Building Together

Video: 

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Girls work together to build a structure.

NAEYC

NAEYC: 

Areas of Development: Physical Development

2.C.03— Children are provided varied opportunities and materials that support fine-motor development.

The girls have opportunities for fine motor development as they construct with the No-Ends materials.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.A.04— Ms. Hansen organizes space and selects materials…to stimulate exploration, experimentation, discovery, and conceptual learning.

The No-Ends materials engage children’s interest in construction. The nature of No-Ends supports cooperative play or individual play and encourages children to experiment with structures and learn basic concepts of engineering.

Using Time, Grouping, and Routines to Achieve Learning Goals

3.D.10— Ms. Hansen organizes time and space on a daily basis to allow children to work or play individually and in pairs, to come together in small groups, and to engage as a whole group.

Center time allows children to have a choice of activities and playmates. Ms. Hansen organizes space in her classroom to allow for the potentially large structures children can create with the No-Ends materials.

 

IELS

IELS: 

7.4—Fine Motor Development

Children develop fine motor skills.

Two girls in Ms. Hansen’s class use hand-eye coordination to perform…fine-motor tasks with a variety of manipulative materials.

Two girls build a structure with No-Ends building materials. At times, the process involves disassembling part of the structure to use the pieces elsewhere. The task of taking apart and putting together the pieces requires careful work and coordination, thereby promoting fine motor development.

8.2—Engagement and Persistence

Children purposefully choose and persist in experiences and activities.

Girls in Ms. Hansen’s class persist in…self-initiated…activities...

Two girls constructing with No-Ends show a great deal of persistence as they work continuously on their structure. When part of the structure falls down, one girl picks up the pieces and finds other places to put them.

9.4—Peer Interactions

Children develop the ability to interact with peers respectfully and to form positive peer relationships.

Two girls in Ms. Hansen’s class sustain interactions with peers…

In Ms. Hansen’s class, two girls build a structure together. They do not discuss what they are building yet they work together to make the structure more elaborate.

 

IQPPS

IQPPS: 

Areas of Development: Physical Development

2.13— Children are provided varied opportunities and materials that support fine-motor development.

The girls have opportunities for fine motor development as they construct with the No-Ends materials.

Designing Enriched Learning Environments

3.1— Ms. Hansen organizes space and selects materials…to stimulate exploration, experimentation, discovery, and conceptual learning.

The No-Ends materials engage children’s interest in construction. The nature of No-Ends supports cooperative play or individual play and encourages children to experiment with structures and learn basic concepts of engineering.

Using Time, Grouping, and Routines to Achieve Learning Goals

3.10— Ms. Hansen organizes time and space on a daily basis to allow children to work or play individually and in pairs, to come together in small groups, and to engage as a whole group.

Center time allows children to have a choice of activities and playmates. Ms. Hansen organizes space in her classroom to allow for the potentially large structures children can create with the No-Ends materials.

 

HSPS

HSPS: 

1304.21(a)(5)(ii) - Ms. Hansen provides appropriate time, space, equipment, materials and adult guidance for the development of fine motor skills according to each child’s developmental level.

Two girls build a structure with No-Ends building materials. At times, the process involves disassembling part of the structure to use the pieces elsewhere. The task of taking apart and putting together the pieces requires careful work and coordination, thereby promoting fine motor development.

1304.21(c)(1)(v) - Center time that encourages children to play in small groups enhances children’s understanding of self as an individual and as a member of a group.

The children in Ms. Hansen’s class are provided materials that encourage them to share and play with each other.  These girls are working jointly on a common structure where they have individual ideas about what they want to do but also work as part of a group.

HSCOF

HSCOF: 

Mathematics

Geometry and Spatial Sense

  • Progresses in ability to put together and take apart shapes.

 

Social and Emotional Development

Cooperation

  • Increases abilities to sustain interactions with peers by helping, sharing and discussion.

Social Relationships

  • Demonstrates increasing comfort in talking with and accepting guidance and directions from a range of familiar adults

 

Physical Health and Development

Fine Motor Skills

  • Grows in hand eye coordination in building with blocks, putting together puzzles, reproducing shapes and patterns, stringing beads and using scissors.