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Counting in Ms. Romig's class provides rich learning opportunities.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.E.05—Garrett sees Ms. Romig model functional use of writing…

Ms. Romig writes the number of children in her class on the board. She asks Garrett to write the same number below hers. She then writes the names of two children who are absent on the board. She writes “2” on the board and asks Garrett to write “2”.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.02—Garrett is provided varied opportunities and materials to build understanding of numbers, number names, and their relationship to object quantities and to symbols.

Garrett has an opportunity to understand numbers and their relationships to quantities when he counts the children in his class and writes that number on the board. Ms. Romig writes “18” on the board and invites Garrett to do the same. She explains that writing a “1” and an “8” together is how “18” is written, thus connecting the number names to their written symbols.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children’s Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.13—Ms. Romig promotes children’s engagement and learning by guiding them in acquiring specific skills…

Children in Ms. Romig’s class count as part of their daily routine. The “teacher helper” for the day leads the counting and has the opportunity to write the number of children present and absent on the board.

 

IELS

IELS: 

9.5—Awareness of Community

Children have an increasing awareness of belonging to a family, community, culture, and program.

Garrett shows that he values others within the classroom and shows responsibility as a member of a community.

Garrett takes responsibility for doing his job by helping Ms. Romig count the number of children at preschool. He values others in the classroom by noticing who is not at preschool and telling Ms. Romig the names of those children.

10.3—Early Writing

Children engage in early writing experiences.

Garrett attempts to communicate with others using scribbles, shapes, pictures, and/or letters to write.

Garrett copies the numbers that Ms. Romig writes on the board, signifying the number of children at preschool. Ms. Romig then writes a “2” signifying the number of children absent. Garrett’s attempt to write “2” on the board is acknowledged by Ms. Romig.

11.1—Comparison and Number

Children understand amount, including use of numbers and counting.

Garrett counts objects, matching numbers one-to-one with objects.

Garrett counts children in his class by placing his hand on his own chest and counting “1”. He then places his hand on the head of each child as he counts, solidifying the one-to-one correspondence.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Literacy Development

2.21—Garrett sees Ms. Romig model functional use of writing…

Ms. Romig writes the number of children in her class on the board. She asks Garrett to write the same number below hers. She then writes the names of two children who are absent on the board. She writes “2” on the board and asks Garrett to write “2”.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.23—Garrett is provided varied opportunities and materials to build understanding of numbers, number names, and their relationship to object quantities and to symbols.

Garrett has an opportunity to understand numbers and their relationships to quantities when he counts the children in his class and writes that number on the board. Ms. Romig writes “18” on the board and invites Garrett to do the same. She explains that writing a “1” and an “8” together is how “18” is written, thus connecting the number names to their written symbols.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children’s Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.20—Ms. Romig promotes children’s engagement and learning by guiding them in acquiring specific skills…

Children in Ms. Romig’s class count as part of their daily routine. The “teacher helper” for the day leads the counting and has the opportunity to write the number of children present and absent on the board.

 

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(4)(iv) - Ms. Romig supports emerging literacy and numeracy development through materials and activities…such as providing Garrett with a job of counting the number of children at preschool…according to the developmental level of each child.

Garrett counts children in his class by placing his hand on his own chest and counting “1”. He then places his hand on the head of each child as he counts, solidifying the one-to-one correspondence. Garrett then copies the numbers that Ms. Romig writes on the board, signifying the number of children at preschool. Ms. Romig then writes a “2” signifying the number of children absent. Garrett’s attempt to write “2” on the board is acknowledged by Ms. Romig.

1304.21(c)(1)(v) – Ms. Romig enhances each child’s understanding of self as an individual and as a member of a group through a daily attendance routine assigned to a different child each day as a job.

Garrett takes responsibility for doing his job by helping Ms. Romig count the number of children at preschool. He values others in the classroom by noticing who is not at preschool and telling Ms. Romig the names of those children.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Literacy

Print Awareness and Concepts

  • Shows increasing awareness of print in classroom, home and community settings.
  • Shows progress in recognizing the association between spoken and written words by following print as it is read aloud.

Early Writing

  • Develops understanding that writing is a way of communicating for a variety of purposes.
  • Experiments with a growing variety of writing tools and materials, such as pencils, crayons, and computers.
  • Progress from using scribbles, shapes, or pictures to represent ideas, to using letter-like symbols, to copying or writing familiar words such as their own name.

 

Mathematics

Number and Operations

  • Demonstrates increasing interest and awareness of numbers and counting as a means for solving problems and determining quality.
  • Begins to associate number concepts, vocabulary, quantities and written numerals in meaningful ways.
  • Develops increasing ability to count in sequence to 10 and beyond.
  • Begins to make use of one to one correspondences in counting objects and matching groups of objects.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Self Concept

  • Develops growing capacity for independence in a range of activities, routines, and tasks.

Knowledge of Families and Communities

  • Develops growing awareness of jobs and what is required to perform them