Exploring 3D Shapes

Video: 

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Observation and analysis lead to discovery of an unfamiliar shape.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.03— Children in Ms. Carlat’s class are provided varied opportunities and materials to categorize by…shape…

The children in Ms. Carlat’s small group categorize three dimensional shapes. They see different examples of rectangular prisms and cylinders and one shape they initially think is a pyramid. Ms. Carlat presents them with a pyramid so the children can compare the new shape to it. The children determine that the new shape is a prism, not a pyramid.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.F.06— The children in Ms. Carlat’s class are provided varied opportunities and materials to understand basic concepts of geometry, for example, by naming and recognizing two- and three-dimensional shapes and recognizing how figures are composed of different shapes.

Ms. Carlat’s small group easily identifies rectangular prisms. When she introduces a triangular shape, one child states that it’s a pyramid. The children begin to explore the similarities and differences between the triangular shape and a pyramid. After some discussion, the children determine the triangular shape is a prism.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children’s Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.G.07— Ms. Carlat uses her knowledge of content to pose problems and ask questions that stimulate childrens thinking…

When Ms. Carlat presents the pyramid and prism together, she asks, “Are they the same?” The children immediately recognize that the shapes are not the same. She

asks the children to notice what is different between the two. The group decides to count the sides, and they determine the number of sides is the same. Charlie notices that the sides of the pyramid come together at a point and that helps the group determine that they are looking at a pyramid and a triangular prism.

 

 

 

IELS

IELS: 

7.2—Play and Senses

Children engage in play to learn.

Children in Ms. Carlat’s class use sight…to… discriminate between, explore, and experience activities and materials.

Ms. Carlat reviews the names of different three-dimensional shapes with a small group of children. She shows them several different types of rectangular prisms and cylinders and then shows them a shape that a child believes is a pyramid. Ms. Carlat shows the children a pyramid and they compare the two shapes. After some discussion, they determine that the new shape is a prism, not a pyramid.

8.1—Curiosity and Initiative

Children express curiosity, interest, and initiative in exploring the environment, engaging in experiences, and learning new skills.

Children in Ms. Carlat’s class explore…activities…with eagerness…and a… willingness to try new challenges.

The children exploring shapes with Ms. Carlat show enthusiasm when exploring the differences between pyramids and triangular prisms. They visually discriminate the differences and similarities between the two, count the number of sides and determine that one shape is a pyramid and one is a prism.

11.3—Shapes and Spatial Relationships

Children understand shapes and spatial relationships.

A group of children in Ms. Carlat’s class shows… recognition for some simple shapes…and…notices similarities and differences among shapes.

The children in Ms. Carlat’s small group easily identify the faces of the three-dimensional shapes she presents. When she presents them with a pyramid and a triangular prism, they notice that both shapes have triangular faces. With some guided discovery, the children realize that what one child initially termed as a pyramid is in fact a triangular prism.

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.24— Children in Ms. Carlat’s class are provided varied opportunities and materials to categorize by…shape…

The children in Ms. Carlat’s small group categorize three dimensional shapes. They see different examples of rectangular prisms and cylinders and one shape they initially think is a pyramid. Ms. Carlat presents them with a pyramid so the children can compare the new shape to it. The children determine that the new shape is a prism, not a pyramid.

Curriculum Content Areas for Cognitive Development: Early Mathematics

2.26— The children in Ms. Carlat’s class are provided varied opportunities and materials to understand basic concepts of geometry, for example, by naming and recognizing two- and three-dimensional shapes and recognizing how figures are composed of different shapes.

Ms. Carlat’s small group easily identifies rectangular prisms. When she introduces a triangular shape, one child states that it’s a pyramid. The children begin to explore the similarities and differences between the triangular shape and a pyramid. After some discussion, the children determine the triangular shape is a prism.

Using Instruction to Deepen Children’s Understanding and Build Their Skills and Knowledge

3.17— Ms. Carlat uses her knowledge of content to pose problems and ask questions that stimulate childrens thinking…

When Ms. Carlat presents the pyramid and prism together, she asks, “Are they the same?” The children immediately recognize that the shapes are not the same. She

asks the children to notice what is different between the two. The group decides to count the sides, and they determine the number of sides is the same. Charlie notices that the sides of the pyramid come together at a point and that helps the group determine that they are looking at a pyramid and a triangular prism.

 

HSPS

HSPS: 

 

1304.21(a)(1)(iv) – Ms. Carlat provides a balanced daily program of child-initiated and adult-directed activities, including individual and small group activities.

Ms. Carlat conducts a small group lesson during which the children are talking about different three-dimensional shapes. During this time, other groups of children are working with other adults in the room in their own small groups.

1304.21(a)(4)(iii) – During a small group lesson, Ms. Carlat promotes interaction and language use among children and between children and adults.

When Ms. Carlat introduces a triangular shape, one child states that it’s a pyramid. The children begin to describe the similarities and differences between the triangular shape and a pyramid. After some discussion, the children determine the triangular shape is a prism.

1304.21(a)(4)(iv) – Ms. Carlat provides experiences that are developmentally and linguistically appropriate….

Ms. Carlat presents various three-dimensional shapes to the children for them to explore. She uses the correct geometric name for each shape and has the children talk about their observations of two similar shapes.

 

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Language Development

Listening and Understanding

  • Understands an increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.

Speaking and Communicating

  • Uses an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary.

 

Mathematics

Number and Operations

  • Begins to use language to compare numbers of objects with terms such as more, less, greater than, fewer, equal to.

Geometry and Spatial Sense

  • Begins to recognize, describe, compare and name common shapes, their parts and attributes.
  • Begins to be able to determine whether or not two shapes are the same size and shape.

 

Science

Scientific Skills and Methods

  • Develops growing abilities to conflict, describe and record information through a variety of means, including discussion, drawings, maps, and charts.

Scientific Knowledge

  • Expands knowledge of and abilities to observe, describe and discuss the natural world, materials, living things and natural processes.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Cooperation

  • Increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing and discussion.
  • Shows increasing abilities to use compromise and discussion in working, playing and resolving conflicts with peers.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

Approaches to Learning

Initiative and Curiosity

  • Grows in eagerness to learn about and discuss a growing range of topics, ideas and tasks.