African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley

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Maintaining and Promoting

African-American Identity, Culture, and Community

This project intends to develop an informative and interactive website focusing on the African–American community in the Cedar Valley, Northeast Iowa, which provides free access to the public regardless of racial or ethnic background. The Web site provides information about the historical and contemporary development of African-American culture and community and informs the public of important events and issues of African-American communities in the local area. The interactive feature (such as blogs and forums) of the website invites the public to participate in the discussion and exchange views on a variety of issues concerning the community, and to celebrate the achievement of the community. Although the focus is on the local community, the information and discussion feature offered by this website would also benefit national and global users. Academically, this project promotes collaborative research on African-American culture and community from the perspectives of communication studies.

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Created and Updated by Chen and Jackson
July 20, 2011

Intro to Africana Sudies, 12:30-1:45(T/TH)

QUESTION:"Briefly describe how the church contributed to the stability of the Black community in Waterloo, Iowa. Your response must include two examples from the video and your reply must be at least ten sentences." 

Intro. to Africana Sudies, 3:30-4:45(M/W)

QUESTION:"Briefly describe how the church contributed to the stability of the Black community in Waterloo, Iowa. Your response must include two examples from the video and your reply must be at least ten sentences." 

Intro. to Africana Sudies, 9:30-10:45(M/W)

QUESTION:"Briefly describe how the church contributed to the stability of the Black community in Waterloo, Iowa. Your response must include two examples from the video and your reply must be at least ten sentences." 

Black Triangle/Smoke Row in Waterloo Iowa

Smoke Row: Black Triangle

By 1915, four hundred African Americans lived and worked in Waterloo. Many came from Holmes County, Mississippi, as strike breakers for the Illinois Central Railroad. Many spent their summer in Waterloo living in Boxcars provided by the Railroad. In those days, all African Americans were required to live in Smokey Row, an area in east Waterloo boarded by the Illinois Central railroad lines on the south and west, Douglas Street on the south, Summer Street on the north, and Mobile Street on the East.

Please provide more information about black Triangle if you have connections with friends whose family were living in the Smokey Row, Waterloo, Iowa.

Map Courtesy: Zillow (www.zillow.com)

Created and Updated by Joyce Chen and David Jackson
May 20, 2013

The Black Community, Spring 2013

Apr.      1       Politics and Education

                      Willie Mae Wright, First Woman Elected Official in Waterloo, Iowa  

                       “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”                    

Discussion Question: Discuss how Willie Mae Wright's political career had a positive impact on the Waterloo community. Provide two examples to explain your position. 

Apr.      3      Russ Lowe, First African American,                   

                     “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”              

Discussion Question: How did Russ Lowe navigate the educational system to create administrative changes in the Waterloo School District? Describe this process in 7-9 sentences.

Apr.       8      Ollabelle Reed,

                      “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”    

 Discussion Question: Describe Mrs. Reed's passion and commitment to education by providing two expamples that illustrate your points.

  

Apr.       29  Business and Sports   

                    Walter Grey, Owner of Grey’s Barber Shop for 30 years

                      “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”              

                      Field Experience narrative and site visit form (3) are due in class

 

May      1     Vivret Norman, Oldest Living Harlem Globetrotter and Humanitarian

                     “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”                 

 

May      6    Mary Spencer, Teacher and Buxton Resident

                    Documentary - “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”

                    Readings -  Buxton: chapter 1                

 

May      8     Bennie Moore, Factory Worker and Buxton Resident

                    Documentary - “African-American Voices of the Cedar Valley”              

                     Readings – Buxton: chapter 6

 

          

 

 

 

Juneteenth World Wide Celebration At Waterloo Iowa

Celebrate the Contributions of Ruth B. Anderson

You are cordially invited

to a reception in honor of

 

Ruth B. Anderson

 

Recipient of the

NASW Iowa Chapter

Catherine G. Williams

Diversity Lifetime Achievement Award

 

On May 19, 2012

12:30 – 2:00 p.m.

 

Payne Memorial A.M.E. Church

1044 Mobile Street

Waterloo, Iowa

 

Public Welcome

Program at 1:00 p.m.

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