 

8.2—Engagement and Persistence

Children purposefully choose and persist in experiences and activities.

Children in Ms. Katter’s class persist in and complete a variety of…caregiver-directed…tasks, activities, projects, and experiences…and…maintain concentration on a task.

A reading activity in Ms. Katter’s class engages the children in such a way that their attention and focus remains strong through the entire activity.

10.1—Language Understanding and Use

Children understand and use communication and language for a variety of purposes.

The children in Ms. Katter’s class show a steady increase in listening and speaking vocabulary.

The children in Ms. Katter’s class have a discussion about eggs before reading “Humpty Dumpty.” Children tell Ms. Katter different things they know about eggs (they can crack, rotten eggs smell bad, etc.). Theyc experience words like “yolk” in their discussion.

10.2—Early Literacy

Children engage in early reading experiences.

Children in Ms. Katter’s class display book handling knowledge (…using left to right sweep … ).

During a group reading session in Ms. Katter’s class, she asks the children where they will start reading “Humpty Dumpty”. The children answer “at the top!” She then indicates with a pointer the left and right side of the text and asks which side they start reading on, and the children indicate the left side.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum: Essential Characteristics

2.9— The curriculum guides…Ms. Katter…to incorporate content, concepts, and activities that foster…language, and cognitive development and that integrate key areas of content including…science…

As a prelude to a reading activity, Ms. Katter engages the children in her class in a discussion about eggs. She asks children to tell her what they know about eggs. The children discuss physical properties of eggs as well as what kinds of animals can hatch from eggs. Ms. Katter points out that eggs found in supermarkets come from chickens.

Areas of Development: Language Development

2.16— Children have varied opportunities to develop vocabulary through conversations…and…experiences…

Ms. Katter asks the children in her class what they know about eggs. One child mentions that eggs can crack while another shares that rotten eggs smell bad. When Ms. Katter asks if anyone knows what the yellow part of an egg is called, one child replies “olk”. Ms. Katter states that the yellow part of the egg is actually called the “yolk”.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.20— Children in Ms. Katter’s class have varied opportunities to: be read books in an engaging manner in group…settings…engage in conversations that help them understand the content of the book…and…be assisted in linking books to other aspects of the curriculum…

Ms. Katter captures children’s attention by enlisting their help in reading “Humpty Dumpty” posted on the board. A conversation is held before reading to help the children make connections to their prior knowledge about eggs (eggs can produce different animals, eggs in supermarkets come from chickens) before doing choral reading in the large group.

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(1)(iii) – Ms. Katter provides an environment of acceptance that supports and respects gender, culture, language, ethnicity and family composition by accepting a variety of answers to her open-ended questions.

The children in Ms. Katter’s class were able to answer the question, “What do you know about an egg?”  She accepts children’s knowledge about Humpty Dumpty and the children’s life experiences with eggs. 

1304.21(a)(3)(i)(A) - Ms. Katter encourages development which enhances each child’s strengths by building trust as she asks the children a variety of questions and accepts their answers.

As a prelude to a reading activity, Ms. Katter engages the children in her class in a discussion about eggs. She asks children to tell her what they know about eggs. The children discuss physical properties of eggs as well as what kinds of animals can hatch from eggs.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

  • Demonstrates increasing ability to attend to and understand conversations, stories, songs, and poems.
  • Understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Speaking and Communicating

  • Develops increasing abilities to understand and use language to communicate information, experiences, ideas, feelings, opinions, needs, questions, and for other varied purposes
  • Progresses in abilities to initiate and respond appropriately in conversation and discussions with peers and adults.
  • Uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.

 

Literacy

Book Knowledge and Appreciation

  • Shows growing interest and involvement in listening to and discussing a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and poetry.
  • Shows growing interest in reading-related activities, such as asking to have a favorite book read; choosing to look at books; drawing pictures based on stories; asking to take books home; going to the library; and engaging in pretend-reading with other children.

Print Awareness and Concepts

  • Develops growing understanding of the different functions of forms of print such as signs, letters, newspapers, lists, messages, and memos
  • Demonstrates increasing awareness of concepts of print, such as that reading in English moves from top to bottom and from left to right, that speech can be written down, and that print conveys a message.
  • Shows progress in recognizing the association between spoken and written words by following print as it is read aloud.

 

Science

Scientific Skills and Methods

  • Begins to participate in simple investigations to test observations, discuss and draw conclusions and form generalizations.
  • Develops increased ability to observe and discuss common properties, differences and comparisons among objects and materials.
  • Begins to describe predictions, explanations and generalizations based on past experiences.

Scientific Knowledge

  • Shows increased awareness and beginning understanding of changes in materials and cause-effect relationships.

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Chooses to participate in an increasing variety of tasks and activities
  • Develops increased ability to make independent choices
  • Grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas and tasks.

Engagement and Persistence

  • Shows growing capacity to maintain concentration over time on a task, question, set of directions or interactions, despite distractions and interruptions.