Programs of Study

Division of Athletic Training

 

Undergraduate Major (B.A.)

The Athletic Training major requires a minimum of 120 hours to graduate.  This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 20 hours. The major is designed to prepare students to become athletic training professionals.  It prepares students for the National Athletic Training Board of Certification Examination as well as eligibility for an Athletic Training License in the State of Iowa.  Curriculum is based upon cognitive and psychomotor learning experiences.  The athletic training education program is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

 

Graduate Major (M.S.)

The Master of Science in Athletic Training degree is designed for post-professionals that hold the BOC credential who wish to further develop their scholarly clinician knowledge and skills.  This program is balanced around didactic, research, and service components focused on: 1) increasing depth and breadth of athletic training subject matter and skills beyond those of the entry-level athletic trainer; 2) enhancing critical thinking to aid knowledge of discipline assumptions and develop understanding of viable alternative assumptions; 3) developing understanding of the theoretical bases of advanced athletic training knowledge and skill; 4) expanding abilities to discover and develop new knowledge; 5) advancing knowledge and skills in preparation for leadership in athletic training; and 6) instilling a responsibility of service to the profession and communities.

 

 

Division of Health Promotion and Education

 

Undergraduate Major (B.A.)

The Health Promotion major  requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Accreditation/Credentialing Areas include the following:

Health and Fitness Promotion (54 hours)

Women's Health (52 hours)

Global Health and Health Disparities (51 hours)

Environmental Health: Science Intensive (54-55 hours)

Health Promotion specialists seek to improve the health of the general public through education, behavior change and improvement of the environment. Students in the program develop the skills to plan, implement and evaluate programs in a variety of settings, which may include health departments, corporate wellness sites, hospitals/clinics, fitness facilities, nonprofit organizations, international relief organizations, nursing homes, colleges/universities and private industry.

The curriculum is tailored to meet national competencies and prepares students to sit for the National Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam or the Registered Environmental Health Specialist (REHS) exam.  Students will take classes on public health theory, anatomy, human diseases, environmental health science, epidemiology (how diseases are spread,) and how to address risky lifestyle behaviors (i.e., tobacco/alcohol/substance abuse, lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, intentional and unintentional injuries, high levels of stress, and unsafe sexual behaviors.)

 

Minors

Students with a Health Education minor in teaching must have their current First Aid and CPR certification  prior to student teaching.

 

There is also a minor offered in Health Promotion. 

 

 

Graduate Major (M.A.)

The Master of Arts degree in Health Education provides post-graduate academic training for individuals employed in or planning to seek employment as public health practitioners and health educators in a wide variety of settings including public, academic, hospital/clinical, community/non-profit, and corporate settings.  This degree program provides graduate level training designed to prepare public health and health promotion professionals to design, implement, and evaluate interventions working in a wide range of health, public health and health promotion areas. The post-graduate training program enhances the leadership and research skills of public health workers, preparing them for positions of progressive responsibility within their chosen career.

 

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university.  For information on the following program certificates, contact the School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services or the Office of the Registrar, which serves as the centralized registry.

Environmental Health Certificate and Certificate in Global Health and Health Disparities,

 

Division of Physical Education

 

Undergraduate Majors (B.A.)

The Movement and Exercise Science major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Completion of this program prepares students for careers or further study in movement and exercise science or related areas but not for endorsement in K-12 school settings.  To continue in the program and take 3000-level courses and above a student must  have a C- or better in PEMES 2050 (420:050) Anatomy and Physiology of Human Movement .  The student must maintain a cumulative 2.50 GPA in the major to graduate.

 

The Physical Education Teaching major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements, the Professional Education Requirements, and the following specified major requirements, plus electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

Completion of this program qualifies the student to be recommended for endorsements for Physical Education K-8 and Physical Education 5-12.

Student teachers must have current First Aid and CPR certification.

 

Minors

 

Students who completea minor in coaching will qualify for the Department of Education coaching endorsement. The coaching endorsement is for grades K-12. However, this program does not qualify students to teach physical education at any level. 

Students who complete this program and are not teaching majors will qualify for the Department of Education coaching authorization.

This Physical Education Elementary teaching minor is designed for students who are elementary majors receiving K-6 endorsement. Students are encouraged to seek advisement from the elementary physical education staff prior to scheduling.

 

The Physical Education minor, Elementary Teaching, is designed for students who are elementary majors receiving K-6 endorsement.  Students are encouraged to seek advisement from the elementary physical education staff prior to scheduling.

 

Graduate Major (M.A.)

Students interested in an M.A. in Physical Education must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Division of Physical Education (within the School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services) for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program. 

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options. A minimum of 30 semester hours is required for both options. Additional hours may be required if, upon entering the graduate program, the student needs prerequisites. Total hours for the thesis option includes 6 hours of PEMES 6299 (420:299) Research . Total hours for the non-thesis option includes 2 hours of PEMES 6299 (420:299) Research for a research paper. A thesis/research paper defense is required. 

This major offers two emphases.

 

Division of Leisure, Youth and Human Services


Undergraduate Major (B.A.)

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major requires a minimum of 120 total hours to graduate. This total includes Liberal Arts Core requirements and electives to complete the minimum of 120 hours.

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major prepares students to deliver programs and manage facilities designed to meet human, community, and social needs in public, governmental, and nonprofit community agencies. Graduates may find employment in agencies that serve people of all ages from diverse backgrounds in areas such as municipal parks and recreation, commercial recreation, tourism, outdoor recreation, therapeutic recreation (clinical and community-based settings), the nonprofit and youth serving agencies, armed forces recreation, campus recreation, and other leisure service delivery sectors. The major focuses on direct service programming with an emphasis on supervisory and managerial skills. The Leisure, Youth and Human Services program is accredited by NRPA/AALR.

The Leisure, Youth and Human Services major requires all students to take a common core of courses with additional supporting courses in areas of professional interest.

There is also a minor offered in Leisure, Youth and Human Services. 

 

Graduate Major (M.A.)

The M.A. in Leisure, Youth and Human Services is designed to foster preparation for professional leadership roles in the administration of leisure, youth and human services agencies. The program offers the student the opportunity to take an active role in determining personal learning objectives and developing individual programs of study. The program supports professional development through the utilization of relevant philosophy, content, and skills in order to provide management and leadership for effective and efficient delivery of leisure, youth and human services. Students are encouraged to focus on study that has direct relevance to professional practice.  Students can design programs of study for work in campus recreation, nonprofit settings, community recreation, tourism organizations, sports administration, and outdoor resource management.

Students interested in this program must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the Division of Leisure, Youth and Human Services (within the School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services) for other application requirements.  Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission.

The Graduate Record Examination (General Test) is not required for admission to the program.

Only graduate courses (course numbers 5000 or above) will apply to a graduate degree, even if the undergraduate course number (4999 or less) is listed. No exceptions will be made.

This major is available on the thesis and non-thesis options.  A minimum of 36 semester hours is required for the thesis option, and a minimum of 33 semester hours is required for the non-thesis option.  Up to an additional 12 hours of undergraduate work may be required for students who do not have undergraduate preparation in the area.  The thesis option requires a minimum of 15 hours of 200/6000-level course work, including 6 hours of LYHS 6299 (430:299) Research . The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 12 hours of 200/6000-level course work, including 3 hours of LYHS 6299 (430:299) Research . Successful completion of a final comprehensive examination (research paper/thesis) is required for both the thesis and non-thesis options. A final oral comprehensive examination will occur simultaneously during the oral defense of the research paper or thesis.

Program Certificates

The University of Northern Iowa makes available, in addition to traditional programs, the opportunity for students to earn program certificates. Program certificates provide an alternative to programs leading to a degree, a major, or a minor; they certify that an individual has completed a program approved by the university.

The Aquatics Specialization Certificate is to develop and produce quality graduates who have the appropriate skills and certifications to obtain employment in the aquatic profession. Upon completion of the certificate, students will be able to teach Lifeguarding, Water Safety, and be certified as a pool operator through national certifications.

 

This Nonprofit Management Certificate provides knowledge, skill-building and professional experience for students interested in working in the nonprofit sector. Earning this certificate at UNI also enables students to earn a national certificate in Nonprofit Management from Nonprofit Leadership Alliance.

 

The Outdoor Recreation Certificate program is designed to train students for professional employment in the varied and growing field of outdoor recreation and adventure education. This program offers students the opportunity to develop skills in a variety of outdoor recreation activities while studying the theories, trends and issues involved in working with groups, facilitating adventure education, and managing the impacts of recreation on our natural environment. The Certificate in Outdoor Recreation is available to students in all majors.

 

The School-Age Care Leadership Certificate is designed to provide students participating in the Camp Adventure Youth Services program an opportunity to receive credit for their application of youth development principles to school-age children (ages 5-12) in global settings.

 

The Tourism Certificate is administered by the Leisure, Youth and Human Services Division with the School of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services.  For information on this program certificate, contact the Division of Leisure, Youth and Human Services, Tourism Advisor, 203 WRC.

 

 

Doctor of Education

(For all requirements see website www.uni.edu/catalog/collegeofeducation - for PDF version see listing for "College of Education" under the "Interdisciplinary" section of this university catalog.)

Students interested in the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree must submit a completed Application for Admission to Graduate Study and should refer to their MyUNIverse Student Center To-Do list or contact the appropriate Intensive Study Area (ISA) for any other application requirements. Graduate information and application for graduate admission can be found at www.grad.uni.edu/admission. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required for admission to the program.

This program is intended to provide practicing educators, in formal and nonformal settings, the opportunity to continue their study and earn the terminal professional degree in their field. The Ed.D. degree requires a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit beyond the master's degree There are three components to the program:

Professional Common Core (work in educational foundations, fundamentals, and research) 27
Advanced Professional Study (in one of three areas of intensive study) 27
Dissertation 6
Total Hours 60

 

By design, all students are required to study in basic areas that undergird and define educational practice and develop skills of problem definition, data collection and analysis, and interpretation. The three areas of intensive study provide for a specialized focus on practice. The three intensive study areas (ISAs) are:

  • Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Educational Leadership

Note: Students interested in special education with the Curriculum and Instruction ISA or the Educational Leadership ISA should consult the respective ISA descriptions for further information.

In some areas, it is possible to combine doctoral degree study with work toward an endorsement to perform a particular role in K-12 education.

Brief definitions of the three ISAs follows:

Allied Health, Recreation, and Community Services

This area of intensive study is designed to provide students with advanced planning, management, supervision and evaluation of programs in the community and its institutions. The combined areas of allied health, recreation and community services are diverse professional areas knitted together by a unified commitment to enhancing, enriching and sustaining individual well-being and quality of life. Each of these areas contributes unique and different professional perspectives, yet, at the same time, focuses on the individual and collective well-being of people, communities and society as a whole. Graduates are prepared for careers as applied scholars, evaluators, athletic administration, administrators of community nonprofit organizations, youth serving agencies, public parks and recreation agencies, foundations, and government agencies. The program of study will be based upon student's needs, interests, and upon approval by an academic advisor and program of study committee. (For more information, contact the Chair of Leisure, Youth and Human Services Division, the Health Promotion and Education Division, or the Athletic Training Division in the School of Health, Physical Education, and Leisure Services.)

Curriculum and Instruction

This area of intensive study is designed to prepare scholar practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children, from infancy through adolescence, and adult learners, inclusive of a wide variety of diversity. Faculty in this intensive study area come from many departments and disciplines, including but not limited to prekindergarten through tertiary curriculum and pedagogy; foundations of education in psychology, philosophy, social sciences; disability studies, gifted and talented, and multicultural education; literacy education; instructional technology, school library studies; and P-12 content areas such as mathematics, physical education, science, social studies, and language arts. Students interested in becoming special education scholar-practitioners to plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise educational programs for children and adult learners with an emphasis on inclusion and diversity will apply for admission through the Curriculum and Instruction Intensive Study Area. For more information see www.uni.edu/coe/departments/curriculum-instruction/graduate-study/doctoral-study.

Educational Leadership

This area of intensive study in education administration prepares personnel for leadership positions in PK-12 schools, post-secondary institutions, and other educational services or settings. Typical positions held by educators with the terminal degree focused on educational leadership include: principals, superintendents, school district central office administrators, professors of educational leadership, special education directors at the Area Education Agency level or Department of Education administrators and consultants. Students interested in special education administration will apply for admission through Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education. (For more information, contact the Head, Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education, or please see the catalog at www.uni.edu/catalog.uni.edu/collegeofeducation/educationalleadershipandpostsecondaryeducation or visit the Department of Educational Leadership and Postsecondary Education website at www.uni.edu/coe/departments/educational-leadership-postsecondary-education.

 

More detailed information on the above programs can be found in the UNI Academic Catalog.